Patriot's History of the Modern World, Vol. II: From the Cold War to the Age of Entitlement, 1945-2012

Overview

The bestselling historians turn their focus to America’s role in the world since the end of World War II
 
Schweikart, author of the number one New York Times bestseller A Patriot’s History of the United States, and Dougherty take a critical look at America, from the postwar boom to her search for identity in the twenty-first century.
 
The second volume of A ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$26.79
BN.com price
(Save 29%)$38.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (23) from $8.39   
  • New (18) from $8.25   
  • Used (5) from $13.72   
Patriot's History® of the Modern World, Vol. II: From the Cold War to the Age of Entitlement, 1945-2012

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$19.99
BN.com price

Overview

The bestselling historians turn their focus to America’s role in the world since the end of World War II
 
Schweikart, author of the number one New York Times bestseller A Patriot’s History of the United States, and Dougherty take a critical look at America, from the postwar boom to her search for identity in the twenty-first century.
 
The second volume of A Patriot’s History of the Modern World picks up in 1945 with a world irrevocably altered by World War II and a powerful, victorious United States. But new foes and challenges soon arose: the growing sphere of Communist influence, hostile dictatorships and unreliable socialist allies, the emergence of China as an economic contender, and the threat of world Islamification.
 
The book reestablishes the argument of American exceptionalism and the interplay of our democratic pillars—Judeo-Christian religious beliefs, free market capitalism, land ownership, and common law—around the world.
 
Schweikart and Dougherty offer a fascinating conservative history of the last six decades.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
10/07/2013
Rock-ribbed Americanism confronts communism abroad and liberalism at home in this conservatives’ chronicle of post-war history. Schweikart and Dougherty (A Patriot’s History of the Modern World, Vol. I) continue their account of how an “American exceptionalism” based on Christianity, private property, common law, and free markets shaped the world. Their narrative is equal parts glory and gloom, as America leads the capitalist democracies to victory over the communist bloc in the Cold War only to be undermined by a degenerate welfare-state socialism pushed by domestic progressives advocating “the soft slavery of entitlements and the silver shackles of government support.” The authors’ sweeping panorama takes in war, geopolitics, economics, culture, and sexual mores, all filtered through a staunchly conservative viewpoint spiced with polemical digressions on global warming alarmism, diet fads, and other topics. Their critique of left-liberal historiography is spirited—a discussion of Soviet spies in the United States is particularly revealing—but their platform is clear, as when they repeat claims about John Kerry’s Vietnam service and Barack Obama’s birthplace. The result is a history dear to the right-wing audience. (Dec.)
Kirkus Reviews
2013-10-29
Schweikart (History/Univ. of Dayton) and Dougherty follow up the first volume of their Patriot's History of the Modern World (2012) with a disappointing sequel, again stressing above all the unchallenged nature of American exceptionalism. The authors differentiate themselves from more traditional historians, who locate the American exception in the written Constitution, citizens' self-government and the separation of powers. Instead, they adopt a pre-Constitutional frame focusing on "the four pillars of American exceptionalism." These include "common law, a Christian (mostly Protestant) religious culture, access to private property...and free market capitalism," and Schweikart and Dougherty boldly assert that without all four pillars, "no true American style republic could be developed." Many historians would find the authors' thesis unsupportable, and this volume is disappointing mainly since it fails to elaborate how the "four pillars" have played out across the history of the world since 1945. The authors fail to pursue the opportunities to link historical developments to their primary thesis. Chief among these missed opportunities regards Martin Luther King's leadership of the civil rights movement. Schweikart and Dougherty present King as "an Atlanta-born Republican pastor who had a divinity degree from Boston University," but they do not examine how a movement of mainly Protestant Christians, drawing from the nonviolent principles of Mahatma Gandhi, might affect the Protestant cultural requirement of their frame. Equally, they miss the references to King's movement that were so common among Lutheran-influenced protesters in East German nonviolent demonstrations in the late 1980s, and they ignore the impact of U.S. constitutional thinking in post–World War II settlements in Germany and Japan. The authors provide an avalanche of facts, but the causes that could link to their underlying "four pillars" thesis are neither offered nor proven. They conclude with a story from the Bible and compare it to the state of America in 2013, "which wants a government to ‘fight our battles' and take care of everyone, needy or not." Right-slanted, monotonous historical reading offering little new, valid insight.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781595231048
  • Publisher: Sentinel HC
  • Publication date: 12/5/2013
  • Pages: 704
  • Sales rank: 194,765
  • Product dimensions: 6.60 (w) x 9.40 (h) x 2.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Larry Schweikart

Larry Schweikart is a professor of history at the University of Dayton and the coauthor of A Patriot’s History of the United States and A Patriot’s History Reader, among many other books.
 
Dave Dougherty is the coauthor of A Patriot’s History Reader among other books.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)