Parasite Eve

( 7 )

Overview

When Dr. Nagashima loses his wife in a mysterious car crash, he is overwhelmed with grief but also an eerie sense of purpose; he becomes obsessed wiht reincarnating his dead wife. Her donated kidney is transplanted into a young girl wiht a debilitating disorder, bu the doctor also feels compelled to keep a small sample of her liver in his laboratory. When these cells start mutating rapidly, a consciousness bent on determining its own fate awakens, bent on becoming the new ...
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Overview

When Dr. Nagashima loses his wife in a mysterious car crash, he is overwhelmed with grief but also an eerie sense of purpose; he becomes obsessed wiht reincarnating his dead wife. Her donated kidney is transplanted into a young girl wiht a debilitating disorder, bu the doctor also feels compelled to keep a small sample of her liver in his laboratory. When these cells start mutating rapidly, a consciousness bent on determining its own fate awakens, bent on becoming the new dominant species on earth.

Parasite Eve was the basis of the hugely popular videogame of the same name in the U.S. and has been cinematized in Japan.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Comes just in time for summer getaway reading…
Oozes with enough violence and sexual perversity to make Caligula blush.”
—TIME

“Hideaki Sena, a pharmacologist, microbiologist and now pop icon, knows all too well how to combine the scientifically plausible with the psychologically unimaginable… Have fun with it, by all means, but don’t keep it on the bedside table.”
—Susan Salter Reynolds, L.A. Times

“Parasite Eve combines Michael Crichton’s scientific cutting-edge plausibility with David Cronenberg’s abject flesh/sex horror. Throw in Frankenstein and The Blob, synthesize, and enjoy.”
—Fangoria

“Sena’s work in pharmacology and microbiology lends this Japanese import a sense of discovery and fear that resonates when new science is not fully understood. SF and horror fans who liked Suzuki Koji’s Ring…will find Parasite Eve a chilling tale on a cellular level; recommended.”
—Library Journal

Publishers Weekly
Japanese pharmacologist Sena's biochemical horror novel, which won the first Japan Horror Novel Award, has lost something in translation. Notwithstanding the many academic footnotes, the author fails to suspend disbelief in the book's outlandish premise-that mitochondria, subcellular organelles, have secretly evolved and developed an intelligence superior to Homo sapiens. Alternating between past and present, the story opens with a car crash that imperils the life of Kiyomi, the wife of scientist Toshiaki Nagashima; that "accident" sets in motion the mitochondria's elaborate scheme involving a parasitic kidney transplant to inherit the planet. The plot reaches almost farcical levels when the cell component manipulates organic matter to form podlike human simulacra, complete with fake genitalia. Readers expecting the thrills or suspense of Curt Siodmak's classic Donovan's Brain or even Michael Crichton's Prey will come away disappointed. (Sept.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
When Dr. Toshiaki loses his wife in a car accident, her kidney is transplanted into a young girl while her liver cells are given to the grieving doctor for study. Obsessed with keeping his wife alive, Toshiaki experiments on the cells only to find they possess a mitochondria strain that regenerates at an alarming rate. As the strain searches for a way to evolve, Mariko, the kidney transplant patient, suffers from nightmares and fits of depression. Fearful of the kidney being rejected, Mariko's doctors look into her strange behavior. As they close in on the cause, the strain, dubbed "Parasite Eve," gains enough power to take on a powerful shape and begins searching for a new host to give birth to an evolving supercreature. Sena's work in pharmacology and microbiology lends this Japanese import a sense of discovery and fear that resonates when new science is not fully understood. Sf and horror fans who liked Suzuki Koji's The Ring and films like this year's White Noise will find Parasite Eve a chilling tale on a cellular level; recommended.-Ron Samul, New London, CT Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781932234206
  • Publisher: Vertical, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 5/20/2008
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 603,519
  • Product dimensions: 5.20 (w) x 7.90 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Hideaki Sena Ph.D. Pharmacology, was still a graduate student when his first novel, Parasite Eve, turned him into a pop cultural heavyweight. He became the first recipient of the Japan Horror Award and is credited--alongside Koji Suzuki, whose Spiral appeared the same summer--with initiating a smart, new style of horror writing in Japan. Subsequent novels include the Japan Sci-Fi Award winner Brain Valley and Tomorrow's Robots. Dr. Sena, who lectures on microbiology and genre ficiton, lives in Sendai, Japan.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 7 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2006

    The book that sparked the Japanese horror boom...

    I bought this book due to the fact that in high school, I was a big fan of the video game Parasite Eve. The events of the game occurred after that of the book, and made a few allusions to the work as well. This was originally released in Japan in 1995 as Parasaito Ibu. Waiting so long for a translation and having so much success in Japan, I thought the book would have been better. The premise of the story is an amazing idea based on the Mitochondria Eve theory. A doctor, who does research in the area of mitochondria, experiences the loss of his wife in a car accident. After culturing some of her liver cells, a.k.a. playing god and keeping her alive, strange occurances begin to unfold. The mitochondria in her body seems to have developed a consciousness. Did the consciousness develop previous to the wife's death or due to the manner in which the doctor cultures them? What will this mean for mankind? The storyline follows the doctor, a patient who receives the doctor's wife's kidney in an organ doning program, and vaguely covers a few other characters who play roles in the main characters' lives. Although the bit of plot that is present is interesting, there is far too much talk about the scientific instruments, methods,and et cetera used by the doctor and the researchers. So much that it makes the story seem a background detail to the discussions of beta-oxidation enzymes, NIH3T, collagenase and whatever else. The book even has a glossary at the end to define all the scientific terms. I enjoy science fiction based on real science, but this takes it a tad far. I thought the Ring Trilogy by Koji Suzuki was far more efficient in keeping the storyline entact while mixing a little real science elements in the background. Overall, if you like biology/evolution theories then this could have the potential to be a stimulating read. If not, I'd steer clear.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2005

    PARASITE EVE

    If you have played the videogame Parasite eve I and II, read this and you'll understand what that Japanese doctor was talking about. If you've seen the Japanese movie, then prepair for a shocking thing. The movie is totally off, same story line, but I think there are alot of things that were added when making the movie. If you haven't played the videogame or seen the movie, it's a long the Resident Evil line, just no virus. It's a good book. HINT: look up Mitochondrial Eve theroy. The book is base on that theroy, and 'her' plans. Yesh, the mitochondria will take over. ^.^' OH! This book coming out in america is rare! It's from japan! JAPAN ROCKS! Thank you.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2013

    Highly Recommended!

    A truly fantastic explanation and prelude to the Parasite Eve video game series. Everything you didn't understand in the games will make sense because of this book! Get it :D!!!

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    Posted March 31, 2009

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    Posted June 11, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2010

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