Pauperism: Its Causes and Remedies

Pauperism: Its Causes and Remedies

by Henry Fawcett
     
 

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Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally… See more details below

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Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781290887397
Publisher:
HardPress Publishing
Publication date:
08/01/2012
Pages:
290
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.61(d)

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER III. ON THE INCREASE OF POPULATION. In the previous chapters repeated allusion has been made to the evils which result from causes which produce an undue increase of population. The subject is one which peculiarly requires plain speaking; it is surrounded with an almost impenetrable mass of prejudice. With confidence, however, it can be asserted, that if in a country like England the possible increase of population is not adequately restrained by prudential habits, the general condition of the nation will become more and more unsatisfactory; and pauperism will assume more formidable proportions. Unless the generally recognised principles of economic science are a tissue of fallacies, it can be easily shown that no scheme of social improvement can be of permanent efficacy if it is unaccompanied by an increased development of providence amongst the general mass of the people. The truth of this is proved in a very striking manner by considering the effects whichhave resulted from free trade. If anyone refers to the speeches which were made during the anti-Corn-Law agitation by the prominent advocates of the movement, he will find that the most glowing anticipations were indulged in with regard to the consequences which would result from the abolition of protection. Mr W. J. Fox, who was perhaps at one time the most distinguished orator of the party, when addressing a large meeting in Covent Garden Theatre asserted that the abolition of protection would exterminate pauperism; and he predicted that in a few years the ruins of the workhouses would mark the extinction of protection just in the same way as the ruins of the baronial castles mark the destruction of feudalism. Nearlya quarter of a century has now elapsed since the adoption of free trade in corn, and the pre...

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