Patterns for Computer-Mediated Interaction [NOOK Book]

Overview

New technologies have changed the way people interact with each other at a distance. Instead of working and socialising face-to-face, many people today collaborate remotely via the Internet. As a result, there are more and more groupware-applications and community environments. Examples include multi-player games, community sites in the new emerging Web 2.0, applications for interaction between mobile users, and highly interactive group editors. In these areas, there is a shift in focus from human computer ...
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Patterns for Computer-Mediated Interaction

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Overview

New technologies have changed the way people interact with each other at a distance. Instead of working and socialising face-to-face, many people today collaborate remotely via the Internet. As a result, there are more and more groupware-applications and community environments. Examples include multi-player games, community sites in the new emerging Web 2.0, applications for interaction between mobile users, and highly interactive group editors. In these areas, there is a shift in focus from human computer interaction to computer-mediated human interaction.

Experts Till Schummer and Stephan Lukosch show you how to build applications to support computer-mediated interaction. To build these groupware systems, the authors use a pattern language. the role of the patterns are twofold; they focus on the human user of the system and they provide developers with the design knowledge and rationale to make expert decisions.

Depending on your role in the development process, this book will help you in different ways:

  • As a software developer the patterns will show you the different functional components that need to be developed when dealing with common groupware-related problems.
  • As a user the patterns will provide you with an idea of what the groupware applications look like and how the social processes change when groupware comes into play.
  • As a student or researcher the pattern language documents best practices and provides links to literature in which these practices are discussed

To complement the patterns, the authors provide a running scenario based on a distributed software development team and two case studies about successful groupware applications, to show you the feasibility of the pattern approach for groupware development.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781118725719
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 6/26/2013
  • Series: Wiley Software Patterns Series
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 600
  • File size: 19 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Till Schummer: His PhD thesis focused on Design Patterns for group formation and maintenance. Since March 2002 Member of the scientific staff at the Distributed Systems Division at the Fern Universitat in Hagen. Interests cover: distributed systems, operating systems, CSCW (computer supported collaborative work), and distributed software development.

Stephan Lukosch: During his graduation he developed a platform called DreamObjects. DreamObjects simplifies the development and management of shared data objects that are necessary to enable collaboration among distributed users. DreamObjects is an extension of DreamTeam, which is a platform for the development of synchronous, collaborative applications. Since August 2003, Assistant Professor for ‘Distributed systems for cooperative working/learning environments’ at the University of Hagen.

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction.

1.1 Groupware: Systems that support computer-mediated interaction.

1.2 A day with Paul Smith.

1.3 Outline.

1.4 Acknowledgements.

2. From Patterns to a Pattern-oriented Development Process.

2.1 Patterns and Pattern Languages.

2.1.1 Towards an Holistic Understanding of Socio-technical Forces.

2.1.2 Representations of Patterns.

2.1.3 A Pattern Style for Computer-Mediated Interaction.

2.1.4 How patterns should be applied.

2.1.5 Relationships among patterns in a pattern language.

2.2 An Overview of our Pattern Language for Computer-Mediated Interaction.

2.2.1 The three layers of the pattern language.

2.2.2 Topic clusters on the different layers.

2.2.3 Related Pattern Languages.

2.3 The 2.3.1 Conceptual Iteration.

2.3.2 Development Iteration.

2.3.3 Tailoring Iteration.

2.3.4 Applicability of OSDP.

3. Community Support.

3.1 Welcome me: : : or how to arrive in the community.

3.1.1 Quick Registration **.

3.1.2 Login **.

3.1.3 Welcome Area *.

3.1.4 Mentor.

3.1.5 Virtual Me **.

3.1.6 User Gallery *.

3.1.7 Buddy List **.

3.1.8 Welcome me: : : applied.

3.2 Guide me: : : or how to deal with quality.

3.2.1 Quality Inspection *.

3.2.2 Letter of Recommendation *.

3.2.3 Birds of a Feather.

3.2.4 Expert Finder.

3.2.5 Hall of Fame *.

3.2.6 Reward.

3.2.7 Guide me: : : applied.

3.3 Save me: : : or how to protect users.

3.3.1 Reciprocity *.

3.3.2 Masquerade *.

3.3.3 Availability Status **.

3.3.4 Attention Screen *.

3.3.5 Quick Goodbye *.

3.3.6 Save me: : : applied.

4. Group Support.

4.1 Touch me: : : or on how to modify shared material together.

4.1.1 Group *.

4.1.2 Shared File Repository **.

4.1.3 Shared Browsing *.

4.1.4 Vote *.

4.1.5 Application Sharing **.

4.1.6 Shared Editing **.

4.1.7 Floor Control **.

4.1.8 Touch me: : : applied.

4.2 Meet me: : : or how to create places for collaboration.

4.2.1 Room **.

4.2.2 Active Map *.

4.2.3 Interaction Directory **.

4.2.4 Bell **.

4.2.5 Invitation **.

4.2.6 Blind Date.

4.2.7 Meet me: : : applied.

4.3 Read.Me: : : or how to support textual communication.

4.3.1 Embedded Chat **.

4.3.2 Forum **.

4.3.3 Threaded Discussions *.

4.3.5 Shared Annotation.

4.3.6 Feedback Loop *.

4.3.7 Digital Emotions **.

4.3.8 FAQ.

4.3.9 Read.Me: : : applied.

4.4 Feel me: : : or the provide synchronous group awareness.

4.4.1 User List **.

4.4.2 Spontaneous Collaboration *.

4.4.3 Active Neighbors.

4.4.4 Interactive User Info *.

4.4.5 Remote Field of Vision *.

4.4.6 Remote Selection *.

4.4.7 Remote Cursor **.

4.4.8 Telepointer *.

4.4.9 Activity Indicator *.

4.4.10 Feel me: : : applied.

4.5 Remember me: : : or how to maintain asynchronous group awareness.

4.5.1 Activity Log **.

4.5.2 Timeline.

4.5.3 Periodic Report **.

4.5.4 Change Indicator **.

4.5.5 Aliveness Indicator.

4.5.6 Away Message *.

4.5.7 Remember me: : : applied.

5. Base Technology.

5.1 Connect me: : : or how to handle sessions.

5.1.1 Collaborative Session **.

5.1.2 Persistent Session *.

5.1.3 State Transfer **.

5.1.4 Replay.

5.1.5 Connect me: : : applied.

5.2 Share me: : : or how systems manage common data.

5.2.1 Centralized Objects **.

5.2.2 Remote Subscription **.

5.2.3 Replicated Objects **.

5.2.4 Nomadic Objects.

5.2.5 Mediated Updates **.

5.2.6 Decentralized Updates *.

5.2.7 Distributed Command *.

5.2.8 Share me: : : applied.

5.3 Control me: : : or how systems ensure data consistency.

5.3.1 Pessimistic Locking *.

5.3.2 Optimistic Concurrency Control **.

5.3.3 Conflict Detection **.

5.3.4 Operational Transformation *.

5.3.5 Lovely Bags.

5.3.6 Immutable Versions *.

5.3.7 Control me: : : applied.

6. Examples of Applying the Pattern Language.

6.1 The Case of BSCW.

6.1.1 Community Support.

6.1.2 Group Support.

6.1.3 Base Technology.

6.2 The Case of CoWord.

6.2.1 Group Support.

6.2.2 Base Technology.

Chapter 7. Epilogue.

Bibliography.

Index.

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