Parkinson's Disease: 300 Tips for Making Life Easier, 2nd Edition
  • Parkinson's Disease: 300 Tips for Making Life Easier, 2nd Edition
  • Parkinson's Disease: 300 Tips for Making Life Easier, 2nd Edition

Parkinson's Disease: 300 Tips for Making Life Easier, 2nd Edition

by Shelley Peterman Schwarz
     
 

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An indispensable resource for patients, families, and caregivers

Filled with creative tips and techniques, this updated second edition of Parkinson's Disease: 300 Tips for Making Life Easier contains a wealth of ideas and shortcuts for working, organizing, simplifying, and conserving time and energy while living with Parkinson's disease. It

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Overview

An indispensable resource for patients, families, and caregivers

Filled with creative tips and techniques, this updated second edition of Parkinson's Disease: 300 Tips for Making Life Easier contains a wealth of ideas and shortcuts for working, organizing, simplifying, and conserving time and energy while living with Parkinson's disease. It includes:

  • Ways to make your home safe and accessible, your mealtimes more pleasurable, and your communications easier
  • Unique product suggestions that make daily living tasks less stressful
  • Extensive resources to help you easily locate items and services

"

Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Joel Havemann, BA (Los Angeles Times)
Description: Parkinson's Disease: 300 Tips in fact spells out 355 ideas (some duplicative) to help those with the disease and those who help people with the disease cope with it, along with helpful lists of available resources. Part of a series that also includes multiple sclerosis (which the author has), the new Parkinson's handbook updates a 2002 edition with new tips.
Purpose: The author's goal is to help people cope with Parkinson's, certainly a laudable objective. She brings the welcome perspective of a patient (although she does not have Parkinson's herself) as opposed to that of a healthcare professional, many of whom have included similar information in their books explaining what is known medically about Parkinson's. Perhaps inevitably, however, I found most of her 355 tips to be either obvious (don't fill your drinking glass to the rim if you have a tremor) or inappropriate to my circumstances.
Audience: The book is written for both Parkinson's patients and their caregivers — an important inclusion, since caregivers are often the forgotten victims of the disease. Some of the tips, however, seem aimed at the newly diagnosed, while the majority are for much more advanced patients, those who need a wheelchair and have trouble getting food to mouth. That the author has multiple sclerosis and not Parkinson's makes her no less of an authority; the diseases are similar, and the author has learned from the more than 100 Parkinson's patients, caregivers and healthcare professionals she has interviewed.
Features: The lists of resources for Parkinson's patients and the inclusion of tips for caregivers are among the innovative features of the book. Its major shortcoming is its uncertainty about the stage of its readers' disease. The author acknowledges that readers might not be able to handle the advanced Parkinson's sufferers they might encounter in support groups. But a great many of its tips are aimed at patients with advanced symptoms, and newer patients might not want to be told to check in advance whether a prospective hotel accommodates wheelchairs or to eat baby foods because they're easy to swallow.
Assessment: The book has many of the pluses and minuses of other handbooks on coping with Parkinson's (including the American Parkinson Disease Association's Coping with Parkinson's Disease, Susan B. Levin, editor). It includes some useful suggestions, but to be inclusive of readers with a wide variety of symptoms, it necessarily has many tips that are inappropriate to many readers. In particular, the book would be more effective if it could isolate its tips for advanced patients from its suggestions for new ones. The lists of relevant resources at the end of each chapter justifies replacing the first edition with the second.
CAPHIS Consumer Health Connections
"This [new] version, which has been updated to include new products and developments, concentrates on the person with PD, giving him or her easy-to-follow ideas organized by subject in a portable format...Schwartz's own experiences with multiple sclerosis make her sensitive to the needs for people with PD to be informed about their own needs and connected with those around them."-- Book News

"The second edition updates and expands on ways to streamline daily activities and...make life less stressful... In a caring tone, she advocates independence and self-reliance." -- Parkinson's Disease Update

"A book filled with tips that will help you make life easier for someone you care about or for yourself. This book begins with the basic concepts of living with PD and proceeds to help you with such subjects as home safety, grooming, communication, mealtimes, exercise, medication, and also broaches the subject of cars and driving." -- The Nashville News

"A collection of tried-and-true techniques, shortcuts, and resources to help patients and their caregivers. Arranged in categories of daily activities for easy reference, the book covers everything from 'Making Your Home Safe and Accessible' to 'Looking Good and Feeling Better.'" -- Fifty Plus

"Her advice on making a home safe and accessible for those with the disease could be applicable to others with limited mobility. The book offers tips, techniques, shortcuts, and resources useful to those who have the disease, as well as their family, friends and caregivers." -- Orange County Home

"...simply written and well organized. The information provided will be useful for people who are newly diagnosed with Parkinson's disease and are having difficulty restructuring their lives as well as caregivers who need some creative ideas and helpful resources." -- Doody's Book Reviews

"There is also PD-specific ideas for decorating, cleaning, and cooking; suggestions for maintaining health; resource lists for every ingredient and implement you'll ever need, etc. This is a very useful reference book." -- The PDF News

"For easy reference, the book is categorized according to daily activities...The book is easy reading and the result of interviews with people with PD and the healthcare professionals and caergivers who care for them...Parkinson's Disease: 300 Tips for Making Life Easier is an excellent resource guide for people with PD and their caregviers and would be a good addition to the consumer health library."--CAPHIS Consumer Health Connections

Reviewer: Joel Havemann, BA(Los Angeles Times)
Description: Parkinson's Disease: 300 Tips in fact spells out 355 ideas (some duplicative) to help those with the disease and those who help people with the disease cope with it, along with helpful lists of available resources. Part of a series that also includes multiple sclerosis (which the author has), the new Parkinson's handbook updates a 2002 edition with new tips.
Purpose: The author's goal is to help people cope with Parkinson's, certainly a laudable objective. She brings the welcome perspective of a patient (although she does not have Parkinson's herself) as opposed to that of a healthcare professional, many of whom have included similar information in their books explaining what is known medically about Parkinson's. Perhaps inevitably, however, I found most of her 355 tips to be either obvious (don't fill your drinking glass to the rim if you have a tremor) or inappropriate to my circumstances.
Audience: The book is written for both Parkinson's patients and their caregivers — an important inclusion, since caregivers are often the forgotten victims of the disease. Some of the tips, however, seem aimed at the newly diagnosed, while the majority are for much more advanced patients, those who need a wheelchair and have trouble getting food to mouth. That the author has multiple sclerosis and not Parkinson's makes her no less of an authority; the diseases are similar, and the author has learned from the more than 100 Parkinson's patients, caregivers and healthcare professionals she has interviewed.
Features: The lists of resources for Parkinson's patients and the inclusion of tips for caregivers are among the innovative features of the book. Its major shortcoming is its uncertainty about the stage of its readers' disease. The author acknowledges that readers might not be able to handle the advanced Parkinson's sufferers they might encounter in support groups. But a great many of its tips are aimed at patients with advanced symptoms, and newer patients might not want to be told to check in advance whether a prospective hotel accommodates wheelchairs or to eat baby foods because they're easy to swallow.
Assessment: The book has many of the pluses and minuses of other handbooks on coping with Parkinson's (including the American Parkinson Disease Association's Coping with Parkinson's Disease, Susan B. Levin, editor). It includes some useful suggestions, but to be inclusive of readers with a wide variety of symptoms, it necessarily has many tips that are inappropriate to many readers. In particular, the book would be more effective if it could isolate its tips for advanced patients from its suggestions for new ones. The lists of relevant resources at the end of each chapter justifies replacing the first edition with the second.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781932603538
Publisher:
Springer Publishing Company
Publication date:
06/06/2006
Series:
300 Tips for Making Life Easier Series
Edition description:
Second Edition
Pages:
140
Sales rank:
325,827
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.40(d)

Meet the Author

Shelley Peterman Schwarz and her husband, Dave, live in Madison, Wisconsin. At the time of her diagnosis in 1979, Shelley was working part-time as a teacher of the deaf. Since 1985 she has published more than 300 articles and received numerous awards including the Mother of the Year from the Wisconsin Chapter of the National MS Society, the Partner in Health award from the Combined Health Appeal of America, and the Spirit of the American Woman award from J.C. Penney. Her nationally syndicated, ""Making Life Easier"" column appears in numerous newspapers and magazines across the country.

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