Party Monster

Party Monster

4.6 5
     
 
Party Monster tells the true tale of Michael Alig, a high-living New York club kid (Macaulay Culkin) accused of murdering his drug dealer/roommate (Seth Green). The soundtrack aims to capture the decadence of the era -- the ecstasy-fueled mid-'90s -- at least in spirit if not entirely in time. Period club tracks are naturals, from innocent '80s pop hits such as

Overview

Party Monster tells the true tale of Michael Alig, a high-living New York club kid (Macaulay Culkin) accused of murdering his drug dealer/roommate (Seth Green). The soundtrack aims to capture the decadence of the era -- the ecstasy-fueled mid-'90s -- at least in spirit if not entirely in time. Period club tracks are naturals, from innocent '80s pop hits such as Stacey Q's pulsing "Two of Hearts" and Shannon's soul-inspired "Give Me Tonight" to Hi-NRG barn burners like ABC's crisp synth-pop "How to Be a Millionaire" and Stephen "Tin Tin" Duffy's bouncy "Kiss Me" to more underground dance-floor nuggets such as Tones on Tail's handclap-happy "Go!" and Nina Hagen's quirky, punky "New York, New York" (an edgy original, not a cover). In the absence of actual '90s club cuts from Junior Vasquez or Danny Tenaglia, the rest of the disc features heady tracks drawn from the early '00s electro-clash scene -- a harder, retro-fied spin on house -- tunes with beats as sharp as their lyrics. The slippery rhythms snaking through Keoki's "Crash" create a fierce undertow, while the X-rated lyrics emanating from Miss Kitten & the Hacker on the raw "Frank Sinatra" paint an entirely different "New York, New York." Things come to a head on a Felix Da Housecat vs. Pop Tarts' fist-pumping "Money, Success, Fame, Glamour," which features vocals from Culkin, Green, and costar Chloe Sevigny and could very well be the film's own mantra.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Andy Kellman
Party Monster revolves around the late-'80s/early-'90s New York club scene. Its soundtrack only reflects that fact somewhat. Sleazy electro-pop that was made well outside the time frame of this scene -- Miss Kittin & the Hacker's naughty "Frank Sinatra," Ladytron's sleek "Seventeen" -- falls in with a somewhat wide variety of songs from the '80s -- ABC's suave "How to Be a Millionaire," Stacey Q's chirpy "Two of Hearts." It had a chance to be the kind of soundtrack that works outside the context of the film, accurately covering a specific scene from a specific point in time, but it wound up being another disc that can mainly relates to those who enjoyed the movie.
Rolling Stone - Barry Walters
Crafty song selections reflect the film's plot and themes like the mirror of a cocaine-smeared compact.

Product Details

Release Date:
09/02/2003
Label:
Tvt
UPC:
0016581668027
catalogNumber:
6680
Rank:
131527

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Marilyn Manson   Guest Appearance

Technical Credits

Nina Hagen   Composer
Bill Coleman   Executive Producer,Associate Supervisor
Daniel Ash   Composer
Stephen Duffy   Composer
John Mitchell   Composer
Chris Barbosa   Composer
Martin Fry   Composer
Kevin Haskins   Composer
Karl Rucker   Composer
Lovis Scalise   Composer
Steve Schiff   Composer
Mark White   Composer
Fenton Bailey   Director,Writer,Executive Producer
Randy Barbato   Director,Writer,Executive Producer
John Schmidt   Executive Producer
Macaulay Culkin   Contributor
Chloe Sevigny   Contributor
James St. James   Book
Howard Paar   Executive Producer
Keoki Franconi   Composer
Jonathan Marcus   Producer
Larry Tee   Composer
Ed Chisolm   Composer
Wilson Cruz   Contributor
A. Baker   Composer
A.J. Bond   Composer
Glen Campling   Composer
Jackie Sussman   Business Consultant,Legal Counsel
Christine Vachon   Producer
Edward Pressman   Executive Producer
Michel Amato   Composer
Natasha Lyonne   Contributor
Caroline Herve   Composer
Greg Perry   Composer
Vitalic   Composer
Seth Green   Contributor
John Wells   Executive Producer

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Party Monster 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
badandy More than 1 year ago
Michael Alig did not kill James St. James - He killed Angel. Linda Vanderloo should have watched the movie
Guest More than 1 year ago
I love this album. It's great. Finally something that can almost bring you back to the good ol party days. A must have for anyone into club music.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Absolutely great! I couldn't stop listening to this after I bought it. If you're a fan of the movie, you'll probably like the soundtrack. Point blank, this is just a really great, fun album (and I'm not even in to club music). The only mistake is w.i.t.'s "inside out": corny, annoying pseudo-song that leaves a hole in this otherwise perfect soundtrack. Still, definitely worth buying!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago