The Paris Correspondent

Overview

High-profile journalist Alan S. Cowell's latest novel is a fast-paced trip into the dark heart of a newspaper office abroad. Addictive and illuminating, it deftly portrays the rivalries and complicated passions at the story's heart. Ed Clancy and Joe Shelby are journalists with The Paris Star, an English-language paper based in Paris. Relics from a time when print news was in its heyday, when being a reporter meant watching a city crumble around you as you called in one last dispatch, the Internet age has taken ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$20.79
BN.com price
(Save 19%)$25.95 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (31) from $1.99   
  • New (12) from $1.99   
  • Used (19) from $1.99   
The Paris Correspondent: A Novel of Newspapers, Then and Now

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$12.99
BN.com price

Overview

High-profile journalist Alan S. Cowell's latest novel is a fast-paced trip into the dark heart of a newspaper office abroad. Addictive and illuminating, it deftly portrays the rivalries and complicated passions at the story's heart. Ed Clancy and Joe Shelby are journalists with The Paris Star, an English-language paper based in Paris. Relics from a time when print news was in its heyday, when being a reporter meant watching a city crumble around you as you called in one last dispatch, the Internet age has taken them by surprise. The two friends are faced with the death of what they hold most dear—their careers, and, for Shelby, a woman he cannot bring himself to mention.

The Paris Correspondent is a tribute to journalism, love, and liquor in a turbulent era. Written in riveting prose that captures the changing world of a foreign correspondent's life, Alan S. Cowell's breakout novel is not to be missed. Writing from experience and in homage to Reynolds Packard's Dateline Paris, his razor-sharp and darkly funny style will win readers the world over.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Covering some of the same territory as Tom Rachman's The Imperfectionists, Cowell's first novel is practically torn from the headlines. The newsmen of the Star, an American paper in Paris, struggle with the transformation from print to digital. Editor Ed Clancy is pleased when his old friend Joe Shelby, a peripatetic correspondent who's covered everything from Vietnam to Sarajevo, takes a job at the Star. Shelby clings to his old school ways while the more pragmatic Clancy tries to keep up with the times. Complicating matters is the arrival of Gibson Dullar, a rival of Shelby's in both romance and scoops. When the conflict between Shelby and Dullar turns potentially deadly, Clancy takes it upon himself to investigate their pasts in the hopes of discovering the source of their enmity. It all leads to a newsroom confrontation over a report on protests in Egypt that reveals the rift between bottom-line executives and journalistic integrity. Cowell, a New York Times reporter, does an excellent job of dramatically illustrating the impact of technology on the gathering and dissemination of news. Though at times melodrama intrudes and the conflicts are conveniently schematic, when these characters uncork a yarn about the past, the book snaps to life. (Oct.)
Library Journal
This novel is at once a celebration of the romantic life of the foreign news correspondent before the age of the Internet and an elegy for a once-noble profession that has become besieged, mercenary, and driven by the bottom line. At the novel's center are two old friends, both longtime journalists working in Paris, who are caught between these past and present worlds. The swashbuckling Joe Shelby is fond of taking risks but believes deeply in his work, while Ed Clancy is his admiring but less adventurous friend. The action involves old grudges and a grand love story, along with plenty of discussion about the fallen state of journalism; Cowell (The Terminal Spy) is himself an accomplished journalist, and the novel feels grounded in lived experience. VERDICT The narrative begins slowly and has some problems with plotting, appearing somewhat overwritten in places, but Cowell finds his rhythm as he progresses and builds to a satisfying and poignant conclusion. Recommended especially for journalism buffs.—Patrick Sullivan, Manchester Community Coll., CT
Kirkus Reviews
Storied globetrotting newspaperman Joe Shelby and his longtime friend and editor Ed Clancy, newly installed as glorified web-copy providers at the Paris Star, curse the exigencies of the digital age while basking in their memories of the hallowed age of print. Shelby, introduced in New York Times veteran Cowell's 2003 debut, A Walking Guide, is one of those hard-drinking, sprawling, larger-than-life characters who finds fulfillment in conflict and regret--and the sound of his own versions of reality. Haunted for years by his stalled romance with the fearless female war photographer Faria Duclos, and stung by her dalliances with journalistic nemeses of his, Shelby is an inveterate womanizer--more so now that physical ailments are overtaking him, and Faria, who still loves him, is dying. A low-key indictment of an era in journalism in which speed is more important than accuracy and behind-the-scenes struggles now take place in private computer queues, The Paris Correspondent is more boldly a paean to the days when bylines were fought and sweated over, facts ruled--and newsrooms weren't so damned quiet. There isn't much plot, but people, places and war zones whiz by enjoyably and Paris is beautifully evoked (Clancy is married to a classy horse-breeder named Marie-Claire who takes him to all the right events). The British-born Cowell reveals a strong debt to Hemingway in his depiction of the male friendship and the men's identification with the values of a vanishing era (Shelby idolizes the French Romantic poet Gérard de Nerval). There's also a touch of Kingsley Amis in Shelby's satiric dimensions and of Saul Bellow's Ravelstein in the book's late-in-the-day confessions. A stylish, expertly drawn novel about the characters who made journalism what it was, and whose disappearance is making journalism what it is now.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781590206713
  • Publisher: Overlook Press, The
  • Publication date: 10/12/2011
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 6.32 (w) x 9.18 (h) x 1.03 (d)

Meet the Author

Alan S. Cowell is a journalist. Since 2008 he has been senior correspondent for NYTimes.com based in Paris. He is also the author of A Walking Guide: A Novel and The Terminal Spy: The Life and Death of Alexander Litvinenko.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)