Patricia Von Pleasantsquirrel

Patricia Von Pleasantsquirrel

by James Proimos
     
 

First things fi rst, Patricia von Pleasantsquirrel is not a squirrel. She's a girl - a princess, in fact, only she hasn't found her princessdom. But that's about to change. Inspired by a book she reads, Patricia sets off for a place where she can stay up till midnight, eat cake before dinner, and have not just a dog but a great white stallion. She fi nds it. And a

See more details below

  • Checkmark Kids' Club Eligible  Shop Now

Overview

First things fi rst, Patricia von Pleasantsquirrel is not a squirrel. She's a girl - a princess, in fact, only she hasn't found her princessdom. But that's about to change. Inspired by a book she reads, Patricia sets off for a place where she can stay up till midnight, eat cake before dinner, and have not just a dog but a great white stallion. She fi nds it. And a whole lot more than she bargained for.

James Proimos pays cheeky homage to a classic picture book favorite in this disarming, laugh-out-loud funny tale of a prideful little girl, her royal goldfi sh, her airplane, and her cadre of hippos. Two levels of comedy and plenty of visual gags make this a great read for kids and parents alike.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Despite her name, Patricia von Pleasantsquirrel is a girl, a princess who is searching for her princessdom. Her family has no sympathy for her ideas, forbidding her from staying up late, or having cake before dinner. One night, after reading about the boy who became a king in Where the Wild Things Are, she packs up her things, gets in her airplane, and flies away. In the Land of the Hippos, the top hippo accepts her as princess. She gets a crown, a party, cake galore, even her own stallion. But when she tries to fulfill all her duties, she finds that she can't, and must leave. By the time she flies home, she is ready to accept her life there. Her book of choice then is The Giving Tree. But when she reads it to her fish, after a long discussion, "�they decided they had no idea what it was really about." This very comic tale of a young girl's fantasy is visualized in cartoon fashion with no settings, just the characters, some few words of text, and occasional spoken comments with no speech balloons. There are big hippos in this small book, mostly gray but one purple. Otherwise the sketchy black outlines are filled with yellow and purple, as are her two favorite jelly beans, Edith Wharton and Louisa May Alcott. Obviously there is fun here for adults as well. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal

K-Gr 2

Patricia von Pleasantsquirrel is underappreciated by her family members, who fail to recognize her innate princessness. Taking a page from Maurice Sendak's Where the Wild Things Are , she escapes her prosaic life, flying to a place where hippos reign supreme. They crown Patricia as their princess and give her many of the things she has dreamed of-and quite a few she hadn't. When she tires of the game, she returns home, content to be herself. According to the jacket copy, Proimos's story plays "cheeky homage" to Sendak and Max, but the bold-lined, cartoon-style illustrations and Patricia's postmodern sassiness also owe a debt to James Marshall, calling to mind his bossy Goldilocks . This funny story joins the ranks of Jon Agee's The Retired Kid (Hyperion, 2008) and Kate Feiffer's President Pennybaker (S & S, 2008).-Lisa Egly Lehmuller, St. Patrick's Catholic School, Charlotte, NC

Kirkus Reviews
Inspired by a certain children's classic about a "silly boy with no social graces" who becomes king of the Wild Things, snotty young Patricia decides to leave home in search of the princessdom she is sure that she deserves. Alighting at last in the Land of the Hippos, she's offered the royal job by the rotund residents-only to discover that it's not all wild rumpuses and cake for every meal. In fact, there are at least 230 princessly duties that come with the job, from cooking dinner for the hippos to getting them up with a rooster's crow at five every morning. Ultimately Patricia rebels, is fired and finds herself much more appreciative of her old life when she gets back. After a later reading of The Giving Tree proves no more satisfying (she can't figure out what it's really about), she heads happily to bed. Illustrated with simple cartoons in yellow, purple and gray, this tongue-in-cheek mini-epic will have parents and younger fans of Proimos' offbeat Johnny Mutton tales snickering. (Picture book. 6-8)

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780803730663
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
03/05/2009
Pages:
56
Product dimensions:
8.38(w) x 8.26(h) x 0.53(d)
Age Range:
6 - 8 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >