Pawn [NOOK Book]

Overview




YOU CAN BE A VII IF YOU GIVE EVERYTHING.

For Kitty Doe, it seems like an easy choice. She can either spend her life as a III in misery, looked down upon by the higher ranks and forced to leave the people she loves, or she can become a VII and join the most powerful family in the country.

If she says yes, Kitty will be Masked—surgically ...
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Pawn

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Overview




YOU CAN BE A VII IF YOU GIVE EVERYTHING.

For Kitty Doe, it seems like an easy choice. She can either spend her life as a III in misery, looked down upon by the higher ranks and forced to leave the people she loves, or she can become a VII and join the most powerful family in the country.

If she says yes, Kitty will be Masked—surgically transformed into Lila Hart, the Prime Minister's niece, who died under mysterious circumstances. As a member of the Hart family, she will be famous. She will be adored. And for the first time, she will matter.

There's only one catch. She must also stop the rebellion that Lila secretly fostered, the same one that got her killed…and one Kitty believes in. Faced with threats, conspiracies and a life that's not her own, she must decide which path to choose—and learn how to become more than a pawn in a twisted game she's only beginning to understand.


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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
10/14/2013
Carter (the Goddess Test series) tries her hand at near-future dystopia, with mixed results. The economy has collapsed, and resources have run out—that’s as much world-building as Carter does, so it’s hard to see how or why the United States has willingly and rapidly transformed from prosperous democracy to micromanaged dictatorship. Kitty, raised in a state-mandated group home, is in love with her boyfriend, Benjy, but her test results show she’s a low achiever, and the 17-year-old is assigned a sewer-maintenance job in faraway Denver. While they wait for Benjy to be tested, Kitty runs away to become a prostitute, only to have her virginity bought by the most powerful man in the country, Prime Minister Daxton Hart. It’s not sex he’s after, though: he wants Kitty to impersonate his dead niece. Why, and at what price, Kitty can only guess. The romance is anemic, with Benjy barely mentioned for chapters at a time. Though well-paced and readable, as Carter’s prose normally is, the absence of credible setting or emotion makes this an underwhelming read. Ages 14–up. Agent: Rosemary Stimola, Stimola Literary Studio. (Nov.)
From the Publisher
"Well-paced and readable." -Publishers Weekly

"An engaging heroine to root for...and a page-turner full of twists and turns. Readers will look forward to the next book in the anticipated trilogy."
-Booklist

"Carter convincingly shows readers an America in the not-so-distant future in this dystopian series-starter, after which they will be...so ready for more....Carter is excellent at setting the scene...but what really invests the readers are the perfectly flawed characters." – Romantic Times Book Review

VOYA - Laura Perenic
Pawn is an intriguing political thriller that readers will want to finish in one night. Kitty Doe is an orphan in a caste-based society. At age seventeen, everyone must take a test to determine their caste but Kitty cannot read nor can she afford a tutor. Tattooed with the Roman numeral III, Kitty's bleak future as a sewer worker is only slightly more appalling than her friend's offer to work as a prostitute. Readers will find nothing untoward beyond references to the sex trade; no sexual encounters occur. Auctioned for more money than she could make in a year, Kitty nervously meets her purchaser, only to discover his plans are focused on power play among the elite caste, VII. Offered a position as the double for political dignitary Lila Hart, Kitty must successfully impersonate someone whom she has never met. If she satisfies the matriarch, Augusta, Kitty will live luxuriously as a VII, or at least until another family member decides she is better off dead. Lacking in sex, drugs, and curse words, The Blackcoat Rebellion series will be popular with a younger audience looking for new dystopias. Filled with scheming, subterfuge, and the threat of being shipped off to Elsewhere, Carter has crafted a suspenseful mystery that will necessitate the purchase the sequel, Captive (release date unknown). Small quibbles with illogic in the plot will be completely missed by young adult readers as they barrel through to learn more Hart family drama. Reviewer: Laura Perenic
School Library Journal
02/01/2014
Gr 10 Up—Kitty isn't destined for greatness. She lives in a dystopian America a few generations into the future. She's grown up in a group home, due to her status as a second child in a society where fertility is controlled. A reading disability prevents her from acheiving a desirable score on the national placement test that determines caste. She has no money, no opportunity, and no chance at a secure future with her boyfriend, Benjy. Kitty is out of options and attempts a career as a prostitute. When the powerful and cruel Prime Minister, Daxston Hart, offers to transform Kitty into an exact replica of his deceased niece, Kitty has new opportunities, and dangers, that she never imagined. While Carter doesn't break any new ground in teen dystopian literature with Pawn, she executes the elements of the genre expertly-the tempo is brisk, the tension is deeply felt, the protagonist is a great reader's proxy, and the villains are smooth and terrifying. Kitty is a brash, imperfect hero, and readers will root for her every step of the way as she makes tough decisions to protect her loved ones and stay true to her pre-Lila identity and values. The secondary characters are thinly drawn, but the actions and plot twists will keep readers satisfied and waiting for more in the series. Recommended for teens who enjoy political intrigue and action thrillers, as well as other popular dystopian novels.—Susannah Goldstein, Convent of the Sacred Heart, New York City
Kirkus Reviews
2013-09-15
This new dystopian series opener wants to be a romance novel but skews toward suspense. Seventeen-year-old Kitty and her true love, Benjy, live in Washington, D.C., more than 70 years in the future. America has become a totalitarian dictatorship under the devious Hart family. Upon turning 17, everyone must take a test that will determine their rank and role for the rest of their lives. Although extremely intelligent, dyslexic Kitty can't read, so she emerges from the test as a III and is assigned to clean out sewers in Denver. She tries to escape by becoming a prostitute, but Prime Minister Daxton Hart buys her at auction and Masks her into an identical copy of his popular niece, Lila, whom he recently murdered. Thereafter, the story revolves around Kitty's struggles to impersonate Lila, find Benjy and deal with the constant conspiracies involving the Harts. Carter doesn't make much use of her new world, focusing almost entirely on palace intrigues instead of the society she's created. Boyfriend Benjy comes across less as a character than as a prop: He's useful to the Harts and to the plot only as a constant threat to keep Kitty in line. Meanwhile, Kitty tries to learn who's a rebel and who isn't and which side she should take to save herself. Another forgettable genre entry. (Dystopian romance. 12 & up)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781460322567
  • Publisher: Harlequin
  • Publication date: 11/26/2013
  • Series: Blackcoat Rebellion Series , #1
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Original
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 69,398
  • Age range: 14 - 17 Years
  • File size: 327 KB

Meet the Author


Aimée Carter was born in 1986 and raised in Michigan, where she currently resides. She started writing fan fiction at eleven, began her first original story four years later, and hasn’t stopped writing since. Besides writing and reading, she enjoys seeing movies, playing with her puppies, and wrestling with the puzzles in the paper each morning.


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Read an Excerpt

Risking my life to steal an orange was a stupid thing to do, but today of all days, I didn't care about the consequences. If I were lucky, the Shields would throw me to the ground and put a bullet in my brain.

Dead at seventeen. It would be a relief.

As I hurried through the crowded market, I touched the back of my neck and tried not to wince. That morning, my skin had been pale and smooth, with only a freckle below my hairline. Now that noon had come and the test was over, my skin was marred with black ink that would never wash off and ridges that would never disappear.

III. At least it wasn't a II, though that wasn't much of a consolation.

"Kitty," called Benjy, my boyfriend. He tucked his long red hair behind his ears as he sauntered toward me, taller and more muscular than most of the others in the marketplace. Several women glanced at him as he passed, and I frowned.

I couldn't tell whether Benjy was oblivious or simply immune to my bad mood, but either way, he gave me a quick kiss and a mischievous look. "I have a birthday present for you."

"You do?" I said. Guilt washed over me. He didn't see the orange in my hand or understand I was committing a crime. He should have been safe at school instead of here with me, but he'd insisted, and I had to do this. I'd had one chance to prove I could be worthwhile to society, and I'd failed. Now I was condemned to spend the rest of my life as something less than everyone in that market, all because of the tattoo on the back of my neck. Stealing a piece of fruit meant only for IVs and above wouldn't make my life any easier, but I needed one last moment of control, even if the Shields arrested me. Even if they really did kill me after all.

Benjy opened his hand and revealed a tiny purple blossom, no bigger than my thumbnail, nestled in his palm. "It's a violet," he said. "They're a perennial flower."

"I don't know what that means." I glanced around, searching for where he might have found it. Three tables down, next to a booth selling pictures of the Hart family, was one boasting colorful bottles of perfume. Tiny purple flowers covered the table. They were only decorations, not goods. Not anything that could get him killed or arrested and sent Elsewhere, like my orange. The seller must have let him take one.

"Perennial means that once they're planted, they keep growing year after year." He placed the flower in my palm and brushed his lips against mine. "They never give up, like someone I know."

I kissed him back, forcing myself to relax. "Thank you. It's beautiful." I sniffed the violet, but if it had a scent, it was lost in the smells surrounding us.

Despite the cool autumn day, it was sweltering inside the market. People were packed together, creating a stench that mingled with the sizzling meats, fresh fruit, and hundreds of other things the vendors tried to sell. I usually didn't mind, but today it made my stomach turn.

"We need to go," I said, cupping my fingers around the flower to keep it safe. The orange in my other hand seemed to grow heavier with every passing second, and it wouldn't be long before someone noticed us. Benjy stood out in a crowd.

He glanced at the orange, but he said nothing as he followed me toward the exit, setting his hand on my back to guide me. I tensed at his touch, waiting for him to brush my hair away and spot my tattoo. He hadn't asked yet, but that courtesy wouldn't last forever.

I'd seen the posters and heard the speeches. Everyone had. We all had our rightful place in society, and it was up to us to decide what that was. Study hard, earn good grades, learn everything we could, and prove we were special. And when we turned seventeen and took the test, we would be rewarded with a good job, a nice place to live, and the satisfaction that we contributed to our society—everything we would ever need to lead a meaningful life.

That was all I'd ever wanted: to prove myself, to prove that I was better than the Extra I really was. To prove I deserved to exist even though I was a second child. To prove the government hadn't made a mistake not sending me Elsewhere.

Now my chance was over, and I hadn't even earned an average IV. Instead of living the meaningful life I'd been promised since before I could remember, I'd managed a III. There was nothing special about me—I was just another Extra who should never have been born in the first place.

I was a waste.

Worst of all, as much as I wanted to hate them for my III, it wasn't the government's fault. Everyone had an equal shot, and I'd blown mine. Now I had to live with the shame of having a permanent record of my failure tattooed onto the back of my neck for everyone to see, and I wasn't so sure I could do it.

Benjy and I had nearly reached the exit when a weedy man dressed in a gray Shield uniform stepped in front of me, his arm outstretched as he silently demanded my loot. The pistol holstered to his side left me no choice.

"I found it on the ground," I lied as I forked over the orange. "I was about to give it back to the merchant."

"Of course you were," said the Shield. He rotated his finger, a clear sign he wanted me to turn around. Benjy dropped his hand, and panic spread through me, white-hot and urging me to run.

But if I took off, he might blame Benjy, and all I could hope for now was that my stupid decision didn't affect him, too. Benjy had a month to go before he turned seventeen, and until then, he wouldn't be held responsible for his actions. Until that morning, I hadn't been, either.

At last I turned and pulled my dirty blond hair away from the nape of my neck. Even if I wanted to, I couldn't hide the mark or the angry red blotch surrounding it, still painful from the needle that had etched my rank into my skin.

Benjy stiffened at the sight of my III. I stared straight ahead, my face burning with shame. I'd let him down. I'd let both of us down. And now everything was going to change.

The man brushed his fingertips against the mark, feeling the three ridges underneath that proved it wasn't altered. Satisfied, he dropped his hand. "Is she telling the truth?" he said, and Benjy nodded, not missing a beat.

"Yes, sir. We were on our way to the stall now." Benjy twisted around to give him a glimpse of his bare neck. "We're only here to look around."

The Shield grunted, and he tossed the orange in the air and caught it. I scowled. Was he going to let me go or force me to my knees and shoot me? Less than five feet away, browned blood from another thief still stained the ground. I looked away. Maybe he'd send me Elsewhere instead, but I doubted it. The bastard looked trigger-happy.

"I see." He leaned in, and I wrinkled my nose at his sour breath. "Did you know your eyes are the same shade as Lila Hart's?"

I clenched my jaw. Lila Hart, the niece of the prime minister, was so wildly popular that hardly a week went by when someone didn't mention that the bizarre blue shade of my eyes matched hers.

"No," I said through gritted teeth. "Never heard that before in my life."

The Shield straightened. "What's your name?"

"Kitty Doe."

"Doe?" He eyed us both. "You're Extras?"

"Yes," I said, trying to keep the snarl out of my voice. No one with an ounce of self-preservation talked to a Shield like that, but after what had happened that morning, I didn't have it in me to kiss anyone's ass.

Out of the corner of my eye, I noticed Benjy frown, and I could almost hear his silent question. What do you think you're doing?

Stupidly risking my life, that's what.

The Shield stroked his pistol. "Stay put. Move, and I'll kill you, got it?"

I nodded mutely. But as soon as he turned away, Benjy touched my elbow, and our eyes met. Without hesitating, we bolted.

Benjy and I pushed past the crowds, through the gates, and into the damp street. We sprinted between the aging buildings and ducked down alleyways, and as we passed a faded mural of Prime Minister Hart smiling down on us benevolently, I resisted the urge to spit on it.

We ran through a maze of side streets until we reached the border of the Heights, the easternmost suburb of the District of Columbia. And the poorest. I searched for any signs of the IIs that populated the area, anyone who might be willing to snitch on us for a fresh loaf of bread, but during the day, while everyone was working at the docks or in the factories, the street was deserted.

After the workday ended, adults and children spilled into the overcrowded streets, begging for food. I usually had to elbow my way down the sidewalks and weave between men and women who couldn't be more than twenty years older than me, but already their hair had grayed and their skin turned to leather—the results of decades of hard labor and struggling to make ends meet. My life wouldn't be much better. As a IV, I could have counted on reaching sixty. Now, as a III, I would be lucky to hit forty. If I wasn't careful, I would also be out on the streets begging for more than the government had decided I was worth.

As we dashed around a corner, I spotted a sewer entrance a few feet away and sighed with relief. We were safe.

I shimmied through the opening on the edge of the sidewalk, and a minute later, Benjy climbed down from a manhole nearby. The sewer was dark and smelled like rust and rot, but it was the only place our conversation would be private. Even the empty streets didn't offer that guarantee. Shields were everywhere, waiting for their chance to pounce the moment they heard a word against the Harts or the Ministers of the Union. According to Nina, the matron of our group home, they got bonuses for each arrest they made, and they had families to feed, too. Didn't mean I hated them any less, though.

That morning, before I'd left, she'd said we all had our roles to play. It just so happened that some were better than others. We couldn't all be VIs and VIIs, and all any of us could hope for was food in our bellies and a place to call our own. I would have a roof over my head; the government made sure of that. But now, with my III, I would be outrageously lucky if it didn't leak.

In the speeches we watched from first grade on, Prime Minister Daxton Hart promised us that as privileged American citizens, we would be taken care of all our lives, so long as we gave back to the society that needed us. If we worked hard and gave it our all, we would get what we deserved. We were masters of our own fate.

Up until today, I'd believed him.

"What were you doing back there?" said Benjy. "You could've been killed."

"That was kind of the point," I muttered. "Better than being a III for the rest of my life."

Benjy sighed and reached for me, but I sidestepped him. I couldn't take his disappointment, too.

He slouched. "I don't understand—sixty-eight percent of all people tested are IVs."

"Yeah, well, guess I'm dumber than sixty-eight percent of the population." I kicked a puddle of rancid rainwater, splashing a few rats that squeaked in protest.

"Eighty-four percent, actually, including the Vs and above," said Benjy, and he added quickly, "but you're not. I mean, you're smart. You know you are. You outwitted that Shield back there."

"That wasn't smart. That was reckless. I told him my real name."

"You had no choice. If he'd found out you were lying, he would have killed you for sure," said Benjy. He stopped and faced me, cupping my chin in his hand. "I don't care what the test said. You're one of the smartest people I know, all right?"

"Not the kind of smart that matters." Not like Benjy was. He read everything he could get his hands on, and he forced me to watch the news with him every night. By the time we were nine, he'd read the entire group home library twice. I could recite whole articles seconds after he read them to me, but I couldn't read them to myself.

"Nina was wrong," I added. "You don't get extra time if they read the questions to you. The parts I reached were easy, but the reader was slow, and I didn't finish. And they docked points because I can't read."

Benjy opened and shut his mouth. "You should have told me before we left the testing center," he said, and I shook my head.

"There's nothing you could have done." A lump formed in my throat, and I swallowed hard. All of the studying, the preparation, the hope—it was all for nothing. "I'm a III. I'm a stupid, worthless—"

"You are not worthless." Benjy stepped closer, so close I could feel the heat radiating from his body. He wrapped his arms around me, and I buried my face in his chest, refusing to cry. "You're strong. You're brilliant. You're perfect exactly the way you are, and no matter what, you'll always have me, okay?"

"You'd be better off without me and you know it," I muttered into his sweater.

He pulled away enough to look at me, his blue eyes searching mine. After a long moment, he leaned down and kissed me again, this time lingering. "I'm never better off without you," he said. "We're in this together. I love you, and that's never going to change, all right? I'm yours no matter what your rank is. You could be a I, and I would go Elsewhere just to find you."

I tried to laugh, but it came out as more of a choking sob. The rank of I was only given to the people who couldn't work or contribute to society, and once they were sent Elsewhere, no one ever saw them again. "If I were a I, we probably never would've met in the first place."

"Doesn't matter," he murmured, running his fingers through my hair. "I would know something was missing. I would know my life was pointless, even if I never understood why. Even if we'd never met, even if you never existed, I would still love you beyond all reason for the rest of my life."

I kissed him, pouring every ounce of my frustration and anger into it. The sewer wasn't exactly romantic, but with Benjy there, I didn't care. He understood. He always understood, and in that moment, I needed him more than I could ever explain. The government might not have thought I was worth anything, but I was worth something to Benjy, and that should've been all that mattered.

At last I pulled away and cleared my throat. The lump was gone. "You won't have any problem with it," I promised. "You'll finish early and still get a VI."

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 22 )
Rating Distribution

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(10)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 23, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Powerful New YA Series!

    Would you give up your life and your identity to save those you care about? In a dystopian America where a power-hungry dynasty dictates what your station in life will be, seventeen year old Kitty, one of society’s “throw away” children, is thrown into a twisted plot to cover up the death of the “first” daughter. Bought on the black market, drugged and unconscious, Kitty wakes up to find the girl she has seen in the mirror for her entire life is gone, replaced by the face, body and voice of another and blackmailed into pretending to be Lila, the popular daughter of Daxton Harte, America’s leader. Kitty soon learns there is more to the death of Lila than meets the eye, and that Harte is actually a puppet for the family matriarch. She will do anything to keep those she loves safe, but soon finds that there is a grassroots rebellion in the making and just maybe members of this completely dysfunctional family may be its greatest supporters and allies. Can Kitty perform well enough to fool those around her? Can she fool the public? With so many lives on the line, she cannot fail, but as the Harte family’s house of smoke and mirrors starts to crumble from within, the secrets that are revealed threaten to overwhelm the resourceful young girl from the streets.

    Pawn by Aimee Carter will rock you back on your heels with its fresh and intriguing plot that contains elements of surprise, mystery, political intrigue, terror and even romance! This is brilliant story-telling, fast-paced, unrelenting in its magnetic pull and a tremendously strong base to build what promises to be an incredible series! When Ms. Carter allowed Kitty to tell this story from her own perspective, it was a stroke of creative genius, putting the reader right in the middle of the action.

    Each character is unveiled slowly, their forms colored in and their personalities crammed with three-dimensional life! All along the way, there are twists, turns and knots to be unraveled, but never did the pace relent! I absolutely NEED to know what will happen next!

    I received an ARC edition from Harlequin Teen in exchange for my honest review.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 10, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Pawn was such a disappointment. There I said it. I was really..

    Pawn was such a disappointment. There I said it. I was really.. and I mean really looking forward to it because the synopsis promised a comeback for the dystopians with an actual dystopian plot line. Unfortunately the lack of likability in all of the characters as well as the absurdity with the way they behave and what is the norm for them kind of ticked me off. Maybe I should explain what I mean by what I wrote above. The main protagonist, Kitty, is a Doe (her last name, like Jane Doe given to all unidentified corpses), meaning an orphan. Her only way of going up the social and life ladder is to ace the test every 17 (or 16?) year old has to take. Unfortunately Kitty gets a III.. which is a far cry from the royal VII as well as the desired V or even IV. Now she has to work in the sewers.. all the way in Nevada.. so what does she decide? oh.. just work at a prostitution house for 4 months until her boyfriend takes his test.. la di la di la.. oh so normal.. WHAT?! HOLD UP! I am at AWE at how NORMAL it is for this girl to decide to work as a prostitute and all her boyfriend say is 'I promise I'll get a VI and get you out of there'… say what? also.. some scenes in which people go 'hunting' but instead of hunting animals they hunt people who have ben exiled.. and when Kitty finds that out she's horrified for a couple of paragraphs.. then BACK TO NORMAL.. Another horrifying point is when someone she knew for a long time dies because of Kitty and the next couple of pages were dedicated to Kitty JUSTIFYING that it is for the best and that person really was in the wrong place at the wrong time. Just… the logic and lack of humanity in ALL the characters, the supposed good and evil is INFURIATING. I really couldn't stomach all characters and I really disliked every single one of them. Other than that, I felt that the plot line was wasted in terms of plain obvious revelations occurring in the book that just felt a bit too unrealistic. I had high hopes in regards to the dystopian side of the novel, and while I do like the incorporation of rebellion, I just can't understand some of the dynamic that are present in the novel. So many disconnected things happen in this novel that I wished were linked in a better way. The book felt choppy and I honestly started skimming paragraphs towards the end because I started getting restless (Reminded me of my restlessness when I read The Diviners). Unfortunately I am not going to be reading the sequel, because this whole book was a huge disappointment.  

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 27, 2013

    Must Read!

    I devoured this book within two days of it being out. I have always loved Aimee Carter's writing and read her books many times over. Pawn was no disappointment. Completely different, but important, tone from her other series. The characters will enamore you as will the dystopian world they live in. Absolutely loved it. Can't wait for the next one.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 12, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Exciting, Well-Told, Multidimensional In the spirit of Divergen

    Exciting, Well-Told, Multidimensional

    In the spirit of Divergent and The Selection comes PAWN, a young adult dystopian novel about a merit-based society caused by overpopulation.

    Kitty Doe grew up in a group home after her family was forced to give her up because they’d gone over their one child mandate. At 17, she is given a test that will determine her future place in society. Though she’s extremely smart and can memorize almost anything if given the opportunity, dyslexia causes her to perform poorly on the test and she is given a sewer worker job and forced to move far away from the love of her life, Benjy. When she acts out in a moment of anger over her newly realized destiny, she is exposed to a whole new world of trouble.

    Daxton Hart is the prime minister of the meritocracy and just so happens to need someone with Kitty’s unique physical attributes. He masks her into a replica of his recently murdered niece in an attempt to quiet those who hope to cause an uprising. With little choice in the matter, Kitty is suddenly thrust into the highest class of society when she is turned into Lila Hart. Taught by those closest to Lila, Kitty learns exactly how Lila acted and what motivated her in life. As Kitty tries to survive in this new role, she realizes no one she loves is safe as the Harts will use anyone she cares about to force her into submission.

    I was instantly caught up in PAWN’s world and the characters that brought it to life. The story is well-told, multidimensional and instantly appealing to anyone who loves the young adult dystopian genre. I would have liked a little more depth on the motivation of the characters—what compelled and inspired them, what made Celia or Knox want to fight for the Blackcoats, what drove the masked Daxton to the choices he made. Near the end I felt like the story lost a touch of it’s authenticity in its attempt to throw so many unexpected twists and revelations at the reader but not enough to keep me from wanting to jump right into the sequel.

    PAWN was exciting and kept me on the edge of my seat and I can’t wait to see what happens to Kitty, Benjy, Knox, and Greyson in CAPTIVE. If you love young adult dystopian novels even a fraction as much as I do then you should definitely give PAWN a try.

    **Complimentary copy provided by the author/publisher for an honest review.

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  • Posted June 6, 2014

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    From the description of this book, I felt like I wasn¿t really g

    From the description of this book, I felt like I wasn’t really going to like it. I put off reading it for a long time, as I was worried it just wouldn’t hold me interest. There is a lot of dystopian in the YA market now a days, and some of it just doesn’t click. However, Pawn clicked for me. 

    Aimee Carter did an excellent job establishing the world of Pawn. As it is a dystopian, it takes place in a futuristic United States, one that is a distorted version of our current country. The world building did not drag the beginning of the book down like it does in other books of this genre. The world was fully developed, and I found even a scarily possible future for the United States. Each person in society is assigned a number based on how they score on their test; this number determines a persons future. Kitty scores a III, a lower number than expected, which threatens her entire plans for the future. When faced with the possibility to escape from the ranks of the III and be elevated to a VII, the highest rank in the country, Kitty jumps at the opportunity without understanding the consequences.

    The main character, Kitty is forced to become Lila Hart after her death. Little does Kitty realize that becoming Lila, becoming a VII, does not make life easier. The Hart family, the leaders of the United States, are a very screwed up family. Corruption, lies, rebellions and secrets are abound, and Kitty is thrust into the middle of a power struggle. Little does Kitty know just how important she is to the Harts as Lila. This screwed up family and political atmosphere had me hooked. I needed to see how all the pieces were going to fall and wanted all the lies unraveled. 

    I really enjoyed that throughout the book, Kitty stayed true to herself despite being forced to assume the identity of someone else. While Kitty could have accepted the fact that her life was no longer her own, but instead she stayed true to who she was. Her determination and strength shone through her new exterior as Lila. Kitty could have been followed the instructions given to her by Daxton, Celia, or Augusta, but instead she took charge; she refused to become a pawn to either side. While her life was no longer her own, she still found ways to make decisions for herself despite her circumstances. She made me root for her. I had a few issues with the characterizations of some secondary characters, but I will be interested to see how all the characters develop and grow as the series continues. The romance in the book also felt a bit stale to me, probably because I did not have any connection to Benjy, a character I wished was a bit more fleshed out. 

    Pawn was fast paced, filled with twist and turns. The web of lies and deceptions is a messy one, but one that I wanted to get untangled, and Aimee Carter does a good job with revealing the truth throughout the book. The ending was heart-pounding, leaving Kitty in an even more precarious position than I thought possible. I cannot wait to see what other secrets will be revealed in the coming books. Thoroughly engaging and engrossing, with lies and secrets galore, Pawn is a great new start to a new series and I look forward to seeing what Aimee Carter plans to do with the rest of the series. 

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2014

    Amazing book

    I loved it but be warned its very sad

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  • Posted April 5, 2014

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    I was a little on the fence about this one. Since it seemed to

    I was a little on the fence about this one. Since it seemed to fall smack into the new "it" genre, I was a little wary on reading it. But, I like the author's first series, so I decided to give it a shot.

    I was intrigued with the idea of someone talking over the life of another. First, the complications of performing the vast amount of surgeries needed to make Kitty look exactly like Lila was mind blowing. But the thing that tripped me was they could even make Kitty sound exactly like Lilly, but kept her eyes? The exact reason why she was chosen to replace Lila was because she had the exact same color eyes. Well it's a damn good things she chose to steal something that day to get notices by the soldiers. How else would they have kept the public from knowing Lila was dead?

    Kitty takes her new life in stride, but its a very fine line she walks. The Prime Minster has some conditions to her new found status. Lila's mother and fiancee seem to have a different agenda entirely. But, how can she be sure they truly believe in the cause they want her to support? And how can the so callously gamble with her life? They know she's not the real Lila. And they know exactly what the Prime Minister has threatened to do should she choose to continue along the path that Lila had choosen.

    It's interesting watching Kitty learn who Lila really was. She may have been born a VII, with all the wealth and privileges that go along with it. But Lila saw something in the change she was tying to push forward. Kitty must decide if that rebellion is worth her life. Interestingly enough, she has the most experience with the people Lila was trying to inspire. Perhaps that will help her in her decisions. Can her effect on people cause and effect on herself?

    I liked some of the relationship dynamic building in this series. Kitty's relationship with Lila's mother is interesting. I can't quite get a read on her. The Prime Minister and the matriarchal mother often left me wondering who was really ruling this country. And, I was actually enjoying the build up of a love triangle. Maybe because I'm sure if it's suppose to be one?

    I'll be looking for the next book in this series. There are some serious plot twists that leave me wondering were we go from here!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2014

    Good read :)

    This is probably one of the better books I've read in a while. I feel like it was similar to The Hunger Games, but it was a copycat book. The idea was original and engaging. I wouldn't call it a page turner must it was very well written and deserves high regard. I would recommend this book to a teen between 13-16. I as a 14 year old enjoyed the book, but there was some content that wouldn't be appropriate for people under 13. Can't wait for the next book :)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2014

    Personally, I expected more from Ms. Carter. The Goddess Test Se

    Personally, I expected more from Ms. Carter. The Goddess Test Series was utterly fantastic, and this one was somewhat... disappointing. All in all, it was very interesting, just not as grabbing as I first expected when I picked it up. It's a good read if you just want to pass the time, but nothing worth spending too much time on.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2013

    Taken From My Blog: My Never Ending Pile of Books Kitty Doe is

    Taken From My Blog: My Never Ending Pile of Books

    Kitty Doe is your average teenage girl, stuck in a controlling and domineering society that sorts people by a ranking system, based off the roman numerals.  When Kitty is assigned the lowly category of a III, due to not being able to read or finish the test on time, she fears that her life is over. Her standing in society places her in a risky spot, one where any small crime can get her banished to Elsewhere, a cruel place no one in their right mind would ever wish to visit.




    Sad and forlorn, frustrated with her turn of luck in life, Kitty does the unthinkable: she commits a crime and steals food from a vendor, not knowing what will happen to her as consequence. When guards hunt her down no matter where she goes, she knows she's in for a fair bit of trouble. However, she never could have imagined how her life would change, all because of one orange.




    When she wakes up in a hospital-like setting, feeling anything but like herself, panic sets in. Not knowing where she is, she gets the shock of her life when she discovers she's been kidnapped and had body modification surgery performed on her against her will. She is now the replacement for a powerful figure in society, Lila Hart, and she is no longer a III. She is a VII, the highest level of society one can belong to.




    Pawn follows Kitty as she gets adjusted to her new life, where secrets and danger round every corner. She must learn to act just like Lila, a girl she's never met before in her life. Pressure is coming from many sides to behave in different ways, and death threats abound. Despite all this, Kitty remained strong and kept a level head. If I were her I would have broken down and given up, locking myself away and waiting for imminent death; it just would have been too much.




    I loved Benjy as well. Even with everything going on, he still stands by Kitty through thick and thin, remaining devoted and all hers. Daxton seemed nice as well, but sometimes I questioned his motives. I knew something was up with him and Cecelia from the beginning, but it took me a while to piece together the puzzle and figure out who they really were.




    Pawn was a thrilling story, set in a futuristic USA. With a corrupt government, murderers everywhere without shame and many lies and conspiracies, the story kept me on my toes and was believable. I can only hope that next year rolls around faster so I can read the next installment!

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  • Posted December 10, 2013

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    Read from December 05 to 06, 2013 Book Info  Kindle Edition


    Read from December 05 to 06, 2013




    Book Info 
    Kindle Edition, 304 pages
    Published November 26th 2013 by Harlequin Teen
    original title Pawn
    ASIN B00DPAN5E0
    series The Blackcoat Rebellion #1
    other editions (6)
    Source:Netgalley EARC




    Book Buy Links 
    AMAZON 
    B&N 




    BOOK SYNOPSIS








    YOU CAN BE A VII IF YOU GIVE EVERYTHING.




    For Kitty Doe, it seems like an easy choice. She can either spend her life as a III in misery, looked down upon by the higher ranks and forced to leave the people she loves, or she can become a VII and join the most powerful family in the country.




    If she says yes, Kitty will be Masked - surgically transformed into Lila Hart, the Prime Minister's niece, who died under mysterious circumstances. As a member of the Hart family, she will be famous. She will be adored. And for the first time, she will matter.




    There's only one catch. She must also stop the rebellion that Lila secretly fostered, the same one that got her killed, and one Kitty believes in. Faced with threats, conspiracies and a life that's not her own, she must decide which path to choose and learn how to become more than a pawn in a twisted game she's only beginning to understand.




    My Thoughts








    Living at poverty level along with a group of other “Extras” that share her low rank in society Kitty Doe resents the fact that most American citizens are treated as lesser by the Elitist ruling society. Having failed to make a good showing on the mandatory “ranking exam” that everyone undergoes at age 17, given a III instead of scoring high and being given a IV or above, Kitty decides that life in sewer maintenance and being shipped off to live in Denver Colorado is not something that she will accept as she holds out hope that her boyfriend 16 year-old Benjy will score a V or a VI when he turns 17 in a little over a month so they can marry and be together.




    Kitty has a sort of friend by the name of Tab who makes a living as a prostitute, the two plan to get Kitty a job working the streets also so that she can stay in DC until Benjy takes his ranking test. Having made the decision Kitty sets things up with Tab, against Benjy’s wishes, as she sees no other way to stay close and make a living.




    Kitty finds her plans changing when she is offered an alternative by the Prime Minister, being Masked to look like Lila Hart and given the designation of a VII sounds like something that could possibly lead to the life that Kitty thought she would never experience. However as with all things that sound too good to be true Kitty soon finds herself caught up in a power play that could cost her everyone and everything she holds dear.




    Kitty Doe is not as strong of a character as had hoped for but faced with the reality of her situation she begins to understand that she still has the ability to be more than a game piece that has no say in what she does or does not do, especially when she unearths the very astonishing truth that the Matriarch of the Hart family has managed to hide from almost everyone.




    This is a new twist on revenge being served cold, it proves that sometimes what we wish for is not exactly what we get and most of all it shows that even when things look quite bleak we can perhaps find a way to turn circumstances to our advantage.




    I honestly feel that in the ranks of the Dystopian Genre this book and series will find a niche and a following however for me even though know it has much more to offer in future stories am not planning on pursuing it further.
    [EArc from Netgalley in exchange for honest review]

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  • Posted December 3, 2013

    I had a lot of trouble putting this one down. I jumped at the op

    I had a lot of trouble putting this one down. I jumped at the opportunity to read Pawn on the day it was released. I loved Aimee Carter’s other series – The Goddess Test, and wanted to see what she wrote next. I had previously requested this title through NetGalley but since I couldn't wait to read it - I went ahead and purchased myself a copy.




    I’m glad I did because, I wasn’t disappointed. The book starts off with a bang. A dystopian setting and I felt it reminded me a bit of Sever (The Chemical Garden trilogy) which I absolutely loved. The first two chapters really had me itching to read more. In fact, I recommended Pawn to someone else, while reading it. The third chapter took a major twist for the story. Initially, I wasn’t sure how I felt about it. It was different – somewhat bold – and I wasn’t sure if I’d love the story or suddenly hate it. (I also hadn’t read the synopsis – now reading it, it’s not really such a shock).




    Pawn offered likeable and engaging characters, and a fast moving plot. There were twists and turns throughout the novel and as I said earlier, I had difficulty stopping at the end of a chapter.




    I’d recommend Pawn for lovers of Dystopian fiction. It is a series and the beginning of one – so be prepared to wait for the next novel. Hopefully, the wait won’t be too long.

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  • Posted December 1, 2013

    I usually have a hard time getting into a dystopian scenery. I l

    I usually have a hard time getting into a dystopian scenery. I loved Aimee Carter previous series so it was no surprise to see this book on my wish list. I grabbed the first day it hit on Netgalley and couldn’t wait to start, but the best part for me was getting to know Kitty and discovering more about the rebellion. I had no idea about the plot when I started but it was so fast to pull me in. We can really connect with Kitty and everything she’s going through. Her life was not easy and the world is so far away from perfect but when she got a second chance I was so hoping for her to grab it.




    Lila at first sounds like a princess but I loved the way she is more than a pretty face and Kitty suffered a lot to fit in and pass the tests. It was very disturbing knowing what they did and how simple it was to just substitute a person. Sick family, but the rebellion was the best part for me and Kitty chose the right side and really step up to help. I liked this fearless side of her, reminded me of Kate from Goddess Test series.




    I loved this book and will definitely catch the next one hoping for more Kitty adventures against the system.

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  • Posted November 26, 2013

    4.5/5 stars "Oh, what a tangled web we weave..." Wo

    4.5/5 stars


    "Oh, what a tangled web we weave..."

    Wow! This book completely took me by surprise! I was in no way prepared for all the secrets and twists and turns that Carter constructed! This is definitely making my list of favorite dystopian novels. I felt the world building was solid- detailed, but not SO detailed that I found myself bored. In fact, Pawn's pacing is very fluid and fast moving. I didn't want to put it down!

    Every year at the age of 17, a test is administered to discover what ranking you will be in society. II's and III's are considered lower caste while IV', V's, and VI's have more opportunities. VII's are reserved only for the ruling family, which currently is the Hart family. We begin the novel with our protagonist Kitty. Kitty is a girl who, after having grown up in a group home, has received her ranking in society and it's not a very good one. She has been deemed a III, which means her opportunities are few and far between. She has been assigned to sewer maintenance and is being relocated to Denver. I felt bad for Kitty because she is very bright and intelligent, but has never been able to learn to read. Her test results have consigned her to a fate that she never wanted and she refuses to bring anyone down with her. Her boyfriend, Benjy, is due to take his test soon and she knows he will do extremely well on it. He doesn't want her to leave and even suggests the two run away together. Yet, Kitty knows that Benjy is destined for greatness and she won't take that opportunity of a better life away from him. I admired her for that choice because it couldn't have been an easy one. Kitty knows her only option at this point is to meet up with a woman named Tabs and help her work the clubs (as a prostitute). Luckily, fate intervenes in the form of Daxton Hart, the Prime Minister, and offers her a chance at a new life as a VII.

    Kitty ultimately knows that going with Hart could lead to disastrous results, but what 17 year old girl wouldn't choose to change their status and potentially live a better life? Granted, there are always strings attached and Kitty must now step into a new role and fill someone else's shoes. It's not just her life on the line- the Harts rule by fear and they aren't afraid to send troublemakers to a place where they will never be heard from again. Daxton 'masks' Kitty, which means he completely alters her appearance to look like his dead niece, Lila.

    If it is one thing Kitty has learned by the end of this novel is that no one can truly be trusted, save for her boyfriend Benjy. Everyone has an agenda and will do and say whatever is necessary in order to further that agenda. Kitty is a pretty tough girl, but like most teenagers, is pretty egocentric. There is a rebellion that wants to get rid of the ranking system and go back to a more democratic society like so long ago and it turns out Lila had been a part of that. Now, Kitty as Lila, must step forward and make a decision as to whether she will extend her voice to help change a seriously flawed system. However, Kitty is hesitant- she is too afraid to step out of line for fear her loved ones will be harmed by Daxton and his witch of a mother, Augusta.

    I did find myself really liking Knox though. I wasn't sure where Carter was going to take his storyline, but it didn't take the love triangle route. While he also harbored his own secrets, I think he genuinely cared about Kitty and wanted to help this poor girl out. He is engaged to Lila Hart, the girl Kitty has now become. I felt a bit of chemistry between Kitty and Knox, and while I prefer him to Benjy, I don't know what Carter plans to do with these two.

    Again- this was such a fabulous, engaging read and it is definitely worth picking up, especially if you are looking for a new take on dystopian

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  • Posted November 26, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Thrilling, romantic, and full of secrets and betrayals, Pawn was

    Thrilling, romantic, and full of secrets and betrayals, Pawn was a wild ride of a book. And I loved it! It was absolutely wonderful. I really enjoyed reading this book.

    Kitty was a strong heroine. I liked that her reactions were believable. When she heard of a rebellion that, if she joined, would put her life in danger, she wasn't about to go near that. I think that's a realistic reaction, which made Kitty seem more real. Of course, when she found out what was at stake, she knew she had to join for everyone's sake. She was likable and I thought she was a great character.

    There wasn't a clear love interest in this book, but neither was there a love triangle. Kitty, when she was still Kitty and not Lila, had a boyfriend, Benji. Though, at first, she has to let him go, he joins the loop later on, so he's still part of her life. He's very sweet and devoted to Kitty. I thought he was adorable.

    Then, there's Lila's fiance, Knox, who is now Kitty's fiance. There were stirrings of romance between him and Kitty, but they didn't go very far. Knox was also wonderful. He's very sweet and determined to set the world to rights. But, he won't stoop to the government's level to do that. He was very honorable to the core. I really liked him.

    As for the romance, it was light in this book, the focus being more on the rebellion. And, as I said, it wasn't clear who the love  interest would be. So, we'll see how it goes in the later books.

    The world building was great. It was a little confusing at first, because we were having the new terms being thrown around and little explanation. So, I was a little lost in the beginning. But, later, it picks up, and things start to make more sense. The world that was created was dark, controlled, and very interesting. I look forward to seeing more of it.

    The plot was fast paced. I was kept interested the entire way through. There were a few parts that were a bit slow, but they were few and far between, so it wasn't a bother. There were plenty of secrets, surprises, and betrayals that kept me on the edge of my seat. There were quite a few shockers that I never saw coming. The really enjoyed the story and the ending has me anxious for book 2.

    Pawn was a fantastic YA dystopia. It was thrilling, romantic, and full of surprises. YA lovers, if you want something that will keep you hooked, then you have to check this book out.

    *I received a free copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review

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  • Posted November 26, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    ***Review posted on The Eater of Books! blog*** Pawn by Aime

    ***Review posted on The Eater of Books! blog***




    Pawn by Aimee Carter
    Book One of the Blackcoat Rebellion series
    Publisher: Harlequin TEEN
    Publication Date: November 5, 2013
    Rating: 4 stars
    Source: ARC sent by the publisher




    Summary (from Goodreads):




    YOU CAN BE A VII IF YOU GIVE EVERYTHING.




    For Kitty Doe, it seems like an easy choice. She can either spend her life as a III in misery, looked down upon by the higher ranks and forced to leave the people she loves, or she can become a VII and join the most powerful family in the country.




    If she says yes, Kitty will be Masked - surgically transformed into Lila Hart, the Prime Minister's niece, who died under mysterious circumstances. As a member of the Hart family, she will be famous. She will be adored. And for the first time, she will matter.




    There's only one catch. She must also stop the rebellion that Lila secretly fostered, the same one that got her killed, and one Kitty believes in. Faced with threats, conspiracies and a life that's not her own, she must decide which path to choose and learn how to become more than a pawn in a twisted game she's only beginning to understand.




    What I Liked:




    One of my first thoughts as I started this book was, oh, the social class thing. That's nothing new. Didn't Kiera Cass do a similar thing, with The Selection? Her system went from one to nine - one being awesome, nine being not-so-awesome (if I remember correctly). In this book, the social classes go from I to VII - VII being the best, I being the worst. So, I was like, really?




    And then, recently, I read a book called The Princess in the Opal Mask by Jenny Lundquist, which I rather enjoyed, mind you. In this book, there is a real princess, and then there is the girl who doubles as the princess, for the princess's protection. This book, Pawn, has that aspect in it as well. So, again, I was like, really?




    Well, it's a good thing I kept reading, despite my initial thoughts - I totally thought that this book would be very unoriginal. I mean, the concepts aren't really new. I read The Selection. I've read many, many dystopia novels. And I read The Princess in the Opal Mask. So, everything in this book should have felt very familiar, and I didn't think I would like that.




    Well, I'm glad I was wrong, in a sense. YES, the idea of this book is not new. YES, the concepts aren't new, the roles of the characters aren't all that original, and quite frankly, the general plot isn't new. BUT, the execution of this novel IS new and original. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and I'm glad that I stuck with it.




    Kitty has been given a second chance at getting a new ranking - a VII. Only the Harts, basically the royal family, get marked as VII. Which makes sense, because they want Kitty to became a royal family member: Lila Hart. All Kitty has to do is pretend that she is Lila, and she gets a life of luxury. But no freedom. No choices. And no Benjy (her boyfriend).




    It's not too long before Kitty realizes that things are just WRONG. Lila didn't die - she was murdered. Lila's mother will stop at nothing to get back at the Prime Minister (Lila's uncle). Lila's grandmother will stop at nothing to make sure that Kitty does everything she is supposed to do, as Lila. And Lila's fiance, Knox, is definitely not the puppet he seems.




    Believe me when I say that the plot of this novel is sooo not what I expected. It was a little slow at first, but once it picked up, I couldn't get enough. Yes, this book deals heavily with a rebellion and a tyrant and deception. But Carter throws plot twist after plot twist, which is really nice, because if she hadn't, it would be a typical dystopia novel, and I might have gotten bored and rolled my eyes a little. Just saying. 




    But anyway. The plot is superb, well constructed. The romance surprised me. I totally thought there would be a love triangle - there wasn't. At least, not really, in this book. There is one guy who holds Kitty's heart, and by the end of the book, you're sure of that. I like this. No love triangle, no shenanigans. 




    The ending isn't a cliffhanger, but it definitely leads into the next book. Like, this book could NOT be a standalone. Totally fine by me!




    What I Did Not Like:




    I already mentioned this above, but this book really reminded me of The Selection, and The Princess in the Opal Mask. The similarities weren't overwhelming or overbearing, but I definitely noticed them. For a while, I really thought this book would be just like any other dystopia novel - and it still is, with the rebellion and whatnot, but it's different, and different enough for me to keep reading.




    Would I Recommend It:




    I would! Don't miss this one - it's a great book! The action, high stakes, and different romance makes this one worth borrowing/buying/whatever (wait no, don't steal or pirate, please!). Do it!




    Rating:




    4 stars. A really great start to a new series! I'll definitely be reading the sequel (and probably any other books to follow, if the sequel delivers).

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  • Posted November 26, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    "Have you ever played chess, Kitty?" I eyed her. What

    "Have you ever played chess, Kitty?"
    I eyed her. What did a board game have to do with this? "Not really."
    "You and I should play sometime. I think you would like it," she said. "It's a game of strategy, mostly. The strong pieces are in the back row, while the weak pieces – the pawns – are all up front, ready to take the brunt of the attack. Because of their limited movement and vulnerability, most people underestimate them and only use them to protect the more powerful pieces. But when I play, I protect my pawns."

    I found the entire concept of this book interesting. I've read my fair share of dystopian books and I'm always looking for something that makes them unique. For me, it's often the characters. In this case, I really did like the characters – Kitty particularly – but the concept was what sucked me in. The idea that a test that you take when you're seventeen years old can determine your entire future is intriguing. Flawed in the way that dystopian societies tend to be, but intriguing all the same. The book started off with a bang and had enough secrets, lies and twists to keep me interested for the duration.

    Kitty was strong and determined and a lot smarter than her aptitude test made her out to be. I couldn't help but wonder throughout the book what her true score would have been had she been able to finish the test. I guess I'll probably never know. But it's interesting to think about regardless. In addition to being strong, determined and intelligent, Kitty was protective of those she cared about. In the form of true heroine, she was willing to risk herself for those she loved and for the bigger cause at hand.

    This book had a bit of a love triangle, but not in the traditional sense. Kitty's heart belonged to Benjy. It always had. Once she was Masked as Lila Hart, however, she found herself with the complication of a fiancé, Knox. I adored Benjy. He was sweet and caring in the way that childhood sweethearts are. He was a good guy and I hoped they would find each other again. But, I liked Knox, too. Sure he had his faults, but all in all, he was a nice guy. Kitty and Knox did have a mutual appreciation for each other and sometimes it seemed there could be more than that. But, first love dies hard. For both of them. Their partnership and friendship worked, too. They had an interesting dynamic.

    The romance was such a tiny piece of this book. It was a motivator for characters' actions, but otherwise it didn't play much of a part. There were so many intriguing characters in this book and so much more to learn about each and every one of them. The Harts are one screwed up family. The hunger for power and control was unreal. So were the manipulations, secrets and lies.

    The only struggle I had with this book was that the world building wasn't quite as detailed as I wanted it to be. Regardless of what type of book I'm reading, I want to feel like I'm fully immersed. I want to feel like I'm there. It could be because this book was set in the DC area, which is where I live, but I never really felt like I was someplace else. This book certainly had the creepy factor of a dystopian covered, but the lack of detail about the world itself kept me from feeling fully engaged.

    I really did enjoy the book. It sucked me in from the beginning and kept me surprised along the way. It was a very good start to a series I look forward to continuing.

    I received a copy of this book from the publisher, via Edelweiss, in exchange for an honest review. All quotes come from the review copy and may differ from the final version. 

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    Posted January 29, 2014

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    Posted August 4, 2014

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    Posted February 27, 2014

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