PC Magazine Guide to Home Networking

PC Magazine Guide to Home Networking

4.0 1
by Les Freed
     
 
Networking--it's not just for the office any more. Here's how to get all your electronic devices on the same team

Ready to plunge into creating your own home network? You couldn't ask for a better guide through the networking maze than PC Magazine contributing editor Les Freed. From why you should network to whether you need a switch or a hub and how to hook in your

Overview

Networking--it's not just for the office any more. Here's how to get all your electronic devices on the same team

Ready to plunge into creating your own home network? You couldn't ask for a better guide through the networking maze than PC Magazine contributing editor Les Freed. From why you should network to whether you need a switch or a hub and how to hook in your Playstation, reading this book is like having Les drop by and set the whole thing up for you. And you don't even need to move those back issues of PC Magazine off the couch.
* With expert advice, you can't go wrong
* Check out all the advantages of a home network
* Get a crash course in networking technology
* Design the network that fits your needs and your budget
* Compare wired and wireless products
* Learn how to prepare your computers for networking
* Whip up a specialized recipe from the Home Networking Cookbook
* Protect your investment with troubleshooting tips
* Build a network using the existing wiring in your home
* Discover how to keep your private information private
* Make all your home entertainment devices part of the network

Visit www.wiley.com/compbooks/pcmag

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Home networks are becoming increasingly popular (see also Computer Media, LJ 10/1/02) as the technology becomes more affordable and easier to set up and as households begin accumulating multiple PCs and other devices. For new users, PC Magazine presents a fairly nonthreatening guide to installing and configuring a new wired or wireless home network (although some sections are a little too background-heavy for absolute beginners). Screen shots, diagrams, and images help clarify concepts, while the discussion of how and why to network various devices illustrates the advantages of connection; appendixes covering multiple network layouts and troubleshooting are particularly helpful. Recommended for all libraries. For beginning to intermediate users, Bible is nicely thorough, yet its very comprehensiveness may overwhelm new networkers. Step-by-step instructions and straightforward prose, explanatory figures and screen shots, clear tips, and appendixes on troubleshooting and telecommuting highly recommend this guide to anyone setting up a home network. Particularly appropriate for larger public libraries serving telecommuters, home businesses, and others needing more heavy-duty networking advice. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780764544736
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
01/09/2004
Series:
PC Magazine Series, #4
Pages:
381
Product dimensions:
7.42(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.83(d)

Meet the Author

LES FREED has been a PC Magazine contributing editor since 1994. He installed his first home network in the late 1980s, and is the author or coauthor of fourteen books on networking, computing, and digital photography. With his long-time collaborator Frank Derfler, Les shared a Computer Press Association award in 1993 for How Networks Work, now in its sixth edition.

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PC Magazine Guide to Home Networking 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Directed at a very general audience. Freed does not assume you are proficient with either hardware or software related to building out a home network. He gives careful exposition of a wired ethernet LAN and of the increasingly popular wireless LAN. For the wired LAN, he really does start from the basics. There is a closeup photo of an RJ-45 connector, as a good example. This is one of those things that computer professionals have known for years. And once you know something like this, you've subsumed the knowledge so thoroughly that it is axiomatic. So it's easy to forget that for many people, RJ-45 is forbidding gibberish. That is just one case. He follows it up with a photo of common cable tools. In other words, you can take this book to an electrical supplies store and find the items. Some of you may laugh at this. But there are people out there who really need this basic advice. (Perhaps you?) Most of the book is this way. Broad appeal.