Paul Auster's City of Glass: A Graphic Mystery

Paul Auster's City of Glass: A Graphic Mystery

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by Paul Auster
     
 

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A graphic novel classic with a new introduction by Art Spiegelman

Quinn writes mysteries. The Washington Post has described him as a "post-existentialist private eye." An unknown voice on the telephone is now begging for his help, drawing him into a world and a mystery far stranger than any he ever created in print.

Adapted by Paul Karasik and

Overview

A graphic novel classic with a new introduction by Art Spiegelman

Quinn writes mysteries. The Washington Post has described him as a "post-existentialist private eye." An unknown voice on the telephone is now begging for his help, drawing him into a world and a mystery far stranger than any he ever created in print.

Adapted by Paul Karasik and David Mazzucchelli, with graphics by David Mazzucchelli, Paul Auster's groundbreaking, Edgar Award-nominated masterwork has been astonishingly transformed into a new visual language.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312423605
Publisher:
Picador
Publication date:
08/01/2004
Series:
Neon Literature Series
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
144
Sales rank:
1,112,700
Product dimensions:
5.49(w) x 8.20(h) x 0.31(d)
Age Range:
17 - 18 Years

Meet the Author

Paul Auster is the author of eleven novels, most recently Oracle Night. His previous two novels, The Book of Illusions and Timbuktu, were national bestsellers. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Brooklyn, New York
Date of Birth:
February 3, 1947
Place of Birth:
Newark, New Jersey
Education:
B.A., M.A., Columbia University, 1970

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Paul Auster's City of Glass: A Graphic Mystery 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
On the surface, this is a mystery story. A writer named Quinn is mistaken for a detective named Paul Auster. 'Coincidentally, or not, the author's name.' Quinn is hired by a man named Peter Stillman for protection from Stillman's father- a man who imprisoned his infant son in a small room and never spoke to him, in the belief that a child who never heard human speech would learn to speak 'God's language.' But it is so much more than that- it's a reflection on the nature of language and the meaning of words, an exploration of the way the essence of items cannot be captured by their names. For hardcore mystery fans, the ending may be too confusing and metaphysical- but for fans of philosophy and beautiful language, this is a must-read.