Paradoxes by R. M. Sainsbury | Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Paradoxes / Edition 3

Paradoxes / Edition 3

by R. M. Sainsbury
     
 

ISBN-10: 0521720796

ISBN-13: 9780521720793

Pub. Date: 03/31/2009

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

A paradox can be defined as an unacceptable conclusion derived by apparently acceptable reasoning from apparently acceptable premises. Unlike party puzzles or brain teasers, many paradoxes raise serious philosophical problems, and they are associated with crises of thought and revolutionary advances. The expanded and revised third edition of this intriguing book

Overview

A paradox can be defined as an unacceptable conclusion derived by apparently acceptable reasoning from apparently acceptable premises. Unlike party puzzles or brain teasers, many paradoxes raise serious philosophical problems, and they are associated with crises of thought and revolutionary advances. The expanded and revised third edition of this intriguing book considers a range of knotty paradoxes including Zeno's paradoxical claim that the runner can never overtake the tortoise, a new chapter on paradoxes about morals, paradoxes about belief, and, hardest of all, paradoxes about truth. The discussion uses a minimum of technicality but also grapples with complicated and difficult considerations, and is accompanied by helpful questions designed to engage the reader with the arguments. The result is not only an explanation of paradoxes but also an excellent introduction to philosophical thinking.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521720793
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
03/31/2009
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
190
Sales rank:
1,071,871
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.40(d)

Table of Contents

Foreword to third edition vii

Introduction 1

Suggested reading 3

1 Zeno's paradoxes: space, time, and motion 4

1.1 Introduction 4

1.2 Space 5

1.3 The Racetrack 11

1.4 The Racetrack again 15

1.5 Achilles and the Tortoise 19

1.6 The Arrow 19

Suggested reading 21

2 Moral paradoxes 22

2.1 Crime Reduction 22

2.2 Mixed Blessings 27

2.3 Not Being Sorry 31

2.4 Moral dilemmas 34

Suggested reading 39

3 Vagueness: the paradox of the heap 40

3.1 Sorites paradoxes: preliminaries 40

3.2 Sorites paradoxes: some options 46

3.3 Accepting the conclusion: Unger's view 48

3.4 Rejecting the premises: the epistemic theory 49

3.5 Rejecting the premises: supervaluations 51

3.6 Rejecting the reasoning: degrees of truth 56

3.7 Vague objects? 63

Suggested reading 66

4 Acting rationally 69

4.1 Newcomb's paradox 69

4.2 The Prisoner's Dilemma 82

Suggested reading 88

5 Believing rationally 90

5.1 Paradoxes of confirmation 90

5.1.1 Background 90

5.1.2 The paradox of the Ravens 95

5.1.3 "Grue" 99

5.2 The Unexpected Examination 107

5.3 Revising the Unexpected Examination 110

5.4 The Knower 115

Suggested reading 120

6 Classes and truth 123

6.1 Russell's paradox 123

6.2 The Liar: semantic defects 127

6.3 Grounding and truth 129

6.4 The Strengthened Liar 132

6.5 Levels 133

6.6 Self-reference 137

6.7 Indexicality 138

6.8 Indexical circularity 139

6.9 Comparison: how similar are Russell's paradox and the Liar? 142

Suggested reading 145

7 Are any contradictions acceptable? 150e

7.1 Contradictions entail everything 151

7.2 A sentence which is both true and false could have no intelligible content 152

7.3 Three dualities 153

7.4 Negation 155

7.5 Falsehood and untruth 157

Suggested reading 158

Appendix I Some more paradoxes 160

Appendix II Remarks on some text questions and appended paradoxes 168

Bibliography 172

Index 179

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >