The Passport [NOOK Book]

Overview

'Just as the father in the house in which we live is our father, so Comrade Nicolae Ceausescu is the father of our country. And just as the mother in the house in which we live is our mother, so Comrade Elena Ceausescu is the mother of our country. Comrade Nicolae Ceasescu is the father of our children. All the children love comrade Nicolae and comrade Elena, because they are their parents.'





The Passport is a beautiful, haunting novel whose subject is a German village in Romania caught between the stifling ...

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The Passport

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Overview

'Just as the father in the house in which we live is our father, so Comrade Nicolae Ceausescu is the father of our country. And just as the mother in the house in which we live is our mother, so Comrade Elena Ceausescu is the mother of our country. Comrade Nicolae Ceasescu is the father of our children. All the children love comrade Nicolae and comrade Elena, because they are their parents.'





The Passport is a beautiful, haunting novel whose subject is a German village in Romania caught between the stifling hopelessness of Ceaucescu's dictatorship and the glittering temptations of the West. Stories from the past are woven together with the problems Windisch, the village miller, faces after he applies for permission to migrate to West Germany. Herta Müller describes with poetic attention the dreams and superstitions, conflicts and oppression of a forgotten region, the Banat, in the Danube Plain. In sparse, poetic language, Herta Müller captures the forlorn plight of a trapped people.





Translated by Martin Chalmers.



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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This English-language debut by a Romanian-born West Berliner is remarkable for its stylistic purity. Muller's angry tale of an ethnic German anxious to emigrate from his stultifying Romanian village is relayed in deceptively straightforward sentences (``Katharina had sold her winter coat for ten slices of bread. Her stomach was a hedgehog. Every day Katharina picked a bunch of grass. The grass soup was warm and good'') that pile up in striking patterns (later, ``the second snow came. . . . The hedgehog stabbed''). Intently focused prose animates the parochial town with its corrupt power brokers, gamey folk songs and a tree reputed to have eaten its own apples, as well as the problematic relations among the central character, his embittered wife and their nubile daughter, who, like her mother before her during the war, is forced to grant sexual favors to men of privilege. (Jan.)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781847652492
  • Publisher: Profile Books Limited
  • Publication date: 9/30/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 493,120
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Herta Müller was born in Timis, Romania in 1953. A vocal member of the German minority, she was forced to leave the country in 1987, and moved to Berlin, where she still lives. This edition of The Passport was the first publication of Müller's work in English. She is the 2009 winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature.


Herta Muller was born in Timis, Romania in 1953. A vocal memeber of the German minority, she was forced to leave the country in 1987. In that year, she went to west Berlin where she now lives. She was recently awarded the prestigious Ricarda-Huch Prize. Her books have been translated into all European languages - this edition of The Passport is the first publication of Herta Muller in English.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 15 )
Rating Distribution

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(2)

4 Star

(8)

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Sort by: Showing all of 15 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 7, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    This is a translation of a 1980s indictment of Ceausescu and the Communists who destroyed Romania economically and morally

    During the brutal reign of Ceausescu, Windisch wants out of his German village in Romania. In fact he wants out of the country that feels everywhere in his mind as the end instead of a beginning or even a middle. The coffin with the Widow Kroner's name on it symbolizes how he feels as the box remains empty waiting for her to die. Last year to gain a passport to go to West Berlin, he tried bribing the mayor with sacks of flour, but that only left him hungry. The village miller has tried using his daughter and his bitter wife, but so far has been rejected for the passport he needs to go to the west. Amalie with her crystal vase and Katharina who survived five Russian winters by selling her coat and more to make grass soup struggle in the village where women survive by sexual favors to the male elite.

    This is a translation of a 1980s indictment of Ceausescu and the Communists who destroyed Romania economically and morally. To survive under the reign even in a tiny remote village, one had to bribe the leaders with whatever one had to include a pretty daughter. The cast makes the tale work while the stark grim brusque writing will stun the audience with its deep message that tyranny at any level destroys.

    Harriet Klausner

    8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 15, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Amazing

    Undeniably brilliant

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2010

    take the time to read it

    The writing style is original and touching since I was born in Romania

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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