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Passage of Time
     

Passage of Time

by Joshua Redman
 
In the spotlight since he burst on the scene in 1993, the tenor saxophonist Joshua Redman has never enjoyed the safety net of anonymity that allows developing young musicians to go out on the high wire without fear of failure, to smooth out the rough patches in the arduous course of developing a sound. Yet Redman has never rested on his laurels or played it safe;

Overview

In the spotlight since he burst on the scene in 1993, the tenor saxophonist Joshua Redman has never enjoyed the safety net of anonymity that allows developing young musicians to go out on the high wire without fear of failure, to smooth out the rough patches in the arduous course of developing a sound. Yet Redman has never rested on his laurels or played it safe; each of his albums shows him reaching for another level. Redman doesn't disappoint on the kaleidoscopic Passage of Time, an extended suite of original music for tenor saxophone and rhythm section. With a centered tone and unerring time, he creates elegant melodies within complex structures and makes rhythm speak; his vocabulary draws from the lyricism of John Coltrane, the cool flame of Joe Henderson, the blues sophistication of Eddie Harris. His talented cohorts (Aaron Goldberg, piano; Reuben Rogers, bass; Gregory Hutchinson, drums) are in sync every step of the way, pushing, prodding, and complementing the flow.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Richard S. Ginell
With this recording, Joshua Redman attempts a long-form composition for the first time, a series of eight numbers that form a cycle of sorts. The promotional buzz claimed that Redman was taking stock of his music ten years after winning the Thelonious Monk competition, the event that had the effect of launching him full-blown into the big time. Whether or not that's true, there is a predominantly reflective, thoughtful tone about this quartet session, split between written-out passages and flat-out improvisations. The whole thing runs for a continuous yet comfortable 52 minutes, an extension of the interlude idea that Redman played with on Timeless Tales. Now and then, Redman takes up the threads of motifs heard earlier -- "Time," for example, offers a more elaborate statement of the motif that opens "Free Speech, Phase II: Discussion" -- and his point of view is often questioning, reflective, and introspective. Pianist Aaron Goldberg, bassist Reuben Rogers, and drummer Gregory Hutchinson are full partners in this journey; occasionally, Goldberg and Rogers provide individual solo links between the selections and Hutchinson keeps things relatively fresh by mixing up the rhythms. That said, it's hard to get really worked up about much of the material presented here; there isn't much that really touches or inflames the listener in a deep way. It's a summing up -- a coherent, mature statement in a familiar mainstream language.
Pulse!
The music's easy to listen to.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/27/2001
Label:
Warner Bros / Wea
UPC:
0093624799726
catalogNumber:
47997

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