Patient by Patient: Lessons in Love, Loss, Hope, and Healing from a Doctor's Practice

Overview

Emily Transue earned her credentials in medical school, but learns lessons of a different kind when she embarks on private practice. Her patients, some delightful, some difficult, all come to her for medical advice but, they are not the only ones gaining from the experience. As Dr. Transue guides them through routine exams and life-challenging crises she learns much about life and death, hope and fear and being the physician she wants to be. These lessons carry over into her personal life as she struggles with ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (32) from $1.99   
  • New (4) from $1.99   
  • Used (28) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$1.99
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(865)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
*~*~ Brand New, Mint Condition. Never Previously Owned.*~*~ Ships Immediately *~*~ Hassle-Free Refunds If you Aren't Fully Satisfied ~*~*

Ships from: Deer Park, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(865)

Condition: New
EXPEDITED SHIPPING AVAILABLE

Ships from: Deer Park, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$11.98
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(294)

Condition: New
0312372787 New item in stock, may show minimal wear from storage. I ship daily. 100% Money Back Guarantee!

Ships from: FORT MYERS, FL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$29.51
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(345)

Condition: New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Patient by Patient: Lessons in Love, Loss, Hope, and Healing from a Doctor's Practice

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook - First Edition)
$7.99
BN.com price

Overview

Emily Transue earned her credentials in medical school, but learns lessons of a different kind when she embarks on private practice. Her patients, some delightful, some difficult, all come to her for medical advice but, they are not the only ones gaining from the experience. As Dr. Transue guides them through routine exams and life-challenging crises she learns much about life and death, hope and fear and being the physician she wants to be. These lessons carry over into her personal life as she struggles with heartwrenching illness and loss in her own family. Throughout, she is a keen observer of her patients, their families, and their lives.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
Another memorable collection of medical stories and essays from young physician Transue (On Call: A Doctor's Days and Nights in Residency, 2004). The author, who also teaches creative writing at the University of Washington School of Medicine, begins her second memoir on her first day in private practice as a primary-care physician in Seattle. She shows herself learning valuable life lessons from her patients, but she broadens her scope to include family, and the lessons include ones about love and loss, grief and healing. As Transue was launching her practice, her father, who had dementia, was slowly dying, and her beloved elderly grandparents struggled with poor health. "I was learning the role a primary care physician plays in people's lives," she writes. "Being a daughter and granddaughter was equally important, as I followed the people I loved in the journey toward the end of life. The two roles enriched and informed each other." Though often poignant and even somber-she lost both her father and her grandmother during this period, and some of her patients suffered from terminal illnesses-her stories are suffused with warmth, revealing the special relationship that can develop between an empathetic doctor and a trusting patient. There's humor, too, as Transue touches on the mishaps and misunderstandings that are part of running a private practice, as well as the funny things that patients think and say and do. In a section entitled "Words," she mulls over some of the euphemisms and odd word usages of her profession and the apt neologisms of patients. When one patient blended "drugs" and "groggy" to tell her that a medication made him "too droggy to drive," she added the term to herown vocabulary. With her second perceptive memoir, Transue claims a solid place in the growing ranks of doctors who write well. Agent: Joan Raines/Raines & Raines
From the Publisher
Advance praise for Patient by Patient:

“Quiet, funny, and sad, the daily life of this fully alive physician becomes a model for the life of the fully alive self. Doctors and patients seeking renewal, inspiration, laughter, and wisdom will find them all in this deftly written book. It is filled with hope and with courage and with joy.” -Rita Charon, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Director of the Program in Narrative Medicine, Columbia University

“An intimate portrait of the doctor-patient relationship. Emily Transue offers insightful and engaging reflections on the interplay of health and illness.” -Danielle Ofri, MD, PhD, author of Incidental Findings, Editor-in-Chief, Bellevue Literary Review

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312372781
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 4/1/2008
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 8.30 (w) x 5.52 (h) x 0.96 (d)

Meet the Author

Emily R. Transue, MD, author of On Call, is a native of Toledo, Ohio, and a graduate of Yale College and Dartmouth Medical School.  She did her residency and chief residency in Internal Medicine at the University of Washington, Seattle.  She works as a general internist at a multispecialty group in Seattle, and is a clinical Assistant Professor at the University of Washington.  She received the Providence-Seattle Medical Center Outstanding Educator of the Year award in 2003, and is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians.  She has also published stories and poems in JAMA, Dartmouth Medicine, and elsewhere.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Patient by Patient

Lessons in Love, Loss, Hope, and Healing from a Doctor's Practice


By Transue, Emily R. St. Martin's Press

Copyright © 2008 Transue, Emily R.
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780312372781


Chapter 1
As I pressed my new parking sticker carefully onto my windshield, I paused to consider the enormity of what the small sliver of plastic represented. At the age of twenty-nine, with twenty-four continuous years of education under my belt, I was about to begin what could be called my first real job. My new business card burned in my pocket: “Emily R. Transue, MD, General Internal Medicine.” I was starting practice as a primary care physician.
With a laugh, I thought back to the day I’d decided to go to medical school. It was early in my senior year in college; I’d been a biology major, scrambling for a new career path after realizing I didn’t want to spend my life at a lab bench. I’d done Parkinson’s research with primates, and reasoned that if monkeys were interesting, people must be even more so. I called my grandparents to announce my momentous decision.
“But we hate doctors,” my grandmother protested.
Through all my years of medical training, whenever a physician amputated the wrong leg, administered the wrong medication, or made some other terrible mistake, my grandmother would send me a news clipping. I was never sure if these were warnings about what might occur if I applied myselfinadequately, or simply further evidence for the argument that physicians were an untrustworthy lot. During my second year of medical school, she called to tell me that my grandfather had developed atrial fibrillation, an irregular heart rhythm. It’s usually treated with blood thinners, to reduce the risk of a clot forming in the heart and traveling to the brain, and cardioversion, a brief electrical shock to restore the heart rhythm. “They’re giving your grandfather rat poison,” my grandmother declared. Rat poison is made from warfarin, the same compound used medicinally to thin blood. “Then they’re going to electrocute him.”
I had to admit that these were precisely the kinds of barbaric things that people in my chosen profession did.   
Still, here I was. Absurdly, the parking sticker brought home what my contract, my application for hospital privileges, the ordering of office letterhead and exam room supplies, and all the other events of the past weeks had not. In the eight years since I had started medical school, everything I had done had been temporary. Student clerkships lasted four to eight weeks, residency rotations a month. My year as a chief resident, teaching and helping run the program I had finished the year before, was the longest I had spent in any single role, and even that was clearly defined as transient; my successor was chosen before I’d even started. In all that time I had hung temporary parking placards from my rearview mirror. The sticky teal rectangle on my front window seemed to symbolize the end to transience and the unfamiliar permanence I was entering. After eight years of working toward this role, I had arrived.
A few weeks before, the ink barely dry on my employment contract, I had signed another sheaf of papers, buying a house with my sweetheart, also a doctor starting his first job. Our possessions were still in boxes, the wonder of owning a piece of land and the home that sat on it still fresh. As I finished affixing the parking sticker and walked into the angular brick and glass building of the clinic, I was bursting with the richness and strangeness of my new life. I had a house, a job, a piano, two cats, a life partner. I was a long way from Ohio, where I grew up, and from New Hampshire, where I went to medical school. I was far from my family. My brother was doing computer work in Boston; my mother had left her college professor position in Ohio to go to law school in Washington, D.C. Most acutely, I felt my distance from the ones who weren’t well: my father, who recently had moved into a nursing home in California, and his parents—the ones who hated doctors—who were close to ninety but still living independently in Pennsylvania in the house where my grandfather grew up.
Nonetheless, I had laid down my roots here, in Seattle. I could feel them in the earth under the maple tree in my new front yard, and even in the glue of the parking sticker. I was about to walk into the clinic and begin to grow roots of another kind, putting on my white coat and meeting strangers who would become my patients, as I grew into my role as their doctor.
I felt the joint tug of responsibility to the people I loved and to the patients I would begin caring for today. I had finished the hard years of residency, the hundred-hour weeks and thirty-six-hour shifts, the drama of the hospital and the emergency room. I had seen a lot of people die or nearly die in those years, and I thought I knew plenty about grief and loss and healing. I little imagined how much more and how differently I would learn in the coming years. Much of this would come from the patients I would care for, not just in the episodic crises of the hospital but in the slower, richer arc of sickness and health that a primary care doctor sees. In parallel, my first years in practice would be tumultuous ones for the people in the world I loved most, and I would see more than I ever had of medicine from the other side.
I could only begin to glimpse all this, as the sliding doors opened to admit me to the cool, quiet air of the clinic. My heart sped with a mix of anxiety and excitement as I stepped inside, savoring the newness, and looking forward to a time when I could savor familiarity instead. 
Copyright © 2008 by Emily R. Transue. All rights reserved.


Continues...

Excerpted from Patient by Patient by Transue, Emily R. Copyright © 2008 by Transue, Emily R.. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)