Parrots For Dummies [NOOK Book]

Overview

Covers feeding, training, and housing parrots

All the guidance you need to choose and raise your parrot

Thinking about getting a parrot? This friendly guide offers expert advice on everything from taming and training to nutrition, health ...

See more details below
Parrots For Dummies

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.49
BN.com price
(Save 38%)$16.99 List Price
Note: This NOOK Book can be purchased in bulk. Please email us for more information.

Overview

Covers feeding, training, and housing parrots

All the guidance you need to choose and raise your parrot

Thinking about getting a parrot? This friendly guide offers expert advice on everything from taming and training to nutrition, health care, and parrot safety. You'll see how to keep your feathered friend comfortable and entertained — and you'll better understand the hows and whys of your parrot's instincts and behavior.

Discover how to

  • Select a healthy parrot
  • Choose proper housing
  • Teach your parrot to talk
  • Correct behavior problems
  • Keep multiple parrots
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781118054499
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 3/4/2011
  • Series: For Dummies Series
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 246,607
  • File size: 28 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Nikki Moustaki is the author of many books on parrots and avian behavior. She writes regularly for Bird Talk Magazine and Pet Product News.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Parrots For Dummies


By Nikki Moustaki

John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0-7645-8353-0


Chapter One

Meet the Parrots

In This Chapter

* Introducing the parrots

* Creating a good parrot home

* Reflecting a bit on parrot behavior

* Making friends with your parrot

Welcome to the wonderful world of parrots. Okay, it may be wonderful, but it's not utopia. There's a lot to know and a lot to do in order to make a parrot happy and keep it healthy in the average home. This chapter gives you an overview of this entire book and shows you where to look for the important information you'll need to get started with parrots.

An Introduction to Parrots

If parrots were human, they'd be supermodels. They'd want their spring water and their carrot sticks, and they'd want them now. Parrots are beautiful, temperamental creatures that need a lot of handling from a good manager - that's you, the parrot's guardian - to make sure they're treated right (Figure 1-1). It's in the fine print of the parrot's contract: You will do the bird's bidding, and you won't ask any questions.

Well, doing the bird's bidding sounds a little un-fun, doesn't it? I don't mean that you're the bird's servant, though it can sometimes feel that way. What I mean is that parrots have a lot of requirements that need to be met or else. The or else means high veterinary bills, a very unhappy parrot, and perhaps even a dead bird. The or else isn't aplace you want to go.

You have to feed the parrot right, house it right, and give it your full and total attention. You have to provide it with toys, friends, things to do, health care, and everything else it needs. It's a complicated companion, far more so than a dog or cat. If you read this book cover to cover, you'll have a great handle on how to properly care for your bird.

From pet to companion

The first and most important thing to know about parrots is that they're not like other pets. They're companions. And you're not the owner. You're the guardian. This is the vocabulary I use throughout this book. The language you use to describe other people is how you perceive and relate to them, and the same goes for the language you use to describe the animals in your life. You can find out more about this in Chapter 2.

A little bit of wilderness

Having a parrot in your home is like bringing a little bit of the rainforest, grasslands, or plains inside. A parrot is a wild animal and always will be, no matter where it lives. When you live with a parrot, you have the unique responsibility of caring for a truly natural creature, one that hasn't been domesticated in any way. Captive parrots and wild parrots share the exact same instincts. See Chapter 11 for more details on how instincts inform your parrot's behavior.

REMEMBER

Some parrots are indeed easier to care for than others. Which parrot you choose should depends on how much space and time you have. There's never really enough time in the day to give a larger parrot the attention it wants. Smaller parrots, such as parakeets and lovebirds, are often kept happily in pairs, which is a great option. Large parrots love each other's company as well. Since parrots are social, flock-oriented animals, they like to be together. Chapter 3 gives you the lowdown on which parrot species might be right for you (Figure 1-2). Chapter 4 shows you how to choose a healthy parrot from the right kind of place.

Home Tweet Home

The average home must be modified to accommodate a parrot, whether it's a little budgie or a large macaw. You've got to parrot-proof your home the way you'd kid-proof it for toddlers. Parrots can get into even more trouble than toddlers, because not only can a parrot open the cupboard under the sink, but it can also get up to the cupboard above the refrigerator. It can eat through drywall, pick at the chipping paint near the window, and dunk itself in the toilet. It can get outside and never come back again. Parrot-proofing is crucial. See Chapter 7 for parrot-proofing ideas.

Making birdy comfortable

After you've parrot-proofed, you've got to find acceptable housing for your bird. In parrot circles, the idiom bigger is better is applied to bird cages, aviaries, and habitats. Birds are meant to fly, so it's great if you can offer a safe flying space. Flying is essential for healthy respiratory, muscular, and skeletal systems.

TIP

Where you place the bird's housing is also crucial. Parrots like a secure spot close to a wall, out of drafts, and in a room where there's a lot of traffic. It's a lonely and miserable bird that's relegated to the garage or a back room. Chapter 5 gives you lots of housing do's and don'ts.

Parrot paraphernalia

Once you've decided on housing, you need a lot of parrot paraphernalia. Fortunately, manufacturers of birdy stuff have gotten incredibly creative over the years, and there's a cornucopia of parrot accessories out there that will make your bird more comfortable, give him things to do, and perhaps even save his life. Check out Chapter 6 for your parrot shopping guide.

Parrot Care 101

There's a lot more to know about parrot care than tossing some seed and water into a cage and hoping for the best. Those days are over (thankfully). Much research has been done on parrot health and nutrition in the last couple of decades, bringing parrot people to a new level of awareness and allowing parrots to live longer, healthier lives. Though some species of parrots are long-lived, some with a lifespan of more than 80 years, most don't even make it past a decade. The information throughout this book shows you how to ensure that your parrot lives out its full lifespan. Most people think that budgies (parakeets) only live a few years. With the proper care, budgies can actually live to be well over 15.

Health care

Parrots are complex organisms that have very different systems than humans do. Things that don't bother humans at all can kill a bird instantly. For example, the fumes from nonstick cookware, avocadoes, and aerosol sprays are deadly for birds. But by far the most deadly thing for birds is lack of proper health care. Getting your parrot to a certified avian veterinarian is crucial to keeping it healthy and alive. Check out Chapter 10 for more information on illness. While you're at it, don't skip over Chapter 9: grooming.

Nutrition

WARNING!

By far the deadliest thing for most parrots is poor nutrition. A parrot that's suffering from vitamin and mineral deficiency has a weakened immune system and is susceptible to many diseases and ailments, not to mention behavioral problems. Read Chapter 8 for a lot of good tips on proper parrot nutrition.

Parrot Behavior

It's too bad parrots don't come with owner's manuals - well, until now. You've got a great one in your hand. But as with just about everything, you're going to learn about parrot behavior by trial and error. If your parrot bites you, hopefully you'll figure out what caused the bite and won't repeat the events leading up to the incident. Chapter 11 gives you some insight into wild parrot behavior and why your "wild child" behaves the way it does.

Normal behaviors

Some behaviors that seem really odd are actually quite normal. You can't try to understand parrots by using human intuition. It's very easy to anthropomorphize parrots, giving them human qualities. They definitely do some things that seem quite human. But for the most part, the things they do are all part of a complex communication that's really designed for other parrots. From body language to vocalization, your parrot's behaviors all mean something. The key is to get inside that feathered head and figure out what the parrot is trying to tell you. Check out Chapter 12 for more on normal parrot behavior, body language, and vocalization. Chapter 15 is all about parrot intelligence and will help you understand your feathered pal as well.

The parrot monster

Some of the behaviors that are normal for parrots can be annoying or baffling to their human guardians - screaming, plucking, biting, beak banging - it's enough to make a human guardian pull her own hair out. Because parrots aren't really meant to be kept inside a home, they can come up with some terrible behaviors due to frustration and loneliness. Chapter 14 fills you in on how to handle birds gone wild and gives you options for getting help.

Parrot Pals

Most people want a tame, hands-on parrot companion. Some people do have watching only birds, generally the smaller parrots, but when it comes to the medium to large parrots, it seems that guardians are really looking for a friend. That's great, actually, because parrots bond well to gentle, kind humans who have their best interest at heart and behave accordingly. But remember, the road to hell is paved with good intentions. You can't just intend to do right by your parrot - you actually have to walk the walk.

Making friends with your parrot

Check out Chapter 16 for advice and step-by-step tips on taming and training that will help you make good friends with your parrot and help you have the correct expectations. Most relationships go bad when expectations exceed actuality. In a parrot/human relationship, it's usually the parrot that loses, which is pretty tragic for him. This chapter helps you learn to create trust and a lasting bond with your bird.

And baby makes three

Breeding parrots is not a great idea, for a variety of good reasons. First, there are way too many homeless parrots already, most in shelters or sanctuaries that are full to capacity. Second, breeding birds is a risky business - your veterinary bills will far exceed any money you make, and you put your parent birds in danger of illness and death, not to mention how delicate the babies are. And finally, the endeavor is one of the most time-consuming things you'll ever undertake.

That said, some of the smaller birds - such as budgies, lovebirds, and cockatiels - have a healthy following of hobbyists who do breed them for show (Figure 1-3). If you're interested in this, or you just want to find out how your parrot came to be, check out Chapter 17.

A Caveat to the Wise

Hundreds of books about parrot care and behavior are on the market, and there are hundreds of Web sites. Everyone has a slightly different way of doing things and a slightly different parrot philosophy. There are different parrot camps, each with its own intense convictions. I try my best here to offer you a variety of viewpoints. Mainly, I focus on what has worked for me all these years working with parrots, both my own and those of my clients in my care and behavior practice.

You're not going to find absolutely everything you need to know about parrots in this book. This book is a great primer to get you started on the right foot, and even intermediate and advanced parrot people will find some valuable information here. In any case, you're going to run into situations that you may not know how to handle, and perhaps you'll remember something from this book that will help you deal with the problem or at least point you to a good reference where you can get some help.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from Parrots For Dummies by Nikki Moustaki Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction.

Part I: Your Wild Child: Introducing the Parrot.

Chapter 1: Meet the Parrots.

Chapter 2: Expectations of a Companion Parrot.

Chapter 3: Choosing the Right Companion.

Chapter 4: Purchasing and Adopting a Parrot.

Part II: Bringing Home Your New Parrot.

Chapter 5: A House to Call Home: Choosing Proper Housing.

Chapter 6: Let’s Go Shopping! Avian Supplies and Accessories.

Chapter 7: Bringing Home Birdy: Introductions and Parrot-Proofing Your Home.

Part III: Caring for Your Parrot.

Chapter 8: Eating Like a Bird: Proper Parrot Nutrition.

Chapter 9: Pretty Bird! Grooming Your Companion.

Chapter 10: In Sickness and in Health.

Part IV: Parrot Behavior Made Simple.

Chapter 11: Understanding Your Wild Child’s Instincts.

Chapter 12: Normal Companion Parrot Behaviors.

Chapter 13: Multiple Parrot Households.

Chapter 14: When Good Birds Go Bad.

Part V: Taming, Training, and Beyond.

Chapter 15: Bird Brains: Parrot Intelligence.

Chapter 16: Taming and Training Your Parrot.

Chapter 17: Breeding Parrots.

Chapter 18: In the Ring: Showing Your Parrot.

Part VI: The Part of Tens.

Chapter 19: Ten Things All Parrots Should Know.

Chapter 20: Ten Ways to Entertain Your Parrot.

Chapter 21: Ten + Travel Tips.

Index.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 8 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(5)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2008

    A reviewer

    This is one of my top three books of all time about parrots. I have read anything and everything I can find on the subject of caring for parrots in captivity, and this book is beyond exceptional. It is well-written, understandable, enjoyable and most of all, will help give you and your parrot the best possible life together. Nikki is very knowledgeable and experienced with parrots and is a top-rate author.

    9 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 6, 2012

    Thinking of buying a parrot? Bought a parrot and feel like you

    Thinking of buying a parrot? Bought a parrot and feel like you may be a little uninformed as to your new pets care and needs? Or did you rescue a parrot and think maybe you're in over your head? This is a great book to start your education. It touches on every aspect of parrot guardianship and offers recommendations for increasing your knowledge base. The author not only keeps parrots but also keeps and trains dogs, and thus writes from not just a "parrot" perspective. It's comprehensive in approach to the subject and accessible to anyone who truly wants to educate themselves in parrot guardianship. If you're thinking of acquiring a parrot companion, READ THIS BOOK FIRST, cover to cover.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2013

    Good info funny anicdotes

    Lots of information great for bird people. Not much about training other thanpositive reinforcement. But a MUST for knowing what is good and bad as far as food, and socializing your pet. Great book must have for getting a new parrot

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)