The Pathology Of Power

The Pathology Of Power

by Norman Cousins
     
 

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“A disturbing look at the military state using evidence from committees of the Congress, whistle-blowers, and concerned citizens. . . .A thoughtful and chilling look at Fortress America, its architects and its victims.” —Kirkus Reviews
In this book, a seasoned commentator on world affairs discusses the way power in government becomes enlarged,

Overview

“A disturbing look at the military state using evidence from committees of the Congress, whistle-blowers, and concerned citizens. . . .A thoughtful and chilling look at Fortress America, its architects and its victims.” —Kirkus Reviews
In this book, a seasoned commentator on world affairs discusses the way power in government becomes enlarged, exploited, and institutionalized—not just as the result of external dangers, real or contrived, but as the result of the way the arms race spills over into and dominates foreign policy. The clandestine operation that led to the Iran-Contra affair, Norman Cousins observes, is a recent example of dangerous trend with its own momentum. Mr. Cousins returns here to the central theme that dominated the editorial pages of the Saturday Review during the thirty years of his editorship: the challenge to human freedom and safety represented by vast destructive power slipping away from the means of control.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Cousins (The Healing Heart, etc.) returns to familiar concerns in this account of the ``collective madness'' of the arms race. Stressing that national security is often a guise that allows private contractors to earn huge profits in weapons-making, he examines the U.S. development of nuclear weapons since World War II, noting that even major military figures (MacArthur, Eisenhower) have sought alternatives to their use. Much of the book focuses on the widely reported dishonesty, mistakes and mismanagement of weapons-makers who profit from ``excessive and careless military spending.'' The U.S., Cousins warns, is now dangerously dependent on defense spending. He concludes by urging the strengthening of world institutions and the establishment of new forums to meet world problems. While offering little that is original, Cousins's lucid overview will doubtless appeal to his large following. (February 23)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393305418
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
08/01/1988
Pages:
232
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.53(d)
Lexile:
1330L (what's this?)

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Meet the Author

Norman Cousins was a longtime editor of the Saturday Review and the author of eleven books on health and healing, among other works.

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