Patterns of Development in Latin America: Poverty, Repression, and Economic Strategy / Edition 1

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Overview

"This is an excellent book, unequalled in the existing scholarly literature. It fits an unoccupied niche in the social science literature: a discussion focused on economic topics on their own merits which is continentally comprehensive, historically informed, up to date in intellectual sophistication and contemporaneity, and exceptionally wellwritten."—Jorge I. Dominguez, Harvard University

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"An ambitious attempt to analyze continuities and changes in contemporary Latin America. The book focuses on three questions: what accounts for persistently strong inequalities of Latin America; what are the main effects on Latin America of its relations with the rest of the world; and what relationship has there been in Latin America between the trends toward market-oriented economic systems and extreme political repression. Using both topical and country-oriented approaches, Sheahan ranges widely and sensitively over recent Latin American experiences with market capitalism, Marxist socialism, and various middle-road alternatives. He draws balanced, reformist conclusions—aimed both at Latin American leaders and those who shape U.S. policy. A wise and perceptive book."—Foreign Affairs

"Any social scientist writing a general book on a comparative theme in Latin America immediately confronts a series of problems—the passions aroused by the theoretical debates (in this case structuralism, monetarism, and dependency); the need to synthesize these theoretical insights with conflicting empirical research; the vast quantity of literature which has appeared since the 1960s; and the choice of which countries to concentrate on and examples to use. John Sheahan's excellent book shows how a skillful and judicious writer can cut through the theoretical and empirical research to produce an effective study of the recent economic history of Latin America."—International Affairs

Foreign Affairs
An ambitious attempt to analyze continuities and changes in contemporary Latin America. The book focuses on three questions: what accounts for persistently strong inequalities of Latin America; what are the main effects on Latin America of its relations with the rest of the world; and what relationship has there been in Latin America between the trends toward market-oriented economic systems and extreme political repression. Using both topical and country-oriented approaches, Sheahan ranges widely and sensitively over recent Latin American experiences with market capitalism, Marxist socialism, and various middle-road alternatives. He draws balanced, reformist conclusions—aimed both at Latin American leaders and those who shape U.S. policy. A wise and perceptive book.
International Affairs
Any social scientist writing a general book on a comparative theme in Latin America immediately confronts a series of problems—the passions aroused by the theoretical debates (in this case structuralism, monetarism, and dependency); the need to synthesize these theoretical insights with conflicting empirical research; the vast quantity of literature which has appeared since the 1960s; and the choice of which countries to concentrate on and examples to use. John Sheahan's excellent book shows how a skillful and judicious writer can cut through the theoretical and empirical research to produce an effective study of the recent economic history of Latin America.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691022642
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 11/1/1987
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 410
  • Product dimensions: 6.17 (w) x 9.26 (h) x 1.01 (d)

Table of Contents

Tables and Figures vii
Preface ix
Part I Persistent Issues
1. Ways of Looking 3
2. Poverty 23
3. Employment and Earnings 49
4. External Trade, Industrialization, and Economic Growth 74
5. Inflation, External Deficits, and IMF Stabilization Programs 99
6. Ownership I: Land 130
7. Ownership II: Multinationals, Public Enterprise, and Dependency 155
Part II National Patterns of Response
8. Early Industrialization and Violent Reaction: Argentina and Brazil 179
9. Reformism, Marxism, and Militant Monetarism: Chile 204
10. Two Kinds of Revolutionary Alternative: Cuba, and Peru under Velasco 237
11. Middle-Road Market Economies: Colombia, Costa Rica, and Mexico 271
Part III Possibilities and Questions
12. Economic Strategies, Social Strains, and Political Repression 313
13. Is It Possible for the United States to Play a Constructive Role? 328
14. From Conclusions to Ongoing Questions 355
References 363
Index 395
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