BN.com Gift Guide

The Pastor: A Memoir

( 10 )

Overview

In The Pastor, Eugene H. Peterson, the translator of the multimillion-selling The Message and the author of more than thirty books, offers his life story as one answer to the surprisingly neglected question: What does it mean to be a pastor?

When Peterson was asked by his denomination to begin a new church in Bel Air, Maryland, he surprised himself by saying yes. And so was born Christ Our King Presbyterian Church. But Peterson quickly learned that he was not exactly sure what a...

See more details below
Paperback
$13.81
BN.com price
(Save 18%)$16.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (20) from $7.64   
  • New (16) from $7.64   
  • Used (4) from $13.60   
The Pastor: A Memoir

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$12.60
BN.com price

Overview

In The Pastor, Eugene H. Peterson, the translator of the multimillion-selling The Message and the author of more than thirty books, offers his life story as one answer to the surprisingly neglected question: What does it mean to be a pastor?

When Peterson was asked by his denomination to begin a new church in Bel Air, Maryland, he surprised himself by saying yes. And so was born Christ Our King Presbyterian Church. But Peterson quickly learned that he was not exactly sure what a pastor should do. He had met many ministers in his life, from his Pentecostal upbringing in Montana to his seminary days in New York, and he admired only a few. He knew that the job's demands would drown him unless he figured out what the essence of the job really was. Thus began a thirty-year journey into the heart of this uncommon vocation—the pastorate.

The Pastor steers away from abstractions, offering instead a beautiful rendering of a life tied to the physical world—the land, the holy space, the people—shaping Peterson's pastoral vocation as well as his faith. He takes on church marketing, mega pastors, and the church's too-cozy relationship to American glitz and consumerism to present a simple, faith-filled job description of what being a pastor means today. In the end, Peterson discovered that being a pastor boiled down to "paying attention and calling attention to 'what is going on right now' between men and women, with each other and with God." The Pastor is destined to become a classic statement on the contemporary trials, joys, and meaning of this ancient vocation.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Eugene H. Peterson (The Jesus Way; Practice Resurrection) thinks of himself as a scholar and a writer and certainly his bibliography of over thirty books supports that predisposition. On the other hand, he never sought to be a pastor. When, in 1962, that position was thrust upon him, he entered the job without metaphorical training wheels, learning step-by-step what he imagined that others knew instinctively. The Pastor is an anecdote-filled memoir of his nearly three decades of his hard-won education. Along the way, Peterson offers telling wisdom about human relations, church marketing, preaching in a mega-church world, and diluting the gospel message in a glitzy secular world.

William Paul Young
“Eugene Peterson excavates the challenges and mysteries regarding pastors and church and gives me hope for both. This a must read for every person who is or thinks they are called to be a pastor and for every person who has one.”
Richard J. Foster
“If anyone knows how to be a pastor in the contemporary context that person is Eugene Peterson. Eugene possesses the rare combination of a pastor’s heart and a pastor’s art. Take and read!”
Philip Yancey
“I’ve been nagging Eugene Peterson for years to write a memoir. In our clamorous, celebrity-driven, entertainment culture, his life and words convey a quiet whisper of sanity, authenticity, and, yes, holiness.”
Englewood Review of Books
“Peterson found writing as a way to pay attention, and as an act of prayer. It’s our privilege to have his words, full of insight and truth. This book might be considered a long prayer for pastors.”
Christianity Today
“A gift to anyone who has tried answering the call to pastor, and to a church that needs true pastors. . . . It is a subtle manifesto of hope for our time.”
Religion & Ethics Newsweekly
“Peterson is a master storyteller. . . . The Pastor is a profound and important meditation . . . serves as a necessary reaffirmation of the true nature of a calling that in current American religious life seems largely lost.”
Seattle Post-Intelligencer
“A book full of much needed wisdom that is written with eloquence.”
Dale T. Irvin
“More than a gifted writer, Eugene Peterson is a voice calling upon the churches to recover the vocation of the pastor in order to experience the renewing of their faith in the midst of an increasingly commercialized, depersonalized, and spiritually barren land.”
Dallas Willard
“If you are hoping to be a pastor, or just to understand what that is, get this book and soak in it for at least three full days with no distraction. It may save your life and make you a blessing.”
Shane Claiborne author of The Irresistible Revolution
“A good book for folks who like pastors. And a good book for folks who don’t. The Pastor is the disarming tale of one of the unlikely suspects who has helped shape North American Christianity.”
author of The Irresistible Revolution - Shane Claiborne
"A good book for folks who like pastors. And a good book for folks who don’t. The Pastor is the disarming tale of one of the unlikely suspects who has helped shape North American Christianity."
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061988219
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 9/18/2012
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 238,694
  • Product dimensions: 6.12 (w) x 8.82 (h) x 0.91 (d)

Meet the Author

Eugene H. Peterson, author of The Message, a bestselling translation of the Bible, is professor emeritus of spiritual theology at Regent College, British Columbia, and the author of over thirty books. He and his wife, Jan, live in Montana.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction: Pastor Pete 1

I Topo and Kairos 7

1 Montana: Sacred Ground and Stories 9

2 New York: Pastor John of Patmos 15

II "Intently Haphazard" 25

3 My Mother's Songs and Stories 27

4 My Father's Butcher Shop 35

5 Garrison Johns 46

6 The Treeless Christmas of 1939 50

7 Uncle Sven 56

8 The Carnegie 61

9 Cousin Abraham 66

10 Mennonite Punch 70

11 Holy Land 72

12 Augustine Njokuobi and Elijah Odajara 80

13 Seminary 84

14 Jan 92

III Shekinah 99

15 Ziklag 103

16 Catacombs Presbyterian Church 108

17 Tuesdays 130

18 Company of Pastors 143

19 Willi Ossa 161

20 Bezalel 167

21 Eucharistic Hospitality 188

22 Apreciation and Follery 197

23 Pilgrimage 204

24 Heather-Scented Theology 209

25 Presbycostal 213

26 Emmaus Walks 218

27 Sister Genevieve 223

28 Eric Liddell 233

29 "Write in a Book What you See…" 237

30 My Ten Secretaries 250

31 Wayne and Claudia 253

32 Jackson 259

33 The Atheist and the Nun 265

34 Judith 270

35 "Invisible Six Days a Week, Incomprehensible the Seventh" 273

IV Good Deaths 289

36 The Next One 291

37 Wind Words 295

38 Fyodor 300

39 The Photograph 304

40 Death in the Desert 310

Afterword: Letter to a Young Pastor 314

Acknowledgments 319

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(5)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 4, 2011

    Excellent Memoir

    This is an excellent memoir written by a great man. Eugene Peterson became famous after publishing his Bible translation "The Message". A pastor himself, he gives encouragement and hope to pastors, especially those who are finding ministry difficult. I really think that all pastors should read this book, but let's not stop there. I think congregations would benefit from this book as well, as it would give them insight into the pastoral role and will change the way you view and treat your pastor. This was a great book.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 29, 2011

    A must read for every pastor - especially us young guys

    This book fed my soul. Peterson masterfully weaves his personal story together with wisdom to American pastors. The book revolves around a decision Peterson made when he first started pastoring to reject the "church growth" models that were gaining popularity and focus on discovering with his congregation what it meant to be a people of God formed by the Spirit of God. How that took shape over the next 29 years of ministry in the same congregation is a beautiful story for all pastors (especially young pastors) to learn from.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 27, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Thank you Pastor Peterson

    I picked up this book because I saw Eugene Peterson speak at the Catalyst Conference; and being at the very beginning of my own pastoral career, I knew I could do well with having some outside voices speak into my situation.

    And you could argue that Eugene is Presbyterian and I am not, that he grew up in a different culture and generation than I did and that the world of ministry looks very different today: all true. But, I don't know if that means that the role that the pastor plays is any different - and I think Eugene would agree.

    The Pastor is not so much a book as it is a story, what I mean is. it's a journey of how Eugene planted a church, grew a congregation, built a sanctuary and traveled through the "badlands" of ministry.

    And as a memoir goes, it had all of the things I was hoping for, funny stories about growing up and being a pastor, how he met his wife, the journey of starting and growing a church, some of his weekly practices, good books he recommends, and some really great biblical application.

    But to read this book is really to read Eugene's story, so it wouldn't be right for me to tell it here, but there are a few of the things that resonated with my own story:

    First, Eugene talks about the role of pastor being a vocation and not a "job." I've said it a million times, the job of being a pastor is one of the weirdest careers of all time. From the outside it doesn't look like any other nine to five on the planet. But Eugene would rather you think of it as a vocation. With a job, you can walk away from it, you can separate your work life from your home life, and certainly Eugene talks about having a Sabbath rest and "getting away" now and then - but a vocation is a calling - it's a lifestyle of living with a community of people. How does one do that?

    Second, Eugene talks about being a "contemplative pastor" and not a "competitive pastor."

    What's the difference?

    A competitive pastor is always looking to the next project, and is constantly "measuring up" their church activity and the spiritual growth of its members. A competitive pastor has an agenda; has goals and is pushing their way towards those goals. But in the end, these are still people's lives. and while we (as pastors) might feel called to "change people" and perhaps feel like a failure if people don't rise to the occasion, tithe more, become prayer warriors, volunteer, help, join in, memorize, or in any other way mature into the mile marker we have set for them. we have to be able to live comfortably within the space God calls us to.

    A contemplative pastor is a pastor who is able to be with people "without having an agenda for them, a pastor who is able to accept people just as they (are) and guide them gently and patiently into a mature life with Christ but not (getting) in the way, (by letting) the Holy Spirit do the guiding." page 211

    And the life of being a pastor is finding the balance of merging these two things together - you and the congregation. Eugene talks about how this merging sometimes breaks. "I had been shifting from being a pastor dealing with God in people's lives to treating them as persons dealing with problems in their lives. I was not being their pastor. I could have helped and still been their pastor. But by reducing them to problems to be fixed, I omitted the biggest thing of all in their lives, God and their souls, and the biggest thing in my life, my vocation as pastor. I was trading in the complexities of

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 31, 2011

    Great Book

    I have always enjoyed Eugene Peterson's writings and find them helpful as a pastor. This book may surpass His others. He is a master with words that express great thoughts and theology.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)