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Pearl Hart Arizona Bandit Female Stage Coach Robber
     

Pearl Hart Arizona Bandit Female Stage Coach Robber

by Cosmopolitan Magazine
 
Kindle version of vintage magazine article originally published in 1899. Contains lots of great info and illustrations seldom seen in the last 112 years.

Read excerpt -

"Joe Boot, the man who freighted his goods over to Globe with me, told me he had a mining-claim and offered to go out with me and try to dig up enough metal to get a passage home to

Overview

Kindle version of vintage magazine article originally published in 1899. Contains lots of great info and illustrations seldom seen in the last 112 years.

Read excerpt -

"Joe Boot, the man who freighted his goods over to Globe with me, told me he had a mining-claim and offered to go out with me and try to dig up enough metal to get a passage home to Canada. We went out to the claim and both worked night and day. It was useless. The claim was no good. I handled pick and shovel like a man, and began wearing man's clothes while I was mining there. I have never worked so hard in my life, and I have had some pretty hard experiences, too.

"When we found there wasn't a sign of color in the claim, I was frantic. I wanted to see my mother. It was the only wish I had. Boot sympathized with me, but he had no money and could not get any. He proposed that we rob the Globe stage. I protested. He said it was the only way to get money. Then I weakened so far as the moral part of it was concerned, but said I was afraid to rob a stage. It seemed a desperate undertaking for a woman of my size. Joe finally said it was easy enough and no one would get hurt. 'A bold front,' he said, 'is all that is necessary to rob any stage.'

"'Joe,' I said, `if you will promise me that no one will be hurt, I will go with you.'

"He promised, and we made our plans.

"On the afternoon of the robbery we took our horses and rode over the mountains and through the canons, and at last hit the Globe Road. We rode along slowly until we came to a bend in the road, which was a most favor-able spot for our undertaking. We halted and listened till we heard the stage. Then we went forward on a slow walk, till we saw the stage coming around the bend. We then pulled to one side of the road. Joe drew a 'forty-five,' and said, 'Throw up your hands!' I drew my little thirty-eight' and likewise covered the occupants' of the stage. Joe said to me, ‘Get off your horse.' I did so, while he kept the people covered. He ordered them out of the stage. They were a badly scared outfit. I learned how easily a job of this kind could be done.

"Joe told me to search the passengers for arms. I carefully went through them all. They had no pistols. Joe motioned toward the stage. I advanced and searched it, and found the—brave passengers had left two of their guns behind them when ordered out of the stage. Really, I can't see why men carry revolvers, because they almost invariably give them up at the very time they were made to be used. They certainly don't want revolvers for playthings. I gave Joe a 'forty-four,' and kept the 'forty-five' for myself. Joe told me to search the passengers for money. I did so, and found on the fellow who was shaking the worst three hundred and ninety dollars. This fellow was trembling so I could hardly get my hand in his pockets. The other fellow, a sort of a dude, with his hair parted in the middle, tried to tell me how much he needed the money, but he yielded thirty-six dollars, a dime and two nickels. Then I searched the remaining passenger, a Chinaman He was nearer my size and I just scared him to death. His clothes enabled me to go through him quickly. I only got five dollars, however.

"The stage-driver had a few dollars, but after a council of war we decided not to rob him. Then we gave each of the others a charitable contribution of a dollar apiece and ordered them to move on, Joe warning them all not to look back as they valued their lives.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940015878752
Publisher:
history-bytes
Publication date:
10/24/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
168 KB

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