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Pedro and Me: Friendship, Loss, and What I Learned (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)
     

Pedro and Me: Friendship, Loss, and What I Learned (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

5.0 7
by Judd Winick
 

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FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY. A touching tribute, in graphic comic-book style, to the friendship shared by cartoonist Judd Winick and Pedro Zamora of MTV's Real World. The book explores the friendship of these very different friends and the legac

Overview

FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY. A touching tribute, in graphic comic-book style, to the friendship shared by cartoonist Judd Winick and Pedro Zamora of MTV's Real World. The book explores the friendship of these very different friends and the legac

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble, Inc.
It's presented as a graphic novel and possesses the drama and intensity of powerful fiction, but the story that Pedro & Me tells is real. This cartoonist's memoir of his friend Pedro Zamora portrays a man who transformed his disability into a banner for those who shared his affliction. One Real World San Francisco, Judd Winick befriended Zamora, an HIV positive AIDS activist, whose illness and transcendence were chronicled by that show. A Touching and compelling tribute to a heroic man.
Big Picture Review
A narrative of dignity and extraordinary accessibility . . . Zamora would be proud.
— (Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books)
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In this powerful and captivating graphic novel, Winick, a professional cartoonist and cast member of MTV's The Real World 3: San Francisco, pays tribute to his Real World housemate and friend Pedro Zamora, an AIDS activist and educator who died of the disease in 1994. Striking just the right balance of cool and forthrightness sure to attract a broad cross section of teens, twenty-somethings and beyond, Winick describes the special bond he developed with Zamora and shares some of his own journey to enlightenment about AIDS awareness. From Winick's initial preconceptions about the disease to the ultimate moments of heartbreaking loss, the author bravely invites readers into a life-altering experience. The result is never mawkish: Winick speaks of his friend not with otherworldly awe, but with palpable love and warmth and profound admiration. Readers unfamiliar with the graphic novel genre would do well to start with this title. Winick imbues deceptively simple black-and-white comic-strip art with a full spectrum of emotion, and his approach is particularly adept at conveying Zamora's mind-set; for instance, a series of partial views of Zamora driving, just after he's received the news that he's HIV positive, communicates Zamora's anxiety and confusion. Throughout, Winick depicts Zamora as a vital force, a tireless teacher using frank language to relate facts about how people contract the virus that causes AIDS, how they can prevent it and how they can live with it. An innovative and accessible approach to a difficult subject. Ages 14-up. (Sept.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
KLIATT
Judd Winick's graphic book about his friendship with Pedro Zamora is one of the best books that I have read in a long time. It is the story of two men who meet and develop a close friendship during the filming of one of MTV's Real World series. In fact some of you or your readers may remember Pedro from this show. He was the young gay man who, shortly after the filming ended, died from complications brought on by AIDS. He was only 22 when he died and yet, as Winick's book shows, his life touched thousands of people. Diagnosed while in high school, Pedro decided to give meaning and direction to his life by educating others about the disease and how to prevent it. Starting with his own classmates, he set out to save others from his fate. Along the way, seeing that television would increase the audience that he could reach, Pedro agreed to appear on Real World. He and Winick met when they were designated roommates. Winick is honest in his self-portrait as a liberal who was afraid of rooming with someone with AIDS. He chided himself about his fears, seeing in them hypocrisy. But Pedro, by weeding out the facts from the misconceptions about the disease, allayed Winick's concerns. Winick's book is straightforward in its depiction of what HIV and AIDS can do to its victims. His transcription of one of Pedro's talks provides the reader with a lesson on how to prevent AIDS and makes this book a useful resource for teaching students about the disease. Its simple language and illustrations also makes this an ideal choice for reluctant readers. It is a sad story, beautifully written in clear and concise language. This work is suitable for middle and high school-age adolescents. KLIATT Codes:JS*—Exceptional book, recommended for junior and senior high school students. 2000, Henry Holt, 187p, illus, 24cm, 99-40729, $15.00. Ages 13 to 18. Reviewer: Debra Mitts Smith; YA Libn., Glenview P.L., Glenview, IL January 2001 (Vol. 35 No. 1)
Children's Literature
This unique book presents the powerful relationship between the author and Pedro Zamora, the HIV-positive, AIDS educator who appeared on MTV's The Real World San Francisco. The two men were roommates on the show. Not only did Pedro teach Judd about courage and friendship, but he also taught millions of television viewers about being gay and living with AIDS. This special book pays a lovely, genuine tribute to an inspiring young man whose efforts to educate young people about the dangers of unsafe sex now continues after his death. Winick is a talented cartoonist and writer, who combines his abilities with a great story in this book. 2000, Henry Holt, $15.00. Ages 10 up. Reviewer: Rebecca Joseph
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up-In graphic-novel format, Winick addresses the moral depth of friendship, the molding processes of family, the attention required to discern and pursue a vocation, HIV education, acceptance of gay-identifying youth by themselves and by their families, and the role of death in the human life cycle. The author does a stellar job of marrying image to word to form a flowing narrative. He introduces readers to his own formation as a cartoonist wanna-be, and how he landed a role in MTV's The Real World series in order to live rent-free in San Francisco for six months. Among his television producer-selected roommates was Pedro Zamora, a Cuban immigrant who developed HIV as a teenager. Pedro's response to his diagnosis was to become an HIV educator, traveling around the nation to give informed and inspirational speeches in venues that included schools. Zamora and Winick became close friends after the author's initial trepidation about sharing living space with a gay man infected with the AIDS virus. The role of another of their roommates, a female Asian-American medical student, both in Winick's education and his personal life, is nicely folded into his account. The story continues through Zamora's decline and death to the periods of grieving and grief recovery that followed for Winick, Zamora's family, and his many friends. This is an important book for teens and the adults who care about them. Winick handles his topics with both sensitivity and a thoroughness that rarely coexist so seamlessly.-Francisca Goldsmith, Berkeley Public Library, CA Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Cartoonist Winick paints an emotional, graceful portrait of the life of Pedro Zamora, his roommate on the forerunner to today's realityTV craze, MTV's The Real World. When the seven castmembers first met in San Francisco in early 1994, they knew one of them was HIVpositive, but not which one. Winick soon discovered that it was his chosen roommate, openly gay, Cubanborn Pedro. Wasting little time here on his own initial concerns, Winick delves into some subtle, very effective mythbashing regarding AIDS and HIV, mostly through the straightforward, ebullient words of Pedro, who was diagnosed when he was 17 and started working as an AIDS educator soon after. Winick leavens the chronicle of Pedro's illness with his romance with—and subsequent onair marriage to—Sean, Winick's own blossoming love for a fellow castmember, funny injections of camp (" ‘How was I going to say it without saying it?' . . . ‘I could really go for some fruit. Speaking of fruit . . .' "), and a taste of the behindthescenes angst of living life in front of a TV audience for six months. The depiction of Pedro's spiral toward death, at the age of 22, is difficult, but ultimately uplifting, to read. The format—a memoir in the form of a graphic novel—is enticing, with images that are effusive and alive on the page and dialogue bubbles full of language spoken in unsparing terms and teaching some urgent lessons. Engrossing, wise, and impossibly brave. (Nonfiction. 12+)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780613315746
Publisher:
Turtleback Books
Publication date:
03/28/2009
Edition description:
THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY
Pages:
187
Product dimensions:
6.25(w) x 9.50(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
14 - 17 Years

Read an Excerpt




Chapter One


THE SHUTTLE GUY


OCTOBER 12, 1994. IT WAS FOUR MONTHS AFTER WE FINISHED FILMING THE SHOW AND LEFT THE HOUSE, AND THREE MONTHS AFTER PEDRO WAS FIRST HOSPITALIZED. I WAS LEAVING L.A. TO GO SEE HIM IN MIAMI. THE AIRPORT SHUTTLES DRIVER SHOWED UP AT MY APARTMENT AND HE WAS, WELL, REMARKABLE.


    "I BELIEVE WE HAVE A RENDEZVOUS."


HE WAS SO REFINED, SO PROPER, AS IF HE DROVE A HORSE AND CARRIAGE.


    "WATCH YOUR HEAD AND PLEASE MAKE YOURSELF COMFORTABLE."

    "THANKS."

    "SO WHERE DO YOUR TRAVELS TAKE YOU?"

    "MIAMI."

    "MIAMI! AN EXUBERANT PLACE. WHAT TAKES YOU THERE? BUSINESS OR PLEASURE?"

    "WELL, NEITHER."

    "I'M VISITING A SICK FRIEND."

    "OH. I AM VERY SORRY TO HEAR THAT."

    "YOU KNOW ... YOU'RE CARRYING A LOT OF DARKNESS AROUND YOU."

    "SORRY?"

    "DARKNESS. YOU'RE CARRYING IT ALL AROUND YOU ..."

    "THAT'S NOT WHY YOU'RE GOING TO SEE YOUR FRIEND."

    "YOU'RE THERE TO BRING IN THE LIGHT."

    "YOU'RE THERE TO BRING THEM UP."

    "OKAY? UP!"

    "Y'HEAR?"

    "I HEAR YA."

    "UP."

    "GOOD!"

    "'CAUSE Y'KNOW ..."

    "YOU GOT TO GIVE BACK WHATYOU'VE BEEN GIVEN, MY FRIEND."

Meet the Author

Judd Winick has been cartooning professionally since age 16. He illustrated the Complete Idiot's Guide series, and wrote and illustrated the series Road Trip, which was nominated for an Eisner Award (comics' highest honor). Judd Winick lives in San Francisco with former Real World housemate, now life partner, Pam Ling.

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Pedro and Me: Friendship, Loss, and What I Learned 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Book that I read Pedro and Me. Is about a guy who has AIDS HIV Positive and how he tries to fight it. I think I would recommend this book to people because it has information on how you could learn more about AIDS. It is also about friendship and caring. In this book Pedro has so many people that care for, For example when he was at the hospital his friends were there to comfort him this means they actually did care for him. The good thing about the book it is made cartoons, so actually more people can enjoy reading it even more. I definitely agree that you will laugh and cry because it is such a beautiful and touching story. I have never before read a book with such emotions, and such intensity. I actually enjoyed reading this book
Guest More than 1 year ago
Pedro and Me Pedro and Me is a really good and teachable book. Judd Winnick wants to let you know his message throughout this book. In this book the most important subject he wants you to know is that no matter what you are or what you have, people will be there for you at all times. Also, he tries to change the lives of others by giving the reader lessons on AIDS throughout his friend Pedro. Who through the series of the Real World Pedro gave lessons on what he was experiencing with HIV positive. This book really teaches you something. I really suggest you if you are interested on being taught by a book by a real experience.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In the book Pedro & Me there are mostly two characters they are Judd and Pedro. Pedro is a person who is HIV positive and both Judd and Pedro auditioned to be in the ¿Real World¿. When Judd found out he was going to be living with a person who is HIV positive he freaked out. Their friendship grows and Judd helps Pedro to move on with his support. This is a really interesting book because it shows a lot of values in life and how to deal with difficult situations.
Guest More than 1 year ago
When I read this book, I hadn't seen the Real World San Fran at all. I had heard about it and seen a reunion with Judd and the other housemates. I heard of the book, and I picked it up, and I couldn't stop reading it until it was done. I definetly agree that you will laugh and cry because it is such a beautiful and touching story. I have never before read a book with such emotions, and such intensity. Even though I hadn't known him, I do feel like I lost a friend after reading that book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I didn't see the Real World - San Francisco - until late 2000. Almost coincidentally I found out that Pedro Zamora had died, but that Judd Winick had just finished a book about their friendship. I bought it and read it in one setting - just could not put it down. It does a great job of both educating about safe sex, hiv and aids as well as filling in alot of what you didn't see on the Real World episodes. I guarantee you will laugh and cry.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an amazing tale of two people, their friendship and their lives. Judd Winick does an incredible job of letting the reader feel what he felt. I remember the Real World with Pedro and Judd. I remember when Pedro died and feeling like I had lost a friend. I had the exact same feeling reading this book. The world was better because of Pedro Zamora and reading this book reinforces why.