Patterns in Network Architecture: A Return to Fundamentals / Edition 1

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Overview

Groundbreaking Patterns for Building Simpler, More Powerful Networks

In Patterns in Network Architecture, pioneer John Day takes a unique approach to solving the problem of network architecture. Piercing the fog of history, he bridges the gap between our experience from the original ARPANET and today’s Internet to a new perspective on networking. Along the way, he shows how socioeconomic forces derailed progress and led to the current crisis.

Beginning with the seven fundamental, and still unanswered, questions identified during the ARPANET’s development, Patterns in Network Architecture returns to bedrock and traces our experience both good and bad. Along the way, he uncovers overlooked patterns in protocols that simplify design and implementation and resolves the classic conflict between connection and connectionless while retaining the best of both. He finds deep new insights into the core challenges of naming and addressing, along with results from upper-layer architecture. All of this in Day’s deft hands comes together in a tour de force of elegance and simplicity with the annoying turn of events that the answer has been staring us in the face: Operating systems tell us even more about networking than we thought. The result is, in essence, the first "unified theory of networking," and leads to a simpler, more powerful–and above all–more scalable network infrastructure. The book then lays the groundwork for how to exploit the result in the design, development, and management as we move beyond the limitations of the Internet.

Using this new model, Day shows how many complex mechanisms in the Internet today (multihoming, mobility, and multicast) are, with this collapse in complexity, now simply a consequence of the structure. The problems of router table growth of such concern today disappear. The inescapable conclusion is that the Internet is an unfinished demo, more in the tradition of DOS than Unix, that has been living on Moore’s Law and 30 years of band-aids. It is long past time to get networking back on track.

  • Patterns in network protocols that synthesize “contradictory” approaches and simplify design and implementation
  • "Deriving" that networking is interprocess communication (IPC) yielding
  • A distributed IPC model that repeats with different scope and range of operation
  • Making network addresses topological makes routing purely a local matter
  • That in fact, private addresses are the norm–not the exception–with the consequence that the global public addresses required today are unnecessary
  • That mobility is dynamic multihoming and unicast is a subset of multicast, but multicast devolves into unicast and facilitates mobility
  • That the Internet today is more like DOS, but what we need should be more like Unix
  • For networking researchers, architects, designers, engineers

    Provocative, elegant, and profound, Patterns in Network Architecture transforms the way you envision, architect, and implement networks.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780132252423
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 1/10/2008
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 464
  • Product dimensions: 7.20 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

John Day has been involved in research and development of computer networks since 1970 (his original network address was 12). Mr. Day has developed and designed protocols for everything from the data link layer to the application layer.

Mr. Day has made fundamental contributions to research on distributed databases developing one of two fundamental algorithms in the updating of multiple copies. He also did work on the early development of supercomputers and was a member of a team in developing 3 operating systems. Mr. Day was an early advocate of the use of Formal Description Techniques for protocols and shepherded the development the three international standard FDTs: Estelle, Lotos, and SDL. Mr. Day was in charge of the development of the OSI Reference Model, Naming and Addressing and a major contributor to the upper layer architecture and was a member of the Internet Research Task Force's Name Space Research Group. He has been a major contributor to the development of Network Management Architecture, working in the area since 1984 defining the fundamental architecture currently prevalent and designing high performance implementations, and fielded a network management system in the mid-80's that was 10 years ahead of comparable systems. Recently Mr. Day has been turned his attention the fundamentals of network architectures and their implications found in this book.

Mr. Day is also a recognized scholar in the History of Cartography having published on topics relating to Neolithic Korea and to the Jesuits in 17thC China. Most recently, Mr. Day has contributed to an exhibit, Encompassing the Globe, at the Smithsonian Institution, summer 2007 and a chapter inMatteo Ricci Cartographia (in Italian).
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Table of Contents

Preface: The Seven Unanswered Questions xiii

Chapter 1: Foundations for Network Architecture 1

Chapter 2: Protocol Elements 23

Chapter 3: Patterns in Protocols 57

Chapter 4: Stalking the Upper-Layer Architecture 97

Chapter 5: Naming and Addressing 141

Chapter 6: Divining Layers 185

Chapter 7: The Network IPC Model 235

Chapter 8: Making Addresses Topological 283

Chapter 9: Multihoming, Multicast, and Mobility 317

Chapter 10: Backing Out of a Blind Alley 351

Appendix A: Outline for Gedanken Experiment on Separating Mechanism and Policy 385

Bibliography 389

Index 399

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2008

    Well done history of a complex topic

    When it comes to the kind of people involved in computer networks, there are four different types the architects, engineers, IT professionals, and the end users. The architects design, the engineers build and maintain, the IT professionals configure for the unique business purpose, and the users work on it. This book is written by an architect for architects 'and engineers aspiring to be architects'. I'm doing this review with the perspective of someone who works mostly as an IT professional but spends about 35% as an engineer. With many endeavors, it is easy to focus on the short-term with little or no emphasis on the long-term. John Day, as seen through this book, has both the unique experiences of designing and addressing very specific technical topics but also standing back and looking at how networks have evolved in perspective historically and where they need to go. This kind of work is indeed extremely important as our world becomes more interconnected every day, knocking down communication barriers and making more critical information available to people everywhere. We need to closely examine where and why the Internet has ended up where it is today so we can make the best long-term decisions for the future and that is exactly what John Day does in Patterns in Network Architecture. This is very technical book that brings detailed processes together through both history and theoretical patterns. I can see this book being used in educational environments concerned with network architecture design '103 level classes' and organizations that place a high amount of significance on practical theory. I'm giving this book a five because of the amount of detail it covers and the flow he keeps throughout the book. Most writers covering this type of information get lost in the logistics but I felt like I was engaged at a lecture 'instead of studying after a lecture'.

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