Peanut by Linas Alsenas, Linas Alsenas |, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Peanut

Peanut

5.0 3
by Linas Alsenas, Linas Alsenas
     
 

From the author/illustrator of MRS. CLAUS TAKES A VACATION, an utterly charming story of an old lady who makes an elephant her new pet dog.

When an old lady finds a small elephant in the park, what is she to do? Take him home and treat him like a pet dog, of course! Peanut's not like other dogs, though . . . and another walk in the park reveals that he's missing

Overview

From the author/illustrator of MRS. CLAUS TAKES A VACATION, an utterly charming story of an old lady who makes an elephant her new pet dog.

When an old lady finds a small elephant in the park, what is she to do? Take him home and treat him like a pet dog, of course! Peanut's not like other dogs, though . . . and another walk in the park reveals that he's missing from the circus. When Peanut returns home, the old lady is sad again, until she comes across a camel . . . who she decides is a cat!

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Leslie Rounds
Mildred, a very sad looking, lonely older woman, meets up with and decides to bring home a…puppy. The puppy, preschoolers will delight in discovering, is actually a baby elephant, also rather sad looking. Named Peanut because of his favorite food, the elephant does not do puppy things well; no fetching or rolling over. But Peanut is good at plant watering and cuddling on the couch and both baby elephant and Mildred look happy to be together. Sadly, Peanut is rediscovered by the circus that lost him and rejoins it—apparently a cheerful event for circus and elephant. The bereft Mildred sees that he is happy in his new life and then, fortunately, discovers a…kitten to take home. The kitten is actually a camel. What preschooler will not find that irony to be delicious? Exaggerated facial expressions on the characters help convey the emotions that may not be made obvious by the very brief, large print text. All illustrations are placed on bright white backgrounds, drawing further attention to the understated body language. This would make a nice story time selection for three and four year olds who will find it very funny.
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 1
A lonely old woman sits on a park bench looking miserable, until one day she finds "a stray . . . puppy." The colorful, ink-outlined illustrations show Mildred smiling as she watches a baby elephant rooting through an overturned garbage can. She decides to take him home and walks off leading him by his trunk. Because her new "puppy" will eat only one thing, she names him Peanut and the two settle into a comfortable friendship. Although Mildred realizes that her pet is different from other dogs, she still loves him dearly. When a man from the circus appears to reclaim him, she is again plunged into sadness, but after watching him perform, she is reassured that Peanut is happy to be home. Mildred returns to her lonely bench until a camel ambles by and she takes the "stray . . . kitten" home. The language is spare and simple, and much of the storytelling is done through the droll cartoon illustrations, which are set against white backdrops. Readers will be amused by Mildred's misconception about Peanut's identity, entertained by the elephant's un-doglike behavior, and charmed by the characters' affection for each other. This unpretentious yet moving story about loss, sadness, and joy makes a strong addition to storytimes about feelings and older people.
—Linda M. KentonCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
Mildred might want to make an appointment with her eye doctor. While on a visit to the park, she finds and adopts a lost "dog." It's an awfully strange dog, though: It has a long trunk, is gray all over and loves nuts. Mildred loves her new pet Peanut and is devastated when a visiting circus ringmaster claims the elephant as a member of his circus. Mildred goes to see the show and realizes Peanut is truly in his element, and she feels lonely until she sees a "kitty in the park." This begs to be read aloud to youngsters so they can get the jokes. Alsenas is able to tell a complete, humorous and touching story with an economy of words somewhat reminiscent of the Olivia series by Ian Falconer. The illustrations may seem a bit cartoonish, but they fit the tenor of the story. Droll it is. (Picture book. 3-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780439779807
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
08/01/2007
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.20(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
AD400L (what's this?)
Age Range:
3 - 5 Years

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