×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Patient from Hell: How I Worked with My Doctors to Get the Best of Modern Medicine and How You Can Too
     

The Patient from Hell: How I Worked with My Doctors to Get the Best of Modern Medicine and How You Can Too

by Stephen H. Schneider
 

See All Formats & Editions


In the bewildering days after diagnosis of a severe disease, patients learn two daunting facts: One, no doctor has all the answers, and two, there are no answers, only odds. For readers (and their families) who want to be involved in the key choices regarding treatment, Dr. Schneider is the ideal guide. A climate scientist, his life's work is decision making

Overview


In the bewildering days after diagnosis of a severe disease, patients learn two daunting facts: One, no doctor has all the answers, and two, there are no answers, only odds. For readers (and their families) who want to be involved in the key choices regarding treatment, Dr. Schneider is the ideal guide. A climate scientist, his life's work is decision making in the face of great uncertainty. This important book is both his own gripping story of working with his doctors to get the best treatment possible, and also a brilliant critique of the flawed system under which doctors must now operate. "Receiving a diagnosis of cancer can bring out the best or the worst in patients.... For Stephen H. Schneider, Ph.D. it brought out the fighter.... The story is compelling.... It offers a number of positive and useful messages for patients enduring chemotherapy, radiation, and other cancer treatments." (Journal of the American Medical Association) "Compelling...a frightening medical adventure." (Donald Kennedy, Ph.D., Editor-in-Chief of Science)

Editorial Reviews

MacLean's
"An emotional account of the pain and fear [Schneider] felt while he was ill."
Journal of the American Medical Association
"Compelling...offers a number of positive and useful messages for patients enduring chemotherapy, radiation, and other cancer treatment."
Publishers Weekly
Schneider, a climate scientist at Stanford and a MacArthur fellow, brought skills rooted in the uncertainty of his own field to bear on the treatments he received for mantle cell lymphoma, a rare condition for which treatments were relatively new. With his wife, Terry, also a scientist, he learned as much as possible about the protocol he had been assigned and read up on his oncologist, a leader in this type of cancer, Dr. Sandra Horning. Schneider gives a detailed account of the painful and otherwise unpleasant side effects of the chemotherapy, radiation and bone-marrow transplant he endured in a determined effort to arrest the disease. From the beginning, the author researched probabilities and outcomes and sought to modify decisions made by his physicians. Most importantly, after some resistance, Dr. Horning agreed to use Rituxan for Schneider as maintenance therapy to prolong his remission. Although the author's scientific language can be daunting, patients will relate to his arguments for the importance of patient advocates, individualization of treatments and the negative role bottom-line accounting plays in medical judgments made by HMOs. (Oct.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780738210254
Publisher:
Da Capo Press
Publication date:
09/26/2005
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
6.25(w) x 9.25(h) x 1.25(d)

Meet the Author


Stephen H. Schneider, Ph.D., is Professor of Biological Science at Stanford University, a MacArthur Prize Fellowship winner, and author of major works on climate change and the environment. He has written for and his works have been covered by the New York Times, the Washington Post, and London Times.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews