Peace with Justice?: War Crimes and Accountability in the Former Yugoslavia

Peace with Justice?: War Crimes and Accountability in the Former Yugoslavia

by Paul R. Williams, Michael P. Scharf
     
 

Resolving the Yugoslav conflict was the last great foreign policy challenge of the twentieth century. Never before in history was so much emphasis placed on the need to employ the concept of justice in the peace process or was so much energy devoted to creating and utilizing international justice-based institutions. In this provocative and insightful book, two

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Overview

Resolving the Yugoslav conflict was the last great foreign policy challenge of the twentieth century. Never before in history was so much emphasis placed on the need to employ the concept of justice in the peace process or was so much energy devoted to creating and utilizing international justice-based institutions. In this provocative and insightful book, two former State Department lawyers, Paul R. Williams and Michael P. Scharf, undertake to tell the true story, "warts and all," of the role of justice in building peace in the former Yugoslavia. During the Yugoslav conflict, Serb leader Slobodan Milosevic was transformed from a key partner in peace to an indicted war criminal, who now sits in a 10 x 17 foot cell at the International Criminal Tribunal in The Hague. But the road from accommodation to accountability in the Balkans was anything but smooth. Based on their personal experience, extensive research, and interviews with key players in the Yugoslav peace-building process, Williams and Scharf provide a gripping account of how and why justice was misapplied and mishandled throughout the peace-builders' efforts to settle the Yugoslav conflict. All too often human rights and peace advocates treat justice as a panacea for conflict and atrocities, while self-proclaimed realists and professional diplomats dismiss justice as an impediment to peace. Williams and Scharf demonstrate that the truth lies in between. Their definitive study provides a novel framework for understanding the utility of justice as well as its practical limits as a diplomatic tool so that it can be more effectively applied in resolving future conflicts around the globe.

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Editorial Reviews

The Royal Intstitute Of International Affairs
A rich, complex and nuanced presentation of the various motivations and perceptions driving American and European policy on the violence and war crimes in the Balkans.
CHOICE
In 14 chapters with an extensive notes section, the authors not only examine in depth the carnage wrought by the conflict in Yugoslavia, but, more importantly, lay out the steps that they allege will bring about a lasting peace in this blighted portion of Europe. Recommended.
Slavonica
An interesting contribution relevant for scholars and policy-makers alike, as it provides a new perspective on the way the norms and institutions of justice worked, did not work, or could have worked better, in the Yugoslav peace-building process.
Slavic Review
In this book, Williams and Scharf shine a spotlight on some of the most egregious improprieties of a few of the worst offenders and demonstrate with agonizing clarity and in abundant detail what a high price was paid to bring an end to the fighting. Williams and Scharf describe the pusillanimity of all the major players. They illuminate how the international community and its strongest and seemingly most accountable actors time and again at crucial moments chose the low road of appeasement instead of the high road of justice and accountability.
European Foreign Affairs Review
A valuable contribution to the ongoing debate about how to manage the tensions between the competing values of truth, peace, compassion, and justice in the struggle for peace.
Seer
What is the relationship between peace and justice? Is one possible without the other? In this important new work, Paul R. Williams and Michael P. Scharf examine the norm of justice and the role it played in third-party efforts to bring an end to the Yugoslav wars of dissolution and build piece in the region. In an account of the conflict that is at once thorough and compelling, William and Scharf argue that justice and accountability took second place consistently to the accommodation of political and military leaders tolerant of, if not responsible for, the commission of war crimes. The consequence, they demonstrate, was appeasement that frequently had the effect of encouraging further violence and atrocities.
— Richard Caplan, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford
The Royal Institute Of International Affairs
A rich, complex and nuanced presentation of the various motivations and perceptions driving American and European policy on the violence and war crimes in the Balkans.
Choice
In 14 chapters with an extensive notes section, the authors not only examine in depth the carnage wrought by the conflict in Yugoslavia, but, more importantly, lay out the steps that they allege will bring about a lasting peace in this blighted portion of Europe. Recommended.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780742518551
Publisher:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
09/15/2002
Series:
The New International Relations of Europe Series
Pages:
352
Product dimensions:
5.94(w) x 9.28(h) x 1.00(d)

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Meet the Author

Paul R. Williams is the Rebecca Grazier Professor of Law and International Relations at American University, where he holds a joint appointment in the School of International Service and the Washington College of Law. Michael P. Scharf is professor of international law and director of the International War Crimes Research Office at Case Western Reserve University School of Law.

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