Peat And Its Products

Overview

Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.
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Overview

Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781443744119
  • Publisher: Tomlin Press
  • Publication date: 10/7/2008
  • Pages: 380
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.85 (d)

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER II. PEAT AS AN ARTICLE OF FUEL. Except in the form of air-dried turves, peat as an article of fuel is comparatively little known in the United Kingdom. Though many bodies not contained in coal are found in peat the elements of the two are the same. In physical appearance coal, wood, and peat are closely allied, all three being mainly composed of ligneous fibre, a compound of the four elements carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen. Coal and peat, though differing in some particulars, are both produced by the decomposition of species of organic growth. Professor Emmons, writing on the important subject, remarks " There is one consideration which commends itself to the philanthropic of all our large cities, viz., the introduction of peat as a fuel to supply the necessities of the poor. It is believed that much suffering may be prevented and much comfort promoted by the use of peat in all places where fuel is expensive. We have in this homely substance of peat an invaluable article of which prejudice alone can prevent a general use." We have not experienced the bitterness of a coal famine such as lately existed in the Eastern and middle States of America, when numbers died from lack of fuel, works were closed, coal trains held up and looted, and every substitute for coal improvised, leaves and stalks of plants, saw-dust, wool, oil, and even corn being requisitioned. So desperate was the situation, and so sore the famine, that at one time it was seriously suggested that the residual products of theentire grain crop, including corn, wheat, oats, barley, and rye, should be chemically treated and compressed, by which means it was calculated that about 200,000,000 tons ofartificial fuel could be yearly grown and manufactured. When properly treated, scientists asserted that...
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