Paperboy (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

Paperboy (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

by Mary Kay Kroeger
     
 

In Cincinnati in 1927, paperboy Willie Brinkman attempts to sell extra copies of the special edition covering the Dempsey-Tunney fight in his working-class neighborhood.

Overview

In Cincinnati in 1927, paperboy Willie Brinkman attempts to sell extra copies of the special edition covering the Dempsey-Tunney fight in his working-class neighborhood.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Cahners\\Publishers_Weekly
Lustrous watercolors illuminate this finely crafted period piece set against the Dempsey-Tunney boxing match of 1927. Willie Brinkman works every day after school selling newspapers in Cincinnati, and with his hero, Jack Dempsey, attempting a comeback for the world heavyweight championship, he eagerly signs up to sell 'extras' the night of the fight. The family gathers around the radio to listen-scenes Lewin (illustrator of Borden's Just in Time for Christmas) depicts by showing the rapt family in color and the boxers in black and white. When Dempsey loses, it takes true grit on Willie's part to keep his pledge and try to sell the unpopular news. Based on an event in first-time author Kroeger's father's childhood, the story is seamlessly told, with loving attention to detail, and Lewin's gift for portraiture brings the characters, and an era, to glowing life.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Lustrous watercolors illuminate this finely crafted period piece set against the Dempsey-Tunney boxing match of 1927. Willie Brinkman works every day after school selling newspapers in Cincinnati, and with his hero, Jack Dempsey, attempting a comeback for the world heavyweight championship, he eagerly signs up to sell "extras" the night of the fight. The family gathers around the radio to listen-scenes Lewin (illustrator of Borden's Just in Time for Christmas) depicts by showing the rapt family in color and the boxers in black and white. When Dempsey loses, it takes true grit on Willie's part to keep his pledge and try to sell the unpopular news. Based on an event in first-time author Kroeger's father's childhood, the story is seamlessly told, with loving attention to detail, and Lewin's gift for portraiture brings the characters, and an era, to glowing life. Ages 5-9. (Mar.)
"An engaging work that will bring home, through well-chosen details and a well-told story, the intimate connections one can make with 'famous facts' when the personal perspective is added."
Children's Literature - Alexandria LaFaye
Willie Brinkman sells newspapers on a local corner to help support his family. The year is 1927, and the city is buzzing over the Dempsey-Tunney fight. From the billboards to the twirling barbershop pole, Lewin does a wonderful job of recreating pre-Depression Brooklyn. The finely detailed illustrations allow readers to almost place themselves in the time period. Within the vibrant color illustrations, readers see black and white depictions of the fight scenes mentioned in the text. The authors make excellent use of dialogue to develop the characters and heighten the tension. To place their fictional tale in context, the authors provide an afterword that discusses events surrounding the fight.
Children's Literature - Jan Lieberman
1927 is brought to life by Ted Lewin's detailed paintings. Willie Brinkman sells papers on the streetcorners in Cincinnati to earn money to help his family. Most of all he wants to sell the fight news the night of the Gene Tunney-Jack Dempsey fight but the result of the fight is a disappointment to Willie's working-class neighborhood. Not a paper sold. He is ready to give up until he thinks of the determination of Jack Dempsey, a fighter not a quitter. Willie proves his worth. The magic of this story lies in Lewin's paintings which recreate the autos, trolleys, buildings, clothing and lifestyle of the 20's. Ted Lewin's pictures are worth a thousand words.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 1-3The big story here is the 1927 Jack Dempsey-Gene Tunney fight for the World Heavyweight Championship in Chicago. The small story, through, is about Willie Brinkman, a paperboy on a "small potatoes" corner in Cincinnati. In the hours preceding the famous fight, the sense of excitement mounts and the youngster signs up to sell the "Fight Extra." The drama of this particular moment in sports history aligns with Willie's personal drama, as the large family gathers around Pop's wooden radio. It is with frustration and disbelief that Willie realizes that Dempsey has missed his moment in the seventh round and will not regain his title. The sense of unfairness follows Willie like a shadow as he makes his way through the dark streets to pick up the papers he has no heart to sell and few in the neighborhood have the heart to buy. His sense of duty is not lost on his boss, though, who, next day, counts off 225 papers and says: "I need a boy who shows up, and who works, win or lose." Lewin's watercolors bring Willie's Cincinnati to life. The streets and buildings are large and enveloping, creating not only a strong sense of place and time, but of the youngster's small, particular, emerging place in it. Black-and-white "stills" of Dempsey and Tunney share some pages with vivid, animated full-color scenes of the Brinkman family. An engaging work that will bring home, through well-chosen details and a well-told story, the intimate connections one can make with "famous facts" when the personal perspective is added.Susan Powers, Rock Creek Forest Elementary School, Chevy Chase, MD
Hazel Rochman
More exuberant than the artwork in Lewin's Caldecott Honor Book, "Peppe the Lamplighter" (1993), the beautiful watercolor illustrations here have the same realistic focus on a boy in a working-class neighborhood. Willie Brinkman, a paperboy in Cincinnati in 1927, is eager to sell a special edition with news of the Dempsey-Tunney prizefight in Chicago. Jack Dempsey is a hero in Willie's neighborhood, but Dempsey loses the fight; when Willie goes out to sell the papers, no one wants to read the disappointing news. However, the boss rewards Willie for showing up for work, win or lose, and he gets assigned to a much busier corner to sell his papers. In shades of blue and brown, Lewin's pictures vividly capture people in the busy streets; the quiet corners at dawn; the crowded rooms of home with the family huddled around the radio. In the background are black-and-white scenes of the boxing match that fills the characters' thoughts and dreams. Parents or librarians may want to use the story, which is based on a true incident in Kroeger's family, to start kids talking about their own family folklore.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780613340236
Publisher:
San Val, Incorporated
Publication date:
03/28/2001
Edition description:
THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY
Pages:
31
Product dimensions:
8.78(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.38(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Louise Borden is the highly regarded author of many books, including Good Luck, Mrs. K!, Sleds on Boston Common, Good-bye, Charles Lindbergh and The Little Ships: The Heroic Rescue at Dunkirk in WW II—all published by Margaret McElderry Books. Across the Blue Pacific is based on the true story of her uncle, Theodore Taylor Walker, who served aboard the USS Albacore (SS-218) during World War II. She lives with her husband, Pete, in Terrace Park, Ohio, and has three grown children. Her website can be found at www.louiseborden.com.

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