Parsifal's Page (The Squire's Tales Series #4) [NOOK Book]

Overview

Piers is desperate to become a page to escape the dirty, tedious labor of his father’s blacksmith shop. So when a knight arrives announcing that he’s on “the quest,” Piers begs to go along. Off on a series of adventures he never dreamed possible, Piers and the knight quickly run into difficulties. The knight is slain by Parsifal who is on a quest of his own.
Parsifal is unlike anyone Piers has ever met. He doesn’t behave “knightly” at all. Slowly, Piers realizes that being a ...
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Parsifal's Page (The Squire's Tales Series #4)

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Overview

Piers is desperate to become a page to escape the dirty, tedious labor of his father’s blacksmith shop. So when a knight arrives announcing that he’s on “the quest,” Piers begs to go along. Off on a series of adventures he never dreamed possible, Piers and the knight quickly run into difficulties. The knight is slain by Parsifal who is on a quest of his own.
Parsifal is unlike anyone Piers has ever met. He doesn’t behave “knightly” at all. Slowly, Piers realizes that being a knight has nothing to do with shining armor and winning jousts. And, as their journey continues, they find that to achieve their quest they must learn more than knighthood: they must learn about themselves.
The tale of Parsifal has been told more than that of any other knight, but no one has ever told his story quite like Gerald Morris does in his fourth Arthurian novel, another tour de force of humor, action, magic, and, as always, true love.

In medieval England, eleven-year-old Piers' dream comes true when he becomes page to Parsifal, a peasant whose quest for knighthood reveals important secrets about both of their families.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
On the day that eleven-year-old Piers' (who wants to be called Pierre) blacksmith father tries to teach him to make nails, Piers sets out instead to become the page for a knight. His dream has finally come true—getting trained to become a squire—but Piers' knight is instead slain by Parsifal, a strangely innocent, gentle man on a quest. Parsifal is in search "of great deeds to do" to become a knight, but knows little about how to become one. He asks every question that comes into his head, a most unknightly thing to do, thinks Piers. Piers is charmed by a fairy named Ariel, and soon learns that Parsifal, who grew up in the forest, passes easily between the World of Men and the World of Fairies. Piers and Parsifal are drawn into the Quest for the Holy Grail, where they enter the adventurous worlds of Sir Gawain, Sir Trevisant, King Anfortas and more, and cross between the two worlds. Through many brave adventures, they both learn about their origins and receive lessons about the intangible rewards of life versus accomplishing mighty deeds. In his fourth novel, Gerald Morris again delights readers with the fantasy of the Arthurian world through his wry, witty storytelling style, spiced with modern-day dialogue. Written as a delightful comedy with serious messages, this book, like the previous three, will entertain both young and old alike. 2001, Houghton Mifflin, $15.00. Ages 11 up. Reviewer: Elaine Wick
VOYA
I personally think that this book is for younger readers who like fast reading and low vocabulary usage. It informs them with a few facts about medieval times. It has excitement, adventure, and keeps my interest. I would like the author to write more about Gawain and Terrance, characters who appeared in the first two books. VOYA CODES: 3Q 4P M J (Readable without serious defects; Broad general YA appeal; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9). 2001, Houghton Mifflin, 240p, Ages 12 to 15. Reviewer: Kelsey Sands, Teen Reviewer SOURCE: VOYA, June 2001 (Vol. 24, No. 2)
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-As he did in The Squire's Tale (Houghton, 1998), the author retells a knight's legend from the perspective of his helper and companion. In this entertaining and substantive story, Piers's wanderlust takes him to the court of King Arthur where he meets up with a lost soul, Parsifal, who longs to be a knight. Piers's mother has regaled him with stories of her life as a maid-in-waiting at the French court, so he has grown up with lofty ideas and the ambition to become a knight's page. Parsifal is clearly in need of his expertise. Readers familiar with the legend will recognize the main events. After Parsifal fails to ask "the" question and realizes his mistake, he continues his Grail quest alone, and Piers joins Sir Gawain and his page on further adventures, thus continuing the story begun in The Squire's Tale. Piers's overly earnest attempts to do the right thing and Gawain's wit provide most of the humor in the story, but the author avoids cheapening the significance of the Grail quest. Readers unfamiliar with Parsifal and Gawain's stories may wish for a "who's who" to keep up with the characters, but the sheer fun of this novel will keep them going. Unfortunately, the cover art looks like a video game and doesn't fit the story. Once past it, Arthurian fans will be hooked by the great writing. Katherine Paterson's Parzival (Dutton, 1998) is a more traditional retelling that would appeal to similar readers.-Cheri Estes, Detroit Country Day School Middle School, Beverly Hills, MI Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Morris (The Savage Damsel and the Dwarf, 2000, etc.) serves up another engaging take on Arthurian legend. Discarding the religious accretions overlaying the Grail quest, he renders it both simpler and more mysterious. Parsifal, who appeared briefly as a rustic strongman in earlier Morris tales, must now mold himself into the Round Table's greatest knight. Yet Parsifal's transformation is secondary to that of Piers who, longing for French courtly glamour, rejects his father's efforts to teach him smithcraft, renames himself Pierre, and latches onto a passing knight as his page. When his first knight proves a disappointment, Piers reluctantly engages to tutor the uncouth Parsifal in courtesy. While Piers is astonished at Parsifal's knightly prowess, the page's snobbish insistence on strict propriety leads his master to disaster. Cast aside, Piers embarks on another quest, to redeem Parsifal's failure-and his own. While the story stands on its own, it leads to predictable territory for fans of the series, as Piers is guided by Sir Gawain, Squire Terence, and other familiar faces to value true honor and courage. Morris deftly blends bloody clashes of arms and mysterious enchantments with the many flavors (sweet, bitter, and spicy) of romance, generously seasoned with wry humor and a dash of unexpected pathos. An elegiac air overhangs Camelot, as if the gracious morning of chivalry yields to a more robust yet mundane day. In his witty Author's Note, Morris confesses that he doesn't know what the tale means; but he loves it. So will the reader. (Fiction. 10-15)
From the Publisher
"Entertaining . . . Arthurian fans will be hooked by the great writing. " School Library Journal

"Libraries where Morris's Arthurian series has a following will certainly want to add this to their fiction collections." Booklist, ALA

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780547349527
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 4/28/2008
  • Series: Squire's Tales Series , #4
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 205,860
  • Age range: 10 - 14 Years
  • File size: 129 KB

Meet the Author

When Gerald Morris was in fifth grade he loved Greek and Norse mythology and before long was retelling the stories to his younger sister and then to neighborhood kids. He began carrying a notebook in which he kept some of the details related to the different stories. The joy he found in retelling those myths continued when he discovered other stories. According to Gerald Morris, “I never lost my love of retelling the old stories. When I found Arthurian literature, years later, I knew at once that I wanted to retell those grand tales. So I pulled out my notebook . . . I retell the tales, peopling them with characters that I at least find easier to recognize, and let the magic of the Arthurian tradition go where it will.” Gerald Morris lives in Wausau, Wisconsin, with his wife and their three children. In addition to writing he serves as a minister in a church.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 8 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 9 of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2008

    To be Read Over and Over

    I just finished this book for the second time in about a year and a half. I picked it up the first time because my brother reccommended it to me. Immeadiatly, I was sucked into the story and witnessed every event firsthand thanks to Gerald Morris's incredible style of writing. After I finished I said, WOW. A year and a half later I had basicly forgotten the plot except for the main details, so I started it again. I then was sucked into the book again. It rests in my top 50 of best books I've ever read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2004

    Awesome!

    I absolutely loved this book. A book with a lot of charm. Fantastic tale about King Arthur and the round table. Wonderful adventures. Great bits of humor along the way. So well told that you would swear it actually happened.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2004

    a very great book!!

    this book is one of the best books about king arthur. it's one of my favorites.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2012

    Cool

    A great book. I reccomend it to everyone!

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  • Posted March 21, 2011

    ???

    what do you think?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2002

    Great book

    Great book, I liked it so much I read it all in one night. Filled with ups and downs as you follow a young boy through his journies and adventures as a page. Interesting lore and plot twists throughout the book. Not as clear as I would have liked it to be, it got a little difficult to follow about 3/4 of the way through, but it all makes sense in the end. A story that truly sucks you in and keeps you interested, I highly recommend it!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 12, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 9 of 8 Customer Reviews

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