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Paradise Lost: Books 3-4
     

Paradise Lost: Books 3-4

4.8 669
by John Milton, Lois Potter (Editor), John Broadbent (Editor)
 

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A collection of anthologies, resource and reference books, including titles from Oscar Wilde, Mary Shelley, Alex Madina, Jo Phillips and Adrian Barlow.

Overview

A collection of anthologies, resource and reference books, including titles from Oscar Wilde, Mary Shelley, Alex Madina, Jo Phillips and Adrian Barlow.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Even a dozen critical essays, representative of the postmodern wave that has largely displaced liberal humanism in English studies in the years in which they were written (1970-96), do not dethrone Satan as the flawed hero of Milton's masterwork. Contributors vivisect, yet manage to convey, the contemporary relevance of the seminal 17th century epic poem with interpretations from Marxist/ historicist, feminist, psychoanalytic, and poststructuralist approaches. The editor provides a concisely informative introduction to the English Revolution and modern contexts for deconstructing . Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknew.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521211505
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
06/17/1976
Series:
Milton for Schools and Colleges Series
Pages:
143
Product dimensions:
4.96(w) x 7.80(h) x 0.59(d)
Age Range:
16 - 18 Years

Meet the Author

John Milton (1608-1674) was an English poet, best known for his epic poem Paradise Lost, which first appeared in 1667, having been completely written, and dictated, while he was blind. His works continue to influence Western culture, thought and language.

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Paradise Lost 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 669 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I could not read it clearly to many typos.
Mandy Jarvis More than 1 year ago
Half the time I could figure out what the words where suppose to be. The miss spellings could be so bad at times that meanings of entire sentences were lost.
Seghetto More than 1 year ago
Milton is hard to read. The language of the late 1600's seemed impenetrable to me at first, but Teskey's notes helped me through it. Not much has to be said about the poem itself: it is cemented in the canon of the English language as a masterpiece. One thing I was surprised by was the sympathetic construction of Satan. He is not an evil character, he is just angry and even embodies human traits. This edition also includes John Milton's work Areopogatica about the Church of England and their licensing rights. I was moved by Milton's defense of free speech.
DCDONLEY More than 1 year ago
Hard to follow yet worth reading. Modern versions of this text often bastardize the real meaning. If you have read a newer version you would do well to read this if not another more concise version to get the full meaning of 'Paradise Lost'.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Find another.
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