Pedagogy, Intellectuals, and Dissent in the Later Middle Ages: Lollardy and Ideas of Learning

Overview

Copeland's detailed examination of the relationship between heretical and conventional attitudes to learning focuses on the role of intellectual individuals in the medieval heresy of Lollardy. The first part of the study includes a discussion of the theological and intellectual debate surrounding the literal reading of texts and traces the origins of the debate back to antiquity. The second part discusses prison writing, particularly by Richard Wyche and William Thorpe, and includes extensive extracts. Latin ...
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Overview

Copeland's detailed examination of the relationship between heretical and conventional attitudes to learning focuses on the role of intellectual individuals in the medieval heresy of Lollardy. The first part of the study includes a discussion of the theological and intellectual debate surrounding the literal reading of texts and traces the origins of the debate back to antiquity. The second part discusses prison writing, particularly by Richard Wyche and William Thorpe, and includes extensive extracts. Latin texts are accompanied by English translation.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Rita Copeland's dense, complex, and ambitious book has a double agenda.... Pedagogy, Intellectuals, and Dissent in the Later Middle Ages is a demanding and challenging book, which reads more like a series of discrete studies than an overall thesis." Albion

"Copeland's arguments here are erudite, provocative, and challenging, and her primary sources are meticulously selected...Pedagogy, Intellectuals, and Dissent in the Later Middle Ages...is tightly focused, and the range and ambition of its scope go far beyond what might be inferred from the book's slim binding...In her depiction of Lollardy's hermeneutical leap from the academy to the public, she presents modern scholars with a formidable (but rather thrilling) benchmark for the vigor and effect of our teaching. This added element leads me to suggest that [this book] deserves the attention of not only medievalists, but scholars of other periods as well." Comitatus

"Intellectual history at its best." Arthuriana

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Rita Copeland is Professor of Classical Studies and Comparative Literature at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments; General introduction: pedagogy and intellectuals; Part I. From Pedagogies to Hermeneutics: Childhood, the Literal Sense and the Heretical Classroom: Introduction; 1. Revaluating the literal sense from antiquity to the Middle Ages; 2. Lollardy and the politics of the literal sense; Part II. Violent Representations: Intellectuals and Prison Writing: Introduction; 3. Richard Wyche and the public record; 4. William Thorpe and the historical record; Bibliography; Index.

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