Paul Revere (In Their Own Words) by George E. Sullivan, George Sullivan |, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Paul Revere (In Their Own Words)

Paul Revere (In Their Own Words)

by George E. Sullivan, George Sullivan
     
 

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On April 16, 1776, Paul Revere made his famous midnight ride from Boston to Lexington, Massachusetts. He rode to tell people in the countryside that the British troops would soon arrive. Although Paul was stopped by British soldiers, his actions on that night have made him an American legend.

Yet Paul accomplished much more than that. In Their Own Words: Paul

Overview

On April 16, 1776, Paul Revere made his famous midnight ride from Boston to Lexington, Massachusetts. He rode to tell people in the countryside that the British troops would soon arrive. Although Paul was stopped by British soldiers, his actions on that night have made him an American legend.

Yet Paul accomplished much more than that. In Their Own Words: Paul Revere tells the exciting story of Paul Revere's life using his own writing and art. Hear Paul's story as if you were really there.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Acclaim for Helen Keller and Abraham Lincoln:

In Their Own Words biographies focus on famous people who left a record of their own lives. Beginning with an explanation of the difference between primary and secondary sources, Sullivan seamlessly interweaves information about his subject with excerpts from primary sources. In the case of Helen Keller, Sullivan uses her autobiographical works; for Lincoln, he draws on speeches and letters. Both Keller and Lincoln have been covered in numerous biographies for young people (Sullivan's own Picturing Lincoln was published last fall), but these volumes are worthwhile. The short chapters, large print, simple vocabulary, straightforward narrative, and attractive illustrations, as well as the addition of the subjects' own words, make them fine choices for early-grade biographies. They fit nicely between David Adler's Picture Book Biography series books and more challenging volumes such as Russell Freedman's classic Lincoln: A Photobiography (1987).
--Booklist

... These may not be unique biographies, but they are still well written, fast moving, and highly readable, squeezed into a small format that should appeal to many students. Both books feature black-and-white photos and reproductions, a useful index, a short bibliography of primary and secondary sources, and a short list of further readings, along with places to contact for further information. Certainly much has been written about how these two figures and many libraries will find their shelves already well stocked. Those needing more materials, however, will find these to be solid choices.
--School Library Journal

School Library Journal
Gr 4-6-These titles have "reluctant reader" written all over them. They are decently packaged with well-chosen and credited photographs, but the large-print, generously spaced text is written in short, choppy sentences, losing the narrative flow and the drama of history well told. In Lewis and Clark, the expedition is said to be traveling "mostly north" toward the Gates of the Mountains, after their portage of the Great Falls on the Missouri River, an egregious geographical error. Even more bizarre is the use of the term "Chopponish" for the much more commonly known Nez Perce. Expedition journals used the uncommon appellation, but there is no footnote explaining the connection. Unfortunately, in telling about the expedition's various encounters with Native Americans, Sullivan emphasizes the potentially threatening, unfriendly, and fearsome aspects. Paul Revere also contains factual errors but suffers even more from oversimplification. There is no discussion of the American colonial system as context for the independence movement and revolution; events such as the First Continental Congress are mentioned with no explanation. For a title on Lewis and Clark that is truly "in their own words" see Peter and Connie Roop's Off the Map: The Journals of Lewis and Clark (Walker, 1993), and for an excellent, accessible history, Rhoda Blumberg's The Incredible Journey of Lewis and Clark (Morrow, 1995) is hard to beat. Jean Fritz's And Then What Happened, Paul Revere? (Coward-McCann, 1973) remains a favorite account of the silversmith's daring role in revolutionary America. Given the sloppy effort, these titles are marginal.-Nancy Collins-Warner, Neill Public Library, Pullman, WA Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780439095525
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
09/01/2000
Series:
In Their Own Words
Pages:
128
Sales rank:
407,562
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 7.40(h) x 0.30(d)
Lexile:
740L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author


Author George Edward Sullivan was born on August 11, 1927, in Lowell, MA. Between 1945 and 1948, he was in the U.S. Navy, where he served as a journalist. He has written over 200 nonfiction books for children and young adults on a wide variety of topics. In 2005, his book BUILT TO LAST was honored with the Orbis Pictus Award for Outstanding Nonfiction for Children. Sullivan is a member of PEN, Authors Guild, Authors League of America, and the American Society of Journalists and Authors. He lives in New York with his wife.

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