PDR Drug Guide for Mental Health Professionals

Overview

The growing use of psychotropic drugs has brought new opportunities and fresh challenges to the mental health care professional. That's why this drug guide was created: to help you understand the beneficial effects-and the dangerous side effects-of today's potent psychotherapeutic medications. Its focus is psychotropic drugs-over 70 common ones are profiled by brand name. When you need to know-you need this guide. Expanded Scope Includes Most Common Prescription Drugs
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Overview

The growing use of psychotropic drugs has brought new opportunities and fresh challenges to the mental health care professional. That's why this drug guide was created: to help you understand the beneficial effects-and the dangerous side effects-of today's potent psychotherapeutic medications. Its focus is psychotropic drugs-over 70 common ones are profiled by brand name. When you need to know-you need this guide. Expanded Scope Includes Most Common Prescription Drugs
Because it covers the emotional and psychological side effects of all the most commonly used prescription drugs-and details how they can interact with psychotropic medications-this PDR guide can suggest potential solutions to a broad range of unexplained clinical problems. A global view of the patient's total medication profile often yields a simple solution to seemingly intractable dilemmas.

Detailed profiles of over 70 common psychotropic drugs
· organized by brand name
· written in a non-technical style
· gives proper usage and administration of each drug
· includes common side effects, special warnings, and contraindications

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Nicholas Greco IV, MS, BCETS, CATSM (Columbia College of Missouri)
Description: This condensed, straightforward, informative drug guide is the first of its kind directed at nonphysician mental health professionals.
Purpose: The purpose is to provide an effective, jargon-free handbook for the mental health professional. This drug guide is designed to meet the needs of clinicians in practice as well as those in teaching and research. The editors of the PDR have developed a uniquely distinct guide which is clearly not a carbon copy or a watered-down version of the traditional PDR. Given the complexity of the mental health field and the ever-changing clinical environment, this guide is a genuinely worthy contribution.
Audience: It is written mainly for nonphysician mental health professionals who routinely are providing services such as psychotherapy to patients who are on a number of psychotropic medications from other physician providers. The book is written at an appropriate level and clearly seeks to educate and inform the mental health professional.
Features: The guide is quite impressive and is divided into five sections. Section one provides detailed psychotropic drug profiles for 72 medications. These are arranged alphabetically for quick reference. Section two details the potential interactions with psychotropic medications. Section three discusses the most common prescription drugs and their uses. Section four discusses the mental and emotional side effects of medications. Section five provides an overview of 35 herbs and nutritional supplements which are currently available for emotional and mental problems. Readers will appreciate the appendix which lists over 500 prescription drug products with the potential for abuse. Abuse is ranked by high, medium, or low potential. Finally, the indexes are the quick reference for the busy clinician. One of the glaring shortcomings is the lack of a product identification guide which many of us have become accustomed to when working with patients. This guide is in the PDR and is a beneficial resource as it shows the actual tablet, capsule, etc. of the medication. Perhaps the second edition will have this guide.
Assessment: Overall, this a very impressive and user friendly drug guide. The standard PDR is quite cumbersome compared to this 861-page marvel. This drug guide is an informative, unbiased, and highly focused source for the busy mental health professional. It is a must have and is exceptionally well-priced for the wealth of information it provides.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Nicholas Greco IV, MS, BCETS, CATSM (Columbia College of Missouri)
Description: This condensed, straightforward, informative drug guide is the first of its kind directed at nonphysician mental health professionals.
Purpose: The purpose is to provide an effective, jargon-free handbook for the mental health professional. This drug guide is designed to meet the needs of clinicians in practice as well as those in teaching and research. The editors of the PDR have developed a uniquely distinct guide which is clearly not a carbon copy or a watered-down version of the traditional PDR. Given the complexity of the mental health field and the ever-changing clinical environment, this guide is a genuinely worthy contribution.
Audience: It is written mainly for nonphysician mental health professionals who routinely are providing services such as psychotherapy to patients who are on a number of psychotropic medications from other physician providers. The book is written at an appropriate level and clearly seeks to educate and inform the mental health professional.
Features: The guide is quite impressive and is divided into five sections. Section one provides detailed psychotropic drug profiles for 72 medications. These are arranged alphabetically for quick reference. Section two details the potential interactions with psychotropic medications. Section three discusses the most common prescription drugs and their uses. Section four discusses the mental and emotional side effects of medications. Section five provides an overview of 35 herbs and nutritional supplements which are currently available for emotional and mental problems. Readers will appreciate the appendix which lists over 500 prescription drug products with the potential for abuse. Abuse is ranked by high, medium, or low potential. Finally, the indexes are the quick reference for the busy clinician. One of the glaring shortcomings is the lack of a product identification guide which many of us have become accustomed to when working with patients. This guide is in the PDR and is a beneficial resource as it shows the actual tablet, capsule, etc. of the medication. Perhaps the second edition will have this guide.
Assessment: Overall, this a very impressive and user friendly drug guide. The standard PDR is quite cumbersome compared to this 861-page marvel. This drug guide is an informative, unbiased, and highly focused source for the busy mental health professional. It is a must have and is exceptionally well-priced for the wealth of information it provides.

4 Stars! from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781563634574
  • Publisher: Physicians Desk Reference Inc
  • Publication date: 11/12/2002
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 256
  • Product dimensions: 5.34 (w) x 7.36 (h) x 1.76 (d)

Table of Contents

I. Psychotropic Drug Profiles
Descriptions of 72 medications used in the treatment of emotional and psychological disorders. Organized alphabetically by brand name with cross-references by generic name.
II. Interactions with Psychotropic Drugs
Lists drugs that interact with each psychotropic medication. Describes each potential effect.
III. Common Prescription Drugs
Brief descriptions of the most frequently used prescription medications and their uses. Includes over 1,200 entries.
IV. Mental and Emotional Side Effects
Part 1 lists 175 psychological side effects and the various drugs that can cause them. Part 2 lists each of the drugs and the side effects that they cause. Includes incidence data when available.
V. Psychotropic Herbs and Supplements
Brief descriptions of 35 herbs and nutritional supplements. Includes uses, mechanism of action, contraindications, cautions, possible drug interactions, use-in-pregnancy information, typical dosage, and overdosage information. Organized alphabetically by common name.
APPENDIX
Prescription Drugs with Potential for Abuse
Lists products with high, medium, and low abuse potential.
INDICES
Brand and Generic Name Index
Psychotropic Drugs Indexed by Indication
Psychotropic Drugs Indexed by Category
Psychotropic Herbs and Supplements Indexed by Indication
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Foreword

The mental health field has changed enormously during the past half-century.  Today fewer than one of every ten clinicians is a psychiatrist.  In contrast to the 35,000 physicians currently in psychiatric practice in the United States, there are 70,000 psychologists, nearly 200,000 social workers, and 50,000 marriage and family therapists.  It is for all these other clinicians that the PDR Drug Guide for Mental Health Professionals has been designed. Although they do not actually prescribe medications, these professionals often play a key collaborative role in medication decisions, and an increasing percentage of their psychotherapy clients are also taking psychotropic drugs.  Clearly an effective drug guide is a necessity for today’s mental health practitioner — and this book does an outstanding job of addressing this long-overlooked need.

In the past, the mental health field was dominated by narrow schools of thought and heated conflicts.  Clients were forced to choose — between psychotherapy and medications, between psychologists and psychiatrists, between outpatient resources and inpatient care.    Today, although the field is still marked by wide differences of opinion, approach, and professional training, there is a growing movement toward collaboration and integration.  Practitioners have been pushed in this direction — sometimes kicking and screaming — by the results of clinical research.

Studies have revealed, for example, that psychotherapy and medication are each of great help to people suffering from depression.  About two-thirds of such individuals are able to overcome their disorder when they receive cognitive, interpersonal, or certain other types of psychotherapy; a similar percentage are helped by antidepressant drug therapy; and, according to some research, an even higher percentage may be helped by a combination of the two approaches.  A parallel story has unfolded in the treatments of panic, obsessive-compulsive, and several other disorders.  Even treatments for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder — where medication typically plays a dominant role — are, according to research, greatly enhanced by the addition of psychotherapy, community interventions, and/or case management.

Just as medications and psychotherapy are often used together in the clinical field today, it is now common for psychiatrists and other mental health professionals to work side by side.  In mental hospitals, clinics, and counseling centers, patients often work with a team of professionals, receiving medication from one, therapy from another, and, in some cases, case management from a third.  Similarly, in private practice, clients’ psychotherapy sessions with psychologists, social workers, or other professionals are often supplemented by visits to psychiatrists (also referred to as “psychopharmacologists” in this context) who focus exclusively on their medication needs.  In all such instances, mental health professionals play a key role in drug therapy — whether by referring the client to the best psychopharmacologist, by discussing the case and the impact of medication with the psychopharmacologist, or by watching for the effects of medication — both wanted and unwanted — over the course of psychotherapy. It is also worth noting that this role may soon become even more prominent, since some state legislatures are now deciding whether to license psychologists to prescribe psychotropic drugs.

All these changes in the clinical field point in the same direction: mental health professionals today must be as knowledgeable as possible about psychotropic drugs.  A key resource in the acquisition and application of this knowledge is an effective drug reference, and, as I noted earlier, the PDR Drug Guide for Mental Health Professionals addresses this need extraordinarily well.  There are a number of very useful features in this book.  Let me cite several that I find particularly valuable.

First, the book is structured specifically to meet the needs of clinicians in practice.  It readily provides complete profiles of each psychotropic drug, including such information as when and when not to use the drug, undesired effects, interactions with foods and other drugs, and other special precautions and concerns.  One section of the book is even organized by side effect rather than drug name, to help clinicians better determine whether a new symptom is drug-related or not.

Second, the book reaches beyond psychotropic drugs to include information on psychotropic herbs and supplements, which have become such an important force in our society.  Similarly it includes descriptions of the many other common prescription drugs that a patient may be taking along with psychotropic medication.

Third, the book is written without medical jargon in a manner that is clear, yet detailed and informative.  This is not a cut-and-paste version of the PDR.  It was obviously written especially for mental health professionals — taking into consideration their background as well as their clinical needs.

Whenever I am asked to write a foreword for a book, my initial reaction is one of extreme caution and even reluctance.  A foreword is, after all, perceived by some as an implicit endorsement, and is not something to be undertaken lightly.  Obviously, I have been impressed by this book and by the importance of such a reference work given the current climate in the field of mental health care.  In addition to the features that I have already mentioned, two other aspects of this book finally won me over and convinced me to write the foreword.  One, the book emphasizes the limitations of each drug every bit as much as its potential strengths.  It is not a “pro-drug” book. Instead, it simply seeks to inform professionals, even-handedly and authoritatively.  Two, the book has a good feel for the appropriate roles of both psychotherapy and drug therapy in treatment today.  For example, in the discussion of a drug for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, the book states, “It is important to remember that the drug is only part of the overall management of ADHD, and that the doctor should also recommend counseling or other therapy.”  That is my kind of guide book — balanced, evidence-based, and genuinely informative.

 

Ronald J. Comer, Ph.D.

Director of Clinical Psychology Studies

Department of Psychology, Princeton University

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