A Penguin Pup for Pinkerton

A Penguin Pup for Pinkerton

by Steven Kellogg
     
 

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When Emily comes home from school and tells her family what she has learned about penguin parents and their babies, Pinkerton is inspired and starts dreaming of raising a penguin pup of his own. In his desperation to become a father, Pinkerton mistakes a football for a penguin egg and winds up tossing an entire football team into one big pileup. Luckily, Emily's… See more details below

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Overview


When Emily comes home from school and tells her family what she has learned about penguin parents and their babies, Pinkerton is inspired and starts dreaming of raising a penguin pup of his own. In his desperation to become a father, Pinkerton mistakes a football for a penguin egg and winds up tossing an entire football team into one big pileup. Luckily, Emily's Granny arrives in time to save the day, in this typically hilarious adventure starring everyone's favorite irrepressible Great Dane.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Steven Kellogg's irrepressible pooch returns in A Penguin Pup for Pinkerton. This time around, Pinkerton mistakes a football for a penguin egg when his owner, Emily, reports all she's learned about the animals and their young. But chaos follows when Pinkerton loses track of his baby. (Sept.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
Pinkerton is a very large Great Dane pup. One day, Emily, a member of Pinkerton's family, comes home from school and tells the whole family about what she learned in school that day. It seems that her class is studying Penguins. Everything about Penguins, and as she relates her newly found knowledge, Pinkerton is all ears. He especially likes the part about Penguins laying eggs and imagines himself a Penguin parent. He adopts the family football as his egg and Emily presents him to her class in his adoptive parent mode. A classmate recognizes the football as one that was stolen from a game yesterday. When the football is taken from him, Pinkerton is inconsolable. On the way home from school, Pinkerton spies another football game in progress and proceeds to steal their ball, leaving everyone in an uproar. He runs off with the football and is later found at the ice skating rink (Antarctica). He refuses to give up the ball until Granny saves the day by substituting a stuffed animal inside a cloth bag. Pinkerton is pacified. The illustrations add to the silliness. 2001, Dial Books, $15.99. Ages 4 to 7. Reviewer: Meredith Kiger
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-Pinkerton's back-and his new adventures are as outrageous and entertaining as ever. The story starts on the title page, as the oversized pup sneaks off with an unattended football. When his owner, Emily, comes home from school full of enthusiasm and information about their latest topic of study (penguins and their remarkable parenting skills), the Great Dane promptly decides the football must be an egg. When the girl decides to take him and his "egg" to school for show-and-tell, pandemonium ensues. An irate Billy gets his ball back by using a cookie as a bribe. Then on the way home, the dog just happens to find another football (it's in use at the time) and leads football players and spectators on a merry chase through a nearby dog show. He winds up at the empty ice rink, cradling his new penguin egg. Luckily, Granny has made a penguin egg (complete with zipper) and both Pinkerton and Emily are pleased as punch with the baby "Pinkwin" it contains. Kellogg's cheerful, busy artwork offers plenty of extra laughs, from Rose the cat's unsentimental musings (she sees the penguins- and most other animals, including Pinkerton-as potential cat food) to the outraged faces of the people and pets whose lives are complicated by the pup's headlong dash. An engaging story, humorous illustrations, amusing details, and a combination of perennially popular topics make this a sure winner.-Lisa Dennis, The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, PA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
The latest Pinkerton from Kellogg is a bit too all over the place to sustain an actual story line, and Pinkerton is too distracted to play even a fantasy role of a father. Emily learns in school that father Emperor penguins cradle their chick's egg on their feet through nine long weeks to keep them warm. Pinkerton, a Great Dane dreaming of his own flock of penguins, decides he is going to cradle a white football he has found. This he does until a dog biscuit distracts him, allowing the owner of the football to reclaim his equipment. As Pinkerton is being led home through the park, he spies another football and kidnaps it, busting through a dog show for good measure. He is located at the neighborhood ice rink, where he is sitting patiently for the football to hatch. A quick substitution by Granny (whose been sewing stuffed animals throughout the story) insures the return of the football and a successful hatching for Pinkerton. As an agent of mayhem, Pinkerton has no equal, and preposterous stories can be good fun, but this one just never gets on track: Pinkerton is too self-involved for the idea of fatherhood to seem appealing to him. Still, this gives Kellogg a chance to showcase his wonderfully busy, magnetic artwork. It keeps everything humming along on the visual plane so much so that there's no need for a real story to back it up. (Picture book. 4-7)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780142501702
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date:
12/01/2003
Series:
Picture Puffin Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.56(w) x 10.54(h) x 0.10(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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