Patterns in Peru: An Adventure in Patterning

Patterns in Peru: An Adventure in Patterning

by Cindy Neuschwander, Bryan Langdo
     
 

Matt and Bibi unravel a pattern to discover a lost city

The Zills are visiting Peru to study the mysterious lost city of Quwi when Matt and Bibi stumble into an adventure.

With only each other, their faithful dog Riley, and an unusual ancient relic to guide them, the twins must use their understanding of patterns and sequences to locate the lost

Overview

Matt and Bibi unravel a pattern to discover a lost city

The Zills are visiting Peru to study the mysterious lost city of Quwi when Matt and Bibi stumble into an adventure.

With only each other, their faithful dog Riley, and an unusual ancient relic to guide them, the twins must use their understanding of patterns and sequences to locate the lost city—and the way back.

This companion to Mummy Math is a pattern-packed adventure in math that's perfect for young readers.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz
Matt, his sister Bibi, and their dog Riley are in Peru with their parents, who are there to help Professor Herrera search for the lost Incan city of Quwi. An ancient tunic, which Matt has put on as they travel, may have clues to its location. As the kids become separated from the adults, they notice that there seem to be warnings in the patterns on the tunic of the hazards they encounter. The tunic seems to indicate how to open a stone door and how to get through a wall to finally reach the lost city. The story is really just a frame for introducing the types of patterns used to develop pre-algebra skills. The single and double-page non-detailed watercolor illustrations depict just enough to keep the story moving, focusing on the patterns of the Incan tunic, while tossing in bits of rather fantastic adventures. The ending, when the ancient city is discovered, is a bit abrupt. The final page details suggestions for activities to extend the skills of recognizing, describing, and extending patterns introduced in the text.
School Library Journal

Gr 1�4
Twins Matt and Bibi follow up Mummy Math (Holt, 2005) with a new archaeology/math adventure. This time they accompany their scientist parents to Peru. By interpreting patterns woven into an Inca shawl, the youngsters follow clues to the Lost City of Quwi, whose location has eluded explorers for centuries. While the story defies logic and teaches little about local culture, it might serve as an introduction to classroom activities on sequence and pattern perception. Langdo's cartoonlike illustrations adequately depict patterns to decipher but do little to enliven the narrative. In fact, Matt, Bibi, and their canine companion seem oddly static even in dangerous situations. A list of suggested activities follows the story's conclusion. Jennifer Rozines Roy and Gregory Roy's Patterns in Nature (Benchmark, 2005) reinforces math concepts in a more straightforward presentation.
—Kathy PiehlCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
This latest mathematical adventure explores patterning. Matt and Bibi are in Peru so their scientist parents can help decode the patterns on a 500-year-old tunic. All the adventure-loving twins need to hear is that the tunic belonged to the messenger of a never-discovered hidden city, and they are off and running. Riding on guanacos high in the mountains, the only thing Matt can find to keep him warm is the aforementioned tunic. Rather fortuitous, as the patterns on the tunic help them survive pitfalls along the way, while the last two patterns are the key to unlocking the city's doors. Langdo's vibrantly colored watercolors support the text, but are not enough to help readers decipher the last pattern. Focusing on repeating, positional and growing patterns, this would benefit from more examples since the story overwhelms the math. A final note provides ideas for activities to practice patterning. Similar flaws mar all the books in this series, this being no exception: lack of adult supervision, disregard for artifacts and the twins' reliance on pure luck to save the day. All in all a disappointment, although it does fill a gap in the shelf for this concept. (Picture book. 6-9)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780805079548
Publisher:
Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
Publication date:
04/28/2007
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.32(w) x 10.36(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
7 - 11 Years

Meet the Author

Cindy Neuschwander is a third-grade teacher and the author of the Sir Cumference series. She lives with her family in northern California.

Bryan Langdo is the illustrator of several books for young readers. He lives in New Jersey with his wife, Nikki.

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