The Path of the Pronghorn

The Path of the Pronghorn

5.0 1
by Cat Urbigkit
     
 

They are the fastest land mammals in North America, clocked at speeds of up to sixty miles per hour. Of all the world's land animals, only cheetahs are faster. When a herd of these animals passes at a run, their pounding hoofs sound like a fire raging across the prairie. These powerful, fast-running creatures are American pronghorn antelope, whose populations are

Overview


They are the fastest land mammals in North America, clocked at speeds of up to sixty miles per hour. Of all the world's land animals, only cheetahs are faster. When a herd of these animals passes at a run, their pounding hoofs sound like a fire raging across the prairie. These powerful, fast-running creatures are American pronghorn antelope, whose populations are found in southwestern Canada, throughout much of the United States, and in northern Mexico. This captivating book follows a herd of Wyoming pronghorn from the sagebrush desert in the spring, to the mountainous high country in summer, and, finally, to lower elevations where the herd returns for winter. The animals follow an ancient cycle. The Wyoming herd has traveled this migration route since the last Ice Age. With a simple, lyrical text, and stunning full-color photographs, this beautiful book offers a fascinating look at the life and behavior of an extraordinary animal.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Beverley Fahey
For over 10,000 years the noble American pronghorn has adhered to a migratory path following the seasons in western Wyoming. This handsome photo essay begins with the birth of a fawn in the sagebrush dessert in spring, follows the herd to the Grand Teton National Park in summer, and back to the lowlands for winter. The fastest land mammals in North America, the pronghorn can reach speeds of up to 60 miles an hour and while it may resemble the African antelope, it has no known close relatives. The simple effective writing reveals many interesting facts about the pronghorn such as even fawns can run very fast (about 25 mph), the animal has four chambers for digesting food; adult females as well as bucks have horns; and their coloring makes it difficult to identify a single animal in a herd. The outstanding format of this book with its full color photos clearly depicting the beauty not only of these animals but also their habitat and the concise writing make this a book to savor. Students may value this for informational research but as a quiet, informational read it stands on its own. Reviewer: Beverley Fahey
School Library Journal
Gr 4–8—Large, eye-catching color photos accompany a quiet, informative text in this elegant book that celebrates an equally elegant North American mammal: Antilocapra americana—"the antelope-goat of America." Urbigkit provides enough quality information to satisfy many young researchers, and Gocke's outstanding photos record the migratory year of Wyoming's Sublette herd. Along the way, such topics as the need for multiple stomachs and cud-chewing are explained, and a fine lesson in migration is shown in the photos and discussed in the text. The role of human construction in deciding the fate of the general pronghorn population is mentioned, as is the small recovery of desert populations in the Southwest. Urbigkit offers further information on a final page, along with a list of adult sources (recent juvenile works are somewhat thin). Handsome, slim, and as fast-paced as the pronghorns themselves, this is a lovely addition.—Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY
Kirkus Reviews
As seasons change, Urbigkit follows the migration cycle of the American pronghorn antelope through western North America. Basic facts such as feeding habits, physical features, threats to the pronghorn and how they care for their young are introduced, as is information on some of the animal's more singular attributes, such as the fact that it is not an antelope at all, despite its name, and a fascinating disquisition on its four-chambered ruminant stomach. Gocke's full-color, often full-page photographs show the pronghorn in action and at rest as they make their 200-mile journey. Detailed close-ups of such features as a dewclaw, fur and horn sheath complement the text. A simple map illustrates the location of the herd population in southwestern Canada, western United States and northern Mexico. Backmatter includes sources and a note on pronghorn-conservation efforts. Full-page color photographs of the pronghorn in spring and winter decorate the endpapers, giving the book a stunning beginning and conclusion that frames the migration path. Animal enthusiasts as well as readers who live near pronghorn populations will find this book especially appealing. (Nonfiction. 8-12)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590787564
Publisher:
Highlights Press
Publication date:
10/01/2010
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,156,851
Product dimensions:
10.20(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
AD1100L (what's this?)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author


Cat Urbigkit is the author and photographer of Brave Dogs, Gentle Dogs: How They Guard Sheep, an IRA Notable Children's Book. She lives in Wyoming.

Mark Gocke works with the Wyoming Game and Fish Department in the area of conservation and education. He lives in Jackson, Wyoming.

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Path of the Pronghorn 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago