Pearl Harbor

Overview

Describes the military attack in Pearl Harbor by Japan on December 7, 1941, and when the United States entered World War II.

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Overview

Describes the military attack in Pearl Harbor by Japan on December 7, 1941, and when the United States entered World War II.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Most children in school today learn about Pearl Harbor and World War II. What they might not learn are the events and people involved in what lead up to this attack. These issues, persons and events are detailed in this title in the "We the People" series. This includes Japan's growing imperialism and drive for power in the Pacific, deteriorating relations between the United States and the Japanese Empire and the creation of the Axis powers. The attack itself is covered in enough detail to make clear the horror of the day. The moments before and directly after the attack are also detailed. The photographs are an important part of telling this story and these mostly black and whites have been chosen well. Also included are a timeline, glossary, important people and want-to-know-more lists and "Did You Know?" This is an excellent resource for any classroom study or library. 2005, Compass Point Books, Ages 7 to 12.
—Trina Heidt
School Library Journal
Gr 4-6-Each title presents an important historical event or place in a tightly written text accompanied by contemporary and period paintings, lithographs, and photographs. Erie Canal discusses the building and effects of this once-prosperous transportation system on the economy of 19th-century America. In Pearl Harbor, the author elaborates on the events leading up to the attack, the attack itself, and the building of the memorial. In Mount Vernon, Santella not only describes George Washington's love of his home, but also how he ran it as a plantation, and how he managed his slaves. In all three titles, the visual materials provide discerning readers with additional historical and social context. All three meet curriculum standards and are welcome additions to U.S. history collections.-Pamela K. Bomboy, Chesterfield County Public Schools, VA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

Meet the Author

Andrew Santella writes for magazines and newspapers, including GQ and the New York Times Book Review. He is the author of a number of books for young readers. He lives outside Chicago with his wife and son.

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