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Park Bench Theories
     

Park Bench Theories

by Jamie Scott & the Town
 
Following a brace of 2004 Top 30 singles, support slots with Ginuwine and Mario Winans, and an appearance in street-dance flick Step Up, Jamie Scott was poised to become the next big British R&B star. However, the singer/songwriter spent the subsequent three years following the shelving of his debut album,

Overview

Following a brace of 2004 Top 30 singles, support slots with Ginuwine and Mario Winans, and an appearance in street-dance flick Step Up, Jamie Scott was poised to become the next big British R&B star. However, the singer/songwriter spent the subsequent three years following the shelving of his debut album, Soul Searching, concentrating on a much more organic stripped-back acoustic sound that has more in common with the '70s AOR of James Taylor and the mellow soul of Donny Hathaway than the modern urban production of Craig David and Jay Sean. With claims that he never listened to contemporary music while growing up, the self-taught multi-instrumentalist's first album to be officially released, Park Bench Theories, does indeed sound like it could have been recently discovered in a dusty vinyl collector's basement. With backing by his regular five-piece band, the Town, its 13 heartfelt and melodic tracks, co-written with the likes of Linda Perry (P!nk), Martin Terefe (KT Tunstall), and Tracie Ackerman (Kylie Minogue), all possess an effortlessly timeless feel that belies Scott's young age. The shuffling percussion, bluesy piano chords, and flashes of electric guitar on "London Town" recall the organic folk of early Paul Simon, "When Will I See Your Face Again" is a beautifully understated melancholic ode to a lost love, and the chiming guitars and driving chorus of "Changes" echo the tender indie balladry of Coldplay's Parachutes. Best of all is the epic "Shadows," which begins with sparse acoustics and a gorgeous lilting piano hook and ends in a powerful but subtle crescendo of soaring violins and distorted feedback. Of course, the album's most powerful weapon is Scott himself, whose wondrous jazz-soul tones, part John Mayer, part Jeff Buckley, part Stevie Wonder, are able to elevate the occasionally bland and samey production into an engaging listen. He may share the same first name as fellow retro-inspired guitarist/songwriters Morrison and Blunt, but Park Bench Theories proves that Scott is undoubtedly the more authentic proposition.

Product Details

Release Date:
04/08/2008
Label:
Universal Int'l
UPC:
0602517461970
catalogNumber:
1746197

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Jamie Scott & the Town   Primary Artist
David Angell   Violin
John Catchings   Cello
David Davidson   Violin
Toby Smith   Piano
Kristin Wilkinson   Viola
Love Sponge String Quartet   Track Performer
Claes Björklund   Piano,Keyboards,Hammond Organ
Martin Terefe   Acoustic Guitar,Electric Guitar
Neil Primrose   Percussion,Drums
Andreas Olsson   Guitar,Glockenspiel,Tambourine,Mellotron,Vibes
J. S. Baylin   Acoustic Guitar,Mandolin,Electric Guitar,Keyboards,Vocals,Background Vocals
Michael Baylin   Background Vocals
Douglas Payne   Bass Guitar
Robert Robson   Trumpet

Technical Credits

Dave James   Composer
Tracie Ackerman   Composer
Hod David   Composer
Linda Perry   Composer
Toby Smith   Composer
David Glass   Composer
Nick Terry   Engineer
Martin Terefe   Arranger,Composer,Producer
Daewoo Kim   Engineer
Iain Hill   Engineer
J. S. Baylin   Arranger

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