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Peace Week in Miss Fox's Class
     

Peace Week in Miss Fox's Class

by Eileen Spinelli, Anne Kennedy (Illustrator)
 

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Miss Fox is tired of hearing her young students quarrel. So she announces Peace Week—no more squabbling for one whole week! The children chime in with their own rules: no fighting, don't say mean things, and help others. Throughout the week each of the little animals gets a chance to practice this new behavior. When Polecat teases Bunny for wearing a

Overview

Miss Fox is tired of hearing her young students quarrel. So she announces Peace Week—no more squabbling for one whole week! The children chime in with their own rules: no fighting, don't say mean things, and help others. Throughout the week each of the little animals gets a chance to practice this new behavior. When Polecat teases Bunny for wearing a bright yellow sweater, instead of poking fun back at Polecat, Bunny admires his sweater. Soon, to their surprise, the animals are finding that it's easy to help others, take turns, and say nice things, even when someone is grumpy to them. Wouldn't it be nice, Squirrel says, if every week could be Peace Week?

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Tired of all the quarreling in her classroom, Miss Fox declares a Peace Week. The anthropomorphic kids decide on the rules: No fighting. No saying mean things. Help others. Throughout the week, they try to follow the rules. On Monday, Squirrel stops annoying his sister by bouncing nuts on the gate. On Tuesday, Bunny responds to Polecat's teasing with a nice reply instead of a nasty one. On Wednesday, Mouse stops some little mice from fighting. On Thursday, Frog compliments Mr. Turtle on his garden, even though Mr. Turtle is a grump who has scolded him. On Friday, Young Bear remembers it is Peace Week and makes peace with Sister Bear. The peacemaking continues on Saturday. On Monday, the students all tell Miss Fox about their Peace Week. They celebrate, suggesting that every week should be Peace Week. If only it were that easy� Kennedy uses watercolors, ink and dyes to create a lively crew of cartoonish young critters, then puts them in simple settings. There's a lightness to Mouse's sandbox adventure with the little mice. Grumpy Mr. Turtle guards a complex, overgrown garden as he scolds frog. All is designed for fun, and the lesson is underneath. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal

K-Gr 2

The students in Miss Fox's class have been squabbling for days, so their teacher declares "Peace Week." The children decide that there will be no fighting or saying mean things, and that they will help others for an entire week. The rest of the book consists of various ways in which a child is tempted to engage in bad behavior but consistently chooses the high road instead. When Squirrel's sister complains about him bouncing nuts against the gate, he bounces marshmallows instead. When Bunny wears her yellow sweater and Polecat calls her "Bunny-Banana," she does not retaliate. In each case, the perpetrator of the mean remark or action is instantaneously and unrealistically reformed. Kennedy's watercolor, ink, and dye illustrations feature an endearing cast of animal characters with expressive faces. The book could generate some discussion about making positive choices; otherwise, it's an additional purchase.-Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ

Kirkus Reviews
Fed up with squabbling, Miss Fox declares a Peace Week. All week long, her students find themselves challenged by less-than-peaceful situations and succeed in turning the other cheek to every one, from bossy big sisters and bratty little kids to grumpy neighbors and obstreperous soccer fans. Each instance of peaceful behavior leads, miraculously, to a return in kind until they decide to "make every week Peace Week!" While there's no question that modeling peace-making is important, Miss Fox's students' experience is almost insultingly simplistic. Kids, even ones as young as the target audience, deserve a nuanced acknowledgment that peace-making can take time and can be complicated, hard work. Kennedy's bright line-and-color illustrations depict a multi-species classroom of endearingly childlike animals. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807563793
Publisher:
Whitman, Albert & Company
Publication date:
03/01/2009
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
570,712
Product dimensions:
7.90(w) x 10.20(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
AD480L (what's this?)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

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