The Pathfinder

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Overview

Follow along on this fantastic voyage as Professor Arronax, Ned, and Beth set out to capture a terrifying sea monster--before it captures them.

An adaptation of the nineteenth-century science fiction tale of an electric submarine, its eccentric captain, and the undersea world, which anticipated many of the scientific achievements of the twentieth century.

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The Pathfinder (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading)

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Overview

Follow along on this fantastic voyage as Professor Arronax, Ned, and Beth set out to capture a terrifying sea monster--before it captures them.

An adaptation of the nineteenth-century science fiction tale of an electric submarine, its eccentric captain, and the undersea world, which anticipated many of the scientific achievements of the twentieth century.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

KLIATT
A mysterious creature is roaming the oceans, wreaking havoc on ships. Professor Aronnax, a professor of natural history, joins the crew of the American frigate American Lincoln. Its mission: destroy the sea-beast. Unfortunately the professor, his servant and the ship's harpooner are washed overboard during an encounter with the beastie. They take refuge on its back, which turns out to be a submarine, and become the reluctant guests of Captain Nemo, the master of the Nautilus. Thus begins a journey across the Seven Seas, in the course of which they reach the South Pole, rediscover the sunken continent of Atlantis and engage in a number of sea battles. In the end the Professor and his companions escape; the Nautilus sinks into the Maelstrom, its final fate unknown. This is a fine adaptation of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. Whigham's b/w art is action-oriented and very busy; it does a good job of enlivening Verne's novel, which at time resembles an underwater travel video. The visualization of Captain Nemo, the book's most intriguing character, is particularly good; he is both noble and tormented. Contains comic book violence (most notably a battle with a giant squid); recommended for all readers. KLIATT Codes: JSA—Recommended for junior and senior high school students, advanced students, and adults. 2006, Penguin, Puffin, 176p. illus., Ages 12 to adult.
—George Galuschak
From Barnes & Noble
A pioneer of the now immensely popular genre of fiction we call science fiction, Jules Verne wrote startling adventure stories that not only vividly captured the imagination of the 19th-century reading public, but are still read avidly today. Filled with wondrous voyages, marvelous semi-scientific equipment, and warnings not to tamper too much with the natural order, his novels are not only universally popular, but have proved to be uncannily prophetic. Here are four of Verne's most enthralling stories: 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea, The Mysterious Island, Journey To The Center Of The Earth, and Around The World In 80 Days. Each one explores different themes, but all share one in common: man's exploration of the dark unknown.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780451522573
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 1/28/1961
  • Series: Leatherstocking Tale Series
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: REISSUE
  • Pages: 448
  • Product dimensions: 4.38 (w) x 6.82 (h) x 0.77 (d)

Meet the Author

James Fenimore Cooper
Wayne Franklin is Professor of English at the University of Connecticut.

Biography

James Cooper (he added the Fenimore when he was in his 30s) was born September 15, 1789, in Burlington, New Jersey, to William Cooper and Elizabeth Fenimore Cooper. In 1790 the family moved to the frontier country of upstate New York, where William established a village he called Cooperstown. Although cushioned by wealth and William's status as landlord and judge, the Coopers found pioneering to be rugged, and only 7 of the 13 Cooper children survived their early years. All the hardship notwithstanding, according to family reports, the young James loved the wilderness. Years later, he wrote The Pioneers (1823) about Cooperstown in the 1790s, but many of his other books draw deeply on his childhood experiences of the frontier as well.

Cooper was sent to Yale in 1801 but he was expelled in 1805 for setting off an explosion in another student's room. Afterward, as a midshipman in the fledgling U.S. Navy, he made Atlantic passages and served at an isolated post on Lake Ontario. Cooper resigned his commission in 1811 to marry Susan Augusta De Lancey, the daughter of a wealthy New York State family. During the next decade, however, a series of bad investments and legal entanglements reduced his inheritance to the verge of bankruptcy.

Cooper was already 30 years old when, on a dare from his wife, he became a writer. One evening he threw down, in disgust, a novel he was reading aloud to her, saying he could write a better book himself. Susan, who knew that he disliked writing even letters, expressed her doubts. To prove her wrong he wrote Precaution, which was published anonymously in 1820. Encouraged by favorable reviews, Cooper wrote other books in quick succession, and by the time The Last of the Mohicans, his sixth novel, was published in 1827, he was internationally famous as America's first professionally successful novelist. Eventually he published 32 novels, as well as travel books and histories. Cooper invented the genre of nautical fiction, and in the figure of Nathaniel or "Natty" Bumppo (Hawkeye in The Last of the Mohicans) -- the central character in the five Leatherstocking Tales Cooper published between 1823 and 1841 -- he gave American fiction its first great hero.

Shortly after publishing The Last of the Mohicans, Cooper moved his family to Europe, but in 1833 he returned to America, moving back into his father's restored Mansion House in Cooperstown. He died there on September 14, 1851.

Author biography courtesy of Barnes & Noble Books.

Good To Know

Cooper was expelled from Yale due to his passion for pranks, which included training a donkey to sit in a professor's chair and setting a fellow student's room on fire.

Between 1822 and 1826 Cooper lived in New York City, and was a major player on its intellectual scene. He founded the Bread and Cheese Club, which had many high-profile members, including notable painters of the Hudson River School and writers like William Cullen Bryant.

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    1. Date of Birth:
      September 15, 1789
    2. Place of Birth:
      Burlington, New Jersey
    1. Date of Death:
      September 14, 1851
    2. Place of Death:
      Cooperstown, New York
    1. Education:
      Yale University (expelled in 1805)

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

A Shifting Reef

The year 1866 was marked by a strange event, an unexplainable occurrence which is undoubtedly still fresh in everyone's memory. Those living in coastal towns or in the interior of continents were aroused by all sorts of rumors; but it was seafaring people who were particularly excited. Merchants, shipowners, skippers and masters of Europe and America, naval officers of all countries and the various governments of both continents were deeply concerned over the matter.

Several ships had recently met at sea “an enormous thing,” a long slender object which was sometimes phosphorescent and which was infinitely larger and faster than a whale.

The facts concerning this apparition, entered in various logbooks, agreed closely with one another as to the structure of the object or creature in question, the incredible speed of its movements, the surprising power of its locomotion and the strange life with which it seemed endowed. If it was a member of the whale family, it was larger than any so far classified by scientists. Neither Cuvier, Lacépède, Dumeril nor Quatrefages would have admitted that such a monster could exist--unless they had seen it with their own scientists' eyes.

Taking an average of observations made at different times'and rejecting those timid evaluations which said the object was only two hundred feet long, and also putting aside those exaggerated opinions which said it was a mile wide and three miles long'one could nevertheless conclude that this phenomenal creature was considerably larger than anything at that time recognized by ichthyologists'if it existed at all.

But it didexist--there was no denying this fact any longer--and considering the natural inclination of the human brain toward objects of wonder, one can understand the excitement produced throughout the world by this supernatural apparition. In any case, the idea of putting it into the realm of fiction had to be abandoned.

On July 20, 1866, the steamer Governor Higginson of the Calcutta and Burnach Steam Navigation Company had encountered this moving mass five miles east of the Australian coast. Captain Baker first thought he had sighted an unknown reef; he was even getting ready to plot its exact position when two columns of water spurted out of the inexplicable object and rose with a loud whistling noise to a height of a hundred and fifty feet. So, unless the reef contained a geyser, the Governor Higginson was quite simply in the presence of an unknown aquatic mammal, spurting columns of water mixed with air and vapor out of its blowholes.

A similar thing was observed on July 23 of the same year in Pacific waters, by the Christopher Columbus of the West India and Pacific Steam Navigation Company. This extraordinary creature could therefore move from one place to another with surprising speed, since within a space of only three days, the Governor Higginson and the Christopher Columbus had sighted it at two points on the globe separated by more than 2100 nautical miles.

Two weeks later and six thousand miles from this last spot, the Helvetia of the Compagnie Nationale and the Shannon of the Royal Mail Steamship Company, passing on opposite courses in that part of the Atlantic lying between the United States and Europe, signaled one another that they had sighted the monster at 42° 15' N. Lat. and 60° 35' W. Long. In this simultaneous observation they felt able to judge the creature's minimum length at more than 350 feet, since it was larger than both ships each of which measured 330 feet over-all. But the largest whales, the Kulammak and Umgullick that live in the waters around the Aleutian Islands, never exceed 180 feet in length, if that much.

These reports arriving one after the other, with fresh observations made on board the liner Le Pereire, a collision between the Etna of the Inman Line and the monster, an official report drawn up by the officers of the French frigate Normandie, and a very reliable sighting made by Commodore Fitz-James' staff on board the Lord Clyde, greatly stirred public opinion. In lighthearted countries, people made jokes about it, but in serious practical-minded countries, such as England, America and Germany, it was a matter of grave concern.

In every big city the monster became the fashion: it was sung in cafés, derided in newspapers and discussed on the stage. Scandal sheets had a marvelous opportunity to print all kinds of wild stories. Even ordinary newspapers--always short of copy--printed articles about every huge, imaginary monster one could think of, from the white whale, the terrible “Moby Dick” of the far north, to the legendary Norse kraken whose tentacles could entwine a five-hundred-ton ship and drag it to the bottom. Reports of ancient times were mentioned, the opinions of Aristotle and Pliny who admitted to the existence of such monsters, along with those of the Norwegian bishop, Pontoppidan, Paul Heggede and finally Mr. Harrington, whose good faith no one can question when he claims to have seen, while on board the Castillan in 1857, that enormous serpent which until then had been seen in no waters but those of the old Paris newspaper, the Constitutionnel.

It was then that in scientific societies and journals an interminable argument broke out between those who believed in the monster and those who did not. The “question of the monster” had everyone aroused. Newspapermen, who always pretend to be on the side of scientists and against those who live by their imagination, spilled gallons of ink during this memorable campaign; and some even spilled two or three drops of blood, after arguments that had started over sea serpents and ended in the most violent personal insults.

For six months this war was waged with varying fortune. Serious, weighty articles were published by the Brazilian Geographical Institute, the Royal Scientific Academy of Berlin, the British Association and the Smithsonian Institute in Washington; others appeared in the Indian Archipelago, in Abbé Moigno's Cosmos, in Petermann's Mittheilungen and in the science sections of all the important newspapers of France and other countries.

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. Copyright © by Jules Verne. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 47 )
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(28)

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2 Star

(4)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 47 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2008

    'If Injins are of no use, Injins would not have been created'

    Thematically, James Fenimore Cooper's 1840 novel THE PATHFINDER is a many-splendored thing. It is cross- cultural: Amerindians interact with French and British, both soldiers straight from Europe and home-grown colonials. The book is also historical: about the French and Indian Wars that determined which Europe-based nations would temporarily rule the North American continent. The yarn is also about sailing, especially the differences between sailing on oceans and sailing on that 'inland sea' which is Lake Ontario. *** Nathaniel 'Natty' Bumppo, hero of the five-volume LEATHERSTOCKING TALES, is in his later 30s. His assigned vocation, his 'gift' in his own jargon, is to be a loner, a kind of diaphragm that reacts when white Colonial lungs breathe hotly, deeply and destructively across his beloved wildernesses. *** Like Aeneas with Dido of Carthage, our hero is briefly turned aside from his Providence-assigned vocation by love of a good woman. The only woman the Pathfinder ever hopelessly, conventionally and strongly falls in love with is beautiful young Mabel Dunham, daughter of the sergeant major of the 55th British regiment. That group of soldiers was orginally recruited in Scotland, though it is now fleshed out by colonials. The imports complain about New World food, e.g. incomparable Lake Oswego bass and pine for their oatmeal cakes, as does even their commander, the Highland Laird Major Alexander Duncan of Lundie. Lundie is an historically real character. As the novel says he did, he lived in a fur-lined portable house on wheels within Fort Ontario. *** There is something primeval about Natty. He is a sort of Adam living in paradise before the Fall 'Ch. IX'. God did not mind Adam falling in love with Eve. But He had other plans for Natty Bumppo than to become a conventional husband and father. Natty found his own thoughts unprecedentedly too full of Mabel, too willing to neglect his scouting to be around her. She would reluctantly have married him only because her dying father wanted her to. But once Natty grasped that Mabel really loved the daring young lake captain Jasper Western, the Pathfinder accepted his fate. Like all creatures he had his gifts, restless celibacy being one of several. *** Something of what THE PATHFINDER is about comes out in Natty's remark to Jasper: 'I have come to the opinion, boy, that, as Providence rules all things, no gift is bestowed without some wise and reasonable end. If Injins are of no use, Injins would not have been created. ... even the Mingo tribes were produced for some rational and proper purpose, though I confess it surpasses my means to say what it is' 'p.77 Ch. VI'. *** This is a slow moving, reflective tale. It is not for children or even impatient university students if they are not English majors. But for mature adults who have known love and its loss, read on! -OOO-

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2014

    Fox 嫘 2

    (Where is carcass.)

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2014

    Hint hint

    Deathberries....... whispers a ghostly voice. (>:0

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2014

    Silverfang

    Lept on carcasses neck and dug his teeth in

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2014

    To BloodClan

    Find hemlock. Kills in less than two minutes. ~&Delta

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2014

    Bloodmoon Rage quiting

    Im done. Im just so fu<_>ckimg done. If i keep going on like this im gonna break my brand new nook just like my last one. It couldnt even be fixed. Im rage quiting for today. When i rage i break what ever im holding or anything. So im done taday. Im sick and tired bof the godmodimg duc<_>hbag called carcase and im sooooo fu<_>cking done with steal blue. Literatly. If i ever see here again i swear to god i will destroy her. Goodbye for today.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2014

    To firesteel

    Ummm. Shes inside him and u cant get in. She has to make her way out.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2014

    Virus

    Virus lept from the shadows, and gripped Carcass's foreleg, not letting go for any reason, his teeth meeting bone as he curled himself tight around Carcass's leg.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2014

    Firesteel

    Firesteel escaped quickly.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2014

    Hey guys

    After your done fighting, there is a surprise for you back at home. No cheating now!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2014

    Shadowrise

    Gtgtb bbt. YAY ITS FRIDAY TOMMORROW!)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2014

    Carcass

    *his mutilated corpse stunk and lay there in the clearing*

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2014

    Seek & Destroy

    *pad off*

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2014

    Silverfang

    Yowled," back to camp or die!" And raced back to camp

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2014

    Deimos to Fox and Steel Blue

    Fox: note for you at your camp<p>
    Steel Blue: I'm back. My sister keps taking my s<_>hit today. My phone, my ds, my nook...head back over when you're done fighting. I'm not gonna help right now 'cause i don' t even know why you guys are fighting and I have other things that are keeping me busy.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2014

    Fox 嫘

    Flew in to the air towards "midsummer night".

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2014

    Grimm to Shadowrise

    "Go!" He eruted into motion and slammed Sadowrise into a tree, his claws had already stealthily crept into his tomach, hooking on

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2014

    Steel Blue

    She olled away from his paws, but not before getting a mouthfull f them. She used his ws as an advantage, snapping her jaws shut like a steel trap. She flung over to roll, sending him flyong, paws snapping

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2014

    Raptor

    Hoped his mom was OK.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2013

    Jaysoar

    NNNNNNOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!! NOT MISTYSTAR TOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! WWWWWHHHYYYYYYYYYYY???????????!!!!!!!!!!! -Jaysoar

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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