Pearl's New Skates

Pearl's New Skates

by Holly Keller
     
 

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Pearl has new skates.
They are real skates
(not double runners),
and she can't wait to try them.

Pearl inches out onto the frozen pond.
But instead of twirling,
she topples.
Instead of spinning,
she falls -- splaaat!

Pearl has new skates.
They are shiny white with red tassels,
and she loves them.

Will Pearl ever skate in

Overview

Pearl has new skates.
They are real skates
(not double runners),
and she can't wait to try them.

Pearl inches out onto the frozen pond.
But instead of twirling,
she topples.
Instead of spinning,
she falls -- splaaat!

Pearl has new skates.
They are shiny white with red tassels,
and she loves them.

Will Pearl ever skate in real life the way she skates in her dreams?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
In this cunning caper, Keller (Farfallina & Marcel) introduces a humorously headstrong young rabbit who receives a pair of ice skates for her birthday. "They're real ones... not double runners," Pearl proudly announces to her grandmother on the phone. Grandma makes her a red skating skirt, in which a barefoot Pearl "twirl[s] on her toes and jump[s] in the air," imagining she is "gliding backward and forward, like a ballerina on the ice." Keller uses these spot illustrations to win readers over to Pearl's charms. So when Pearl heads to the frozen pond, looks with disdain at her friend's double runners and shrugs off her uncle's offer to give her a hand on the ice ("I don't need any help"), youngsters will recognize her bravery as mere veneer. They will surely giggle at Pearl's panicked expression as she tumbles onto the ice, unable to stand up on her skates. Her shrewd uncle mentions that he likes to skate early in the morning, before anyone else arrives, and invites Pearl to come along; "I might not stay very long," she replies. But with the patient fellow's encouragement-and some practice on her part-Pearl learns to glide on the ice. Rendered in watercolors and black line, Keller's spry, spare illustrations follow the heroine's transformation from haughty to humble, comically chronicled in her changeable facial expressions. (The heroine also reconciles with her double-runner pal.) A useful message, clearly and cleverly delivered. Ages 4-up. (Jan.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
K-Gr 2-Pearl can't wait to try out her new birthday skates, but she slips and topples head over heels every time she attempts to stand up on them. At first, the young rabbit wants to give up. However, after a bit of gentle encouragement from Uncle Jack and through her own persistence, she eventually achieves success. Attractive pastel watercolors show an exuberant Pearl as she dreams of twirling on the ice, yet, a few pages later, readers find a shocked bunny who has fallen flat on her face. Using simple lines, Keller manages to give her characters a great deal of expression. Youngsters will empathize with Pearl's initial disappointment and rejoice in her eventual success. Pair this book with Katharine Holabird's Angelina Ice Skates (Pleasant Co., 2001) for a skating-themed storytime.-Blair Christolon, Prince William Public Library System, Manassas, VA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Keller's tale of Pearl's struggles to master the slippery sport of ice skating has at its core a powerful message about perseverance. When Pearl receives a pair of big-girl, single-runner ice skates for her birthday, she's immediately transported by fantasies of effortlessly skimming the ice. When Pearl returns to reality with a thump-on her bottom at the skating pond-she is disenchanted, ready to walk away from the ice forever. With some gentle instructions from her uncle, Pearl learns that while practice might not make perfect, it certainly helps you get up and going on your new skates. Keller is on target with Pearl's frustration when her fantasy fails to match her reality, and young readers, who daily face their own set of new skills to master, will take heart with Pearl's ultimate accomplishment. Keller's bright watercolor illustrations comically capture Pearl's moods and mortification. She artfully expresses Pearl's total disdain, from the defiant tilt of a chin to the empathically splayed hands. Keller's tale is a wonderful antidote to discouragement and is bound to bolster any new athlete's faltering self-esteem. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060562809
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
12/28/2004
Pages:
24
Product dimensions:
11.00(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.25(d)
Age Range:
3 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Holly Keller is the creator of many popular books for children, including the Horace books, Farfallina & Marcel, and Help! In applauding her work, School Library Journal noted that she is "an author/artist who truly understands children." Holly Keller lives in New Haven, Connecticut.

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