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Paradise Theater
     

Paradise Theater

by Styx
 

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After successfully establishing themselves as one of America's best commercial progressive rock bands of the late '70s with albums like The Grand Illusion and Pieces of Eight, Chicago's Styx had taken a dubious step towards pop overkill with singer Dennis DeYoung's

Overview

After successfully establishing themselves as one of America's best commercial progressive rock bands of the late '70s with albums like The Grand Illusion and Pieces of Eight, Chicago's Styx had taken a dubious step towards pop overkill with singer Dennis DeYoung's ballad "Babe." The centerpiece of 1979's uneven Cornerstone album, the number one single sowed the seeds of disaster for the group by pitching DeYoung's increasingly mainstream ambitions against the group's more conservative songwriters, Tommy Shaw and James "JY" Young. Hence, what had once been a healthy competitive spirit within the band quickly deteriorated into bitter co-existence during the sessions for 1980's Paradise Theater -- and all-out warfare by the time of 1983's infamous Kilroy Was Here. For the time being, however, Paradise Theater seemed to represent the best of both worlds, since its loose concept about the roaring '20s heyday and eventual decline of an imaginary theater (used as a metaphor for the American experience in general, etc., etc.) seemed to satisfy both of the band's camps with its return to complex hard rock (purists Shaw and JY) while sparing no amount of pomp and grandeur (DeYoung). The stage is set by the first track, "A.D. 1928," which features a lonely DeYoung on piano and vocals introducing the album's recurring musical theme before launching into "Rockin' the Paradise" -- a total team effort of wonderfully stripped down hard rock. From this point forward, DeYoung's compositions ("Nothing Ever Goes as Planned," "The Best of Times") continue to stick close to the overall storyline, while Shaw's ("Too Much Time on My Hands," "She Cares") try to resist thematic restrictions as best they can. Among these, "The Best of Times" -- with its deliberate, marching rhythm -- remains one of the more improbable Top Ten hits of the decade (somehow it just works), while "Too Much Time on My Hands" figures among Shaw's finest singles ever. As for JY, the band's third songwriter (and resident peacekeeper) is only slightly more cooperative with the Paradise Theater concept. His edgier compositions include the desolate tale of drug addiction, "Snowblind," and the rollicking opus "Half-Penny, Two-Penny," which infuses a graphic depiction of inner city decadence with a final, small glimmer of hope and redemption. The song also leads straight into the album's beautiful saxophone-led epilogue, "A.D. 1958," which once again reveals MC DeYoung alone at his piano. A resounding success, Paradise Theater would become Styx's greatest commercial triumph; and in retrospect, it remains one of the best examples of the convergence between progressive rock and AOR which typified the sound of the era's top groups (Journey, Kansas, etc.). For Styx, its success would spell both their temporary saving grace and ultimate doom, as the creative forces which had already been tearing at the band's core finally reached unbearable levels three years later. It is no wonder that when the band reunited after over a decade of bad blood, all the music released post-1980 was left on the cutting room floor -- further proof that Paradise Theater was truly the best of times.

Product Details

Release Date:
05/20/2014
Label:
Audio Fidelity
UPC:
0780014217426
catalogNumber:
174
Rank:
74123

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Styx   Primary Artist
Dennis DeYoung   Keyboards,Vocals
Tommy Shaw   Guitar,Vocals
James Young   Guitar,Vocals
Dan Barber   Horn Section
Steve Eisen   Saxophone,Soloist
Mike Halpin   Horn Section
John Haynor   Horn Section
Chuck Panozzo   Bass Guitar,bass pedals
John Panozzo   Percussion,Drums
Mark Ohlsen   Horn Section
Bill Simpson   Horn Section
Hangalator Horn Section   Horn Section

Technical Credits

Styx   Arranger,Producer
Dennis DeYoung   Composer,Concept
Tommy Shaw   Composer
James Young   Composer
Rob Kingsland   Engineer
Gary Loizzo   Engineer
Ed Tossing   Horn Arrangements
Chuck Beeson   Art Direction
Chris Hopkins   Illustrations
Derek Sutton   Direction
Jeff Ayeroff   Art Direction
Jeff Ravitz   Road Crew
George Leemon   Road Crew
Ed Stuckey   Road Crew
"Yaz" Jastrembski   Road Crew
Pat Quinn   Road Crew
Tom Reedy   Road Crew
Mike Sherrill   Road Crew
Mike Cooper   Road Crew

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