Parables for Our Time: Rereading New Testament Scholarship after the Holocaust

Hardcover (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$81.81
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $6.44
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 92%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (10) from $6.44   
  • New (2) from $13.11   
  • Used (8) from $6.44   

Overview

Over the centuries, New Testament texts have often been read in ways that reflect and encourage anti-Semitism. For example, the parable of the "wicked husbandmen," who kill the son of their landlord in order to seize the land, has been used to blame the Jews for the death of Christ. Since the Holocaust, Christian scholars have increasingly recognized and rejected this inheritance. In Parables for Our Time Tania Oldenhage seeks to fashion a biblical hermeneutics that consciously works with memories of the Holocaust.

New Testament scholars have not directly confronted the horror of Nazi crimes, Oldenhage argues, but their work has nonetheless been deeply affected by the events of the Holocaust. By placing twentieth-century biblical scholarship within its specific historical and cultural contexts, she is able to trace the process by which the Holocaust gradually moved into the collective consciousness of New Testament scholars, both in Germany and in the United States. Her focus is on the scholarly interpretation of the parables of Jesus. She sets the stage with the work of Wolfgang Harnisch who exemplifies the problems surrounding Holocaust remembrance in the Germany of the 1980s and 1990s. She then turns to Joachim Jeremias's eminent work on the parables, first published in 1947. Jeremias's anti-Jewish rhetoric, she argues, should be understood not only as a perpetuation of an age-old interpretive pattern, but as representative of German difficulties in responding to the Holocaust immediately after the war. Oldenhage goes on to explore the way in which Jeremias's approach was challenged by biblical scholars in the U.S. during the 1970s. In particular, she examines the turn to literature and literary theory exemplified in the works of John Dominic Crossan and Paul Ricoeur. Nazi atrocities became part of the cultural reservoir from which Crossan and Ricoeur drew, she shows, although they never engaged with the historical facts of the Holocaust. In conclusion, Oldenhage offers her own reading of the parable of the wicked husbandmen, demonstrating how the turn from historical to literary criticism opens up the text to interpretation in light of the Holocaust. If the parables are to be meaningful in our time, she contends, we must take account of the troubling resonances between these ancient Christian stories and the atrocities of Auschwitz.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Tania Oldenhage's book is like a breath of fresh air.... the substance of her argument leaves major milestones of New Testament scholarship in shambles."—Holocaust and Genocide Studies
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780195150520
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 4/18/2002
  • Series: AAR Cultural Criticism Series
  • Pages: 200
  • Lexile: 1410L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Tania Oldenhage is Assistant Professor of Religion at Mount Union College, in Alliance, Ohio. A native of Germany, she studied Protestant theology at the Universities of Heidelberg, Marburg, and Hamburg. She received her Ph.D. from Temple University.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1 Introduction 3
Pt. I Holocaust Remembrance in Germany
2 "On Sundays the Forgotten Comes" 13
3 The Forgotten Comes to Parable Studies 23
Pt. II Historical Criticism and the Legacy of the Holocaust
4 Joachim Jeremias and the Historical-Critical Approach 39
5 "In View of Catastrophe" 51
6 Historical Criticism and the Return into History 60
Pt. III Jesus as Poet of Our Time
7 John Dominic Crossan and the Literary Turn in Biblical Studies 73
8 Comedy, Play, and "The Horrors of This Century" 85
9 Parables for Our Time? 101
Pt. IV The Promise of Metaphor Theory
10 Paul Ricoeur's "Biblical Hermeneutics" 115
11 Limit-Experiences of Human Life 124
12 Toward a Post-Holocaust Biblical Hermeneutics 139
Notes 153
References 177
Index 185
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)