Peace is the Way

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Overview

Deepak Chopra?s passionate new book, Peace Is the Way, was inspired by a saying from Mahatma Gandhi: ?There is no way to peace. Peace is the way.? In a world where every path to peace has proved futile, the one strategy that hasn?t been tried is the way of peace itself. ?We must not bring one war to an end, or thirty,? Chopra tells us, ?but the idea of war itself.?

How can this be done?

By facing the truth that war is satisfying, and then ...

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Overview

Deepak Chopra’s passionate new book, Peace Is the Way, was inspired by a saying from Mahatma Gandhi: “There is no way to peace. Peace is the way.” In a world where every path to peace has proved futile, the one strategy that hasn’t been tried is the way of peace itself. “We must not bring one war to an end, or thirty,” Chopra tells us, “but the idea of war itself.”

How can this be done?

By facing the truth that war is satisfying, and then substituting new satisfactions so that violence is no longer appealing. “War has become a habit. We reach for it the way a chain smoker reaches for a cigarette, promising to quit but somehow never kicking the habit.” But Chopra tells us that peace has its own power, and our task now is to direct that power and multiply it one person at a time.

Behind the numbing headlines of violence running out of control there are unmistakable signs of a change—Chopra believes that a majority of people are ready to see an end to war. “Right now 23 million soldiers serve in armies around the world. Can’t we find ten times that number who will dedicate themselves to peace? A hundred times?”

Peace Is the Way challenges each of us to take the next leap in personal evolution. “You aren’t asked to be a saint, or to give up any belief. You are only asked to stop reacting out of fear, to change your allegiance from violence to peace.” In a practical seven-step program, Chopra shows the reader how to become a true peacemaker. “Violence may be innate in human nature, but so is its opposite: love. The next stage of humanity, the leap which we are poised to take, will be guided by the force of that love.” This is more than a hope or an aspiration. It is a new way of being in the world, giving each individual the power to end war in our time.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“The daily practices suggested in this book offer readers a way to become more fully human and actively engaged as peacemakers in their homes and communities.” —Desmond Tutu, Nobel Peace Laureate, 1984, archbishop emeritus of Cape Town, and author of God Has a Dream: A Vision of Hope for Our Time

“Deepak Chopra brings the idea of peace and the power it has over conflict, hatred, and despair into focus. He offers a clear pathway to make this world a better place for us all.” —Muhammad Ali, U.N. Ambassador of Peace

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780739319963
  • Publisher: Random House Audio Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 1/18/2005
  • Series: Deepak Chopra Series
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Abridged, 3 CDs, 4 hours
  • Product dimensions: 5.85 (w) x 4.77 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Deepak Chopra's books have become international bestsellers. Dr. Chopra is founder of The Chopra Center in Carlsbad, California. Visit his website at www.chopra.com.

Deepak Chopra's books have become international bestsellers. Dr. Chopra is founder of The Chopra Center in Carlsbad, California. Visit his website at www.chopra.com.

Biography

The practice of holistic and mind-body medicine has long been a controversial subject among medical professionals. Some view it as a healthy and natural alternative to chemical pharmaceuticals. Others see it as a system of placebos and new-age chicanery. No matter where one stands on this issue, there is no denying the influence that mind, body, and spirit practitioner Deepak Chopra has had on the world of medicine.

Chopra's bestselling books on a variety of topics have been translated into 35 languages. His lectures, seminars, and learning materials are immensely popular, as are his television specials for PBS. In addition, he has founded his own medical center called the Chopra Center for Well Being and has won fans amongst celebrities ranging from Prince Charles to Mikhail Gorbachev to Demi Moore to David Lynch. When financier/philanthropist Michael Milken was diagnosed with prostate cancer, he claimed that Chopra's holistic methods shrunk his lymph nodes by 90%.

Chopra's interest in alternative medicine initially grew out of concern for his own health. After moving from India to set up a practice medicine in Boston some 25 years ago, Chopra succumbed to many of the stresses that plague medical professionals. As a result, he guzzled coffee, chain-smoked, and drank heavily. Once he began studying eastern philosophies by way of Krishnamurti and Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, he became aware of medical practices outside of the sometimes limited western perspective. This awakening changed his life.

While Chopra is viewed as a major proponent of the role of Eastern philosophies in healing, he does not reject western medicine. In fact, what makes his approach so unique is the way he incorporates the best aspects of western medical research into his theories. This amalgamation of medical philosophies is at the root of self-help volumes like Restful Sleep, Perfect Weight, and Boundless Energy. Elsewhere, Chopra has addressed such diverse issues as reversing the aging process (Ageless Body, Timeless Mind), perfecting personal relationships (The Path to Love), and achieving capitalist goals via Eastern philosophies (The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success).

Chopra has also become concerned with the causes of war and violence and the principles of Eastern religions, especially Buddhism, and his books on these subjects have garnered praise from such major international figures as the Dalai Lama, Desmond Tutu, and Boutros-Boutros Ghali. Consequently, Chopra continues to play a significant role in world health and world politics in spite of detractors and skeptics. With an immense body of work behind him and more volumes of wisdom sure to follow, he continues to preach the simple philosophy he is certain is the key to understanding ourselves, mentally and physically: "We're not human beings that have occasional spiritual experiences, it's the other way around: we're spiritual beings that have occasional human experiences."

Good To Know

In 1999, Time magazine named Chopra one of the Top 100 Icons and Heroes of the Century.

Chopra's father was a prominent cardiologist and an anglophile who distrusted Indian philosophies and alternative medical practices.

Despite his reputation as a serious-minded intellectual, Chopra describes himself as "playful" and "carefree."

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    1. Also Known As:
      Deepak Chopra M.D.
    2. Hometown:
      La Jolla, California
    1. Date of Birth:
      October 22, 1946
    2. Place of Birth:
      New Delhi, India
    1. Education:
      All India Institute of Medical Sciences

Read an Excerpt

War Ends Today

Today is a good day for war to come to an end.

The symbolic number of 1,000 U.S. casualties was passed today in Iraq--I am writing this on September 9, 2004--most of the deaths occurring after victory was declared over a year ago. What is the world like on the day you read this? I cannot predict, but I know, even if this particular war is over, you will be confronted with terrorism, suicide bombings, insurrections and civil war somewhere on the planet, and nuclear threats from rogue nations like North Korea and Iran. Violence will still be raging out of control, no matter what day you read these words.

At the outset of 2003 it was estimated that thirty military conflicts were being fought around the world. It's a good day for all these wars to come to an end. But will they? And if they do, what will replace them?

To end war, you have to think of ending not just one conflict, and not just thirty. What we have to end is the idea of war, which has turned into the habit of war, and then into the numbing constancy of war. The last time the U.S. wasn't on a war footing was December 6, 1941, the day before Pearl Harbor inflamed the U.S. into declaring war against Japan. Since then, America has accepted the need for a huge standing army, the growth of arms manufacturers and merchants into a massive part of the economy, thousands of troops stationed around the world, intensive research into new technologies of death, and a political climate in which it is suicide to come out against war. This whole situation, which reaches into every home, keeps us on a war footing even when there is no declared war to grab the headlines.

Like any habit, war has worn a groove in our minds, so that when we become very afraid or very angry, the response of war comes naturally. It has an easy track to follow. Even as the body count rises in the Sunni Triangle and the photographs of torture from Abu Ghraib prison stun one's conscience, the groove is still there, deep and familiar. War has almost become a secret pleasure. It brings excitement and revs up the routine pace of life. In Mira Nair's film adaptation of Vanity Fair, a woman comments smugly at a party, "War is good for men. It's like turning over the soil." We reach for war the way a chain-smoker reaches for a cigarette, muttering all the while that we have to quit. In the past four decades America's war habit has led us into Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, Somalia, Lebanon, Panama, Grenada, Vietnam, and Cambodia, not to mention more covert military operations into places like Laos, Nicaragua, and Colombia.

This book is about erasing that groove and substituting a new way to respond when we are very afraid or very angry, or even when we aren't. The way of peace has to become a new habit. To do that, it must offer a substitute for every single thing that war now provides. You may feel immune to the appeal of war, but everyone has benefited from war's gifts in some measure.

War provides an outlet for national vengeance.
It satisfies the demands of fear.
It brings power to the victor.
It provides security to the homeland.
It opens an avenue for getting what you want by force.

By contrast, living in peace one breathes easily. There is space to allow for connections with other people. Arguments proceed with mutual respect for either side. Mahatma Gandhi, Nelson Mandela, and Mother Teresa lived different aspects of peace. We learned from each that the way of peace can...

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First Chapter

War Ends Today

Today is a good day for war to come to an end.

The symbolic number of 1,000 U.S. casualties was passed today in Iraq—I am writing this on September 9, 2004—most of the deaths occurring after victory was declared over a year ago. What is the world like on the day you read this? I cannot predict, but I know, even if this particular war is over, you will be confronted with terrorism, suicide bombings, insurrections and civil war somewhere on the planet, and nuclear threats from rogue nations like North Korea and Iran. Violence will still be raging out of control, no matter what day you read these words.

At the outset of 2003 it was estimated that thirty military conflicts were being fought around the world. It's a good day for all these wars to come to an end. But will they? And if they do, what will replace them?

To end war, you have to think of ending not just one conflict, and not just thirty. What we have to end is the idea of war, which has turned into the habit of war, and then into the numbing constancy of war. The last time the U.S. wasn't on a war footing was December 6, 1941, the day before Pearl Harbor inflamed the U.S. into declaring war against Japan. Since then, America has accepted the need for a huge standing army, the growth of arms manufacturers and merchants into a massive part of the economy, thousands of troops stationed around the world, intensive research into new technologies of death, and a political climate in which it is suicide to come out against war. This whole situation, which reaches into every home, keeps us on a war footing even when there is no declared war to grab the headlines.

Likeany habit, war has worn a groove in our minds, so that when we become very afraid or very angry, the response of war comes naturally. It has an easy track to follow. Even as the body count rises in the Sunni Triangle and the photographs of torture from Abu Ghraib prison stun one's conscience, the groove is still there, deep and familiar. War has almost become a secret pleasure. It brings excitement and revs up the routine pace of life. In Mira Nair's film adaptation of Vanity Fair, a woman comments smugly at a party, "War is good for men. It's like turning over the soil." We reach for war the way a chain-smoker reaches for a cigarette, muttering all the while that we have to quit. In the past four decades America's war habit has led us into Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, Somalia, Lebanon, Panama, Grenada, Vietnam, and Cambodia, not to mention more covert military operations into places like Laos, Nicaragua, and Colombia.

This book is about erasing that groove and substituting a new way to respond when we are very afraid or very angry, or even when we aren't. The way of peace has to become a new habit. To do that, it must offer a substitute for every single thing that war now provides. You may feel immune to the appeal of war, but everyone has benefited from war's gifts in some measure.

War provides an outlet for national vengeance.
It satisfies the demands of fear.
It brings power to the victor.
It provides security to the homeland.
It opens an avenue for getting what you want by force.

By contrast, living in peace one breathes easily. There is space to allow for connections with other people. Arguments proceed with mutual respect for either side. Mahatma Gandhi, Nelson Mandela, and Mother Teresa lived different aspects of peace. We learned from each that the way of peace can end suffering and oppression, not by warring against an enemy but by bearing witness to wrongs, and by allowing sympathy and common humanity to do their patient work. War smothers all of that.

War's gifts may prove bitter and empty in the end, but that hasn't eroded the groove of war in our minds. Today, after a century in which more than 100 million people died from war, we survivors still turn to war because we think it does some good. The satisfaction of waging war cannot be replaced by philosophy or religion. The Buddha and the Prince of Peace could not have spoken out more strongly against violence, yet their beliefs have been distorted into a cause for bloodshed at the hands of their followers.

Our age is steeped in mechanized warfare that is totally terrifying in human terms. Somewhere in this country teams of scientists are working on a bomb that will vaporize human beings on contact without destroying the buildings they inhabit. Somewhere in this country other scientists are figuring out how to disrupt an enemy's water, electricity, communications, and transportation using signals delivered by the Internet. Soon we may be able to cripple other nations without even having to set foot in them.

We are almost there now, thanks to high-altitude pinpoint bombing and long-range "smart bombs" that can guide themselves to their targets while our soldiers remain safely out of harm's reach. This technology makes some people, even in the military, very queasy, for it means that our army can kill at leisure without loss of life on our side. The last vestige of honor on the battlefield was respect for the enemy, but no more. The satisfaction of managing death so efficiently has to be added to the list of war's gifts.

Can the way of peace really substitute for all that? Can it succeed where centuries of wisdom and morality have failed?

It can, because the way of peace isn't based on religion or morality. It doesn't ask us to become saints overnight, or to renounce our feelings of anger or our thirst for revenge. What it asks for is something new: conscious evolution.

The time has come for us to stop being passive, and to take control of our own destiny, one person at a time. What keeps war alive? Backwardness of response, a reliance on reactions that human beings have followed since the beginning of history. Violence is not the essence of human nature. It is prevalent, yes, and it is innate. But so is the opposite of violence: love. The way of peace is love in action. Although humankind, explicitly or implicitly, seems to believe that violence is more powerful than love, this is the same as saying that death is more powerful than life.

That simply isn't so. Humanity has evolved to transcend many things that once seemed innate. We have learned to use reason triumphantly. We have overcome superstition and disease. We have exposed the darkness of the psyche to light. We have delved deep into the workings of nature. All these successes point the way to the next step, which is the realization that human beings have outgrown war.

Today isn't the day that I or anyone else can say that human beings are finally and forever beyond war. The only recent news item that gives hope is a small one, a piece of reported data which says that the last twelve months, despite the headlines from Iraq, brought the fewest deaths in war since 1945, the end of World War II. The total body count from all conflicts over the last year was 20,000 worldwide. So the trend may be starting already. You and I, in our anguish to end war, may be catching tremors from the future.

Today is the day to act on them. Just as Newton's formulation of gravity meant that human beings were finally and forever on the road of a new science, a road that has led to a completely transformed world, you and I can create a new turning point. I would argue that for the majority of people in America--and many other parts of the world--the tide of the future has turned already. People are ready to follow the way of peace, if only they can learn what it is.

The way of peace is based on the same thing that ushered in the age of science: a leap in consciousness. When they witnessed demonstrations of steam engines, electric lights, and vaccines, people adapted to them at the level of their own awareness. The idea of being human could no longer be consistent with reading by candlelight, traveling by horse, suffering through high rates of death in childbirth, short life spans, and the ravages of disease. A leap in collective consciousness took place.

The way of peace, I believe, can change the future in the same way. If you and I demonstrate that peace is more satisfying than war, the collective consciousness will shift. Today you and I woke up and found it easy not to kill anyone. Our society, however, can't say the same. It's time for society to take a direction that conforms to what the individual wants. There can be no excuse for living our comfortable lives embedded in a culture of mechanized death and violence. You and I are not innocent bystanders to war. We depend upon it politically, economically, and socially. I will show in detail why this is true, and how we can shift our allegiance to a way of life that is not entangled in war or death. The more people who join us, the faster war will come to an end. Instead of wishing that others would stop killing, you can become a force for peace, and in so doing make the ultimate contribution.

If you shift your allegiance to peace, war ends for you today. This happens one person at a time, but it works. A million tiny earthquakes move more ground than a single cataclysmic quake. There is no better or easier way to live than by catching the wave of evolution. How hard is it to look up and say, Today is a good day for war to end. If your consciousness follows these words and remains true to them, war will never return to your life again.
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2009

    Good Book

    great stuff. recommend it to any peace advocate.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2005

    Take this important book to heart and make practical use of it.

    Surveys constantly reaffirm to us that our number one desire is for world peace - yet we also feel powerless in our efforts to create it. If ever there was a time and a real place to form a ¿global community of conscious peace makers¿, that time is now and the place is now described in detail in Deepak Chopra¿s latest masterpiece, Peace is the Way. This is the time to take the important steps in the direction of personal evolution. Our chosen way of being in the world has more than a personal consequence: it is truly the power necessary to create the peace we desire both personally and globally. We¿re not talking about an anti-war movement. We¿re talking about a peace movement as in moving with peace. With much-needed insights on why we are NOT creating peace, Chopra writes on The Myth of Security, The Metaphysics of Terror and The Chemistry of Anger he delivers the solutions in Putting the Body at Peace, God is Revealed in Stages and Seven Practices for Peacemakers. Chopra clearly outlines how each one of us can end war one person at a time. Take this important book to heart and make practical use of it. Each of us has our own individual wars within ourselves, our families, our communities, etc. Our contribution to ourselves and to humanity must be to ¿be for, think for, feel for, speak for, act for, create for and share for peace¿. There IS something you can do. Start with understanding how.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2005

    Brilliant Read

    This is one of my favourite Deepak Chopra books -- brilliant. And practical, too. You'll love this read, and then you'll want to get your friends to read it, too! Ailsa www.buildyourownhouse.ca/ailsa/books.htm

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2005

    Solutions for a troubled world

    This book is another outstanding, thought-provoking selection from Deepak Chopra that explains the basis of the senseless and needless violence of today's troubled world and offers spiritual solutions for ending the chaos and bloodshed. The world's spiritual teachers all understand that humanity cannot long continue on its current path which will almost certainly lead to utter destruction on this planet, yet the answer is to stop viewing ourselves as victims of the 'less than human' villains--'Others'--and begin respecting our common humanity. When we question the cultural, religious, and political forces that motivate and influence our spheres of existence, we can begin to see other people as ordinary people like ourselves with the same desire for happiness and live the way of peace. In this extensively researched book, Dr. Chopra provides the historical, social, and psychological underpinnings of how the world arrived at the place it now finds itself, living in constant fear of extremists and terrorists which can be found in all cultures and religions. I especially loved the epilogue which is an apt and wise conclusion to the book's premise. It features the Buddhist fable of Sticky Hair and Prince Five Weapons which teaches that compassion is the most potent weapon we can use to utterly destroy our enemies.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2005

    Chopra's Brave New World

    Deepak Chopra juxtaposes current events with the wisdom of the ancient sages. While recognizing a growing threat of xenophobia and a collective fatigue with the same old solutions to the same old problems, Chopra offers simple day to day suggestions for individuals to raise peace consciousness in our personal little corner of the world.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2008

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