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Pennine Way: British Walking Guide: planning, places to stay, places to eat; includes 138 large-scale walking maps
     

Pennine Way: British Walking Guide: planning, places to stay, places to eat; includes 138 large-scale walking maps

by Keith Carter, Chris Scott, Stuart Greig
 

Britain's best-known National Trail winds for 256 miles through three National Parks – the Peak District, Yorkshire Dales and Northumberland. This superb footpath showcases Britain's finest upland scenery, while touching the literary landscape of the Bronte family and Roman history along Hadrian's Wall. 138 large-scale walking maps – at just under 1:

Overview

Britain's best-known National Trail winds for 256 miles through three National Parks – the Peak District, Yorkshire Dales and Northumberland. This superb footpath showcases Britain's finest upland scenery, while touching the literary landscape of the Bronte family and Roman history along Hadrian's Wall. 138 large-scale walking maps – at just under 1:20,000 – showing route times, gradients, where to stay, interesting features. Guides to 57 towns and villages – along the way Itineraries for all walkers – whether walking the route in its entirety or sampling the highlights on day walks and short breaks. Practical information for all budgets – Edale to Kirk Yetholm: where to stay (B&Bs, hostels, campsites, pubs and hotels), where to eat, what to see, plus detailed town plans Public transport information – all access points on the path. GPS waypoints. These are also downloadable from the Trailblazer website. Now includes extra color sections: 16pp color introduction and 16pp of color mapping for stage sections (one stage per page) with trail profiles.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
'The maps which are hand written on a scale of 1: 20000 are top class'
- The Pennine Way Association, October 2011'An excellent book'
- Backpack, Autumn 2011'Recommended guide'
- Walk, the magazine of the Ramblers, June 2010 'The Trailblazer series stands head, shoulders, waist and ankles above the rest. They are particularly strong on mapping...' The Sunday Times (UK)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781905864614
Publisher:
Trailblazer Publications
Publication date:
01/07/2015
Edition description:
Fourth Edition
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
4.70(w) x 7.00(h) x 0.60(d)

Read an Excerpt

Of all the long-distance trails in the British Isles the Pennine Way, 256 miles/412km (268 miles/429km including optional side routes) along the backbone of northern England, is pre-eminent. The first to 
be opened as a National Trail, to some it's the best; it's certainly the best known and it's arguably the hardest. Anyone who completes the Pennine Way will refute the suggestion that it was easy. It isn't. It requires fitness, determination, 
good humour and adaptability because your walk won't go smoothly all the time. There will be days when you wish you'd never crawled out of bed, but there will be others when you feel invincible, when 
you can walk all day and arrive at your next stop, raring to go.
The Way takes you through most of the inland habitats of flora 
and fauna in this country and you'll see a wonderful variety of plant 
and animal life. You'll start with a testing trudge over the peat moors 
of the Peak District and continue into the South Pennines past such 
milestones as Stoodley Pike and Calder Vale. You then move into 
Brontë country and will pass Top Withins, said to be the Wuthering 
Heights of Emily's novel.
Your path continues past reservoirs and windswept moorland 
until Lothersdale, the last former mill town, now a village with an 
incongruous factory chimney. The bedrock now turns to limestone and 
you enter the lowlands of the Airedale Gap where a delightful riverside 
walk leads to Malham. The climbing resumes, up onto Fountains Fell 
and Pen-y-ghent and then down into Horton-in-Ribblesdale in Three 
Peaks country, a land of wide skies and magnificent views. Through 
Swaledale the Way continues, where Hawes and Keld lead to lonely 
and deserted Baldersdale: the halfway point.
Passing Teesdale's churning waterfalls, the Way then breaches the 
North Pennines to behold the stunning glaciated chasm of High Cup 
and thereafter the homely village of Dufton. Here begins the much- 
dreaded traverse of Cross Fell, at 2930ft/893m the walk's highest 
point. Gradually descending from the wilds of the North Pennines 
you reach Hadrian's Wall, archaeologically and historically one of 
the most evocative places in Britain. Along with High Cup, the walk 
along the Wall is one of the most outstanding days on the trail. North of the Wall you enter the vast forests of Wark and Redesdale, 
eventually reaching the village of Bellingham. One more day to the 
lonely forest outpost of Byrness is followed by the suitably climactic 
27-mile (43km) slog over the Cheviots to the end at Kirk Yetholm.An unexpected bonus of the walk, particularly for city-based walkers, is 
the pleasing time-warp effect evoked in some villages; Garrigill being a good 
example. Here you'll enjoy a kind of Blytonesque rural British apogee: the 
tranquil village green with the village shop overlooking it and a church.For some the walk changes their lives. Certainly completing the Way proves 
there's nothing you can't do once you set your mind to it and, however you do 
it, the Pennine Way stands supreme. 


Meet the Author

Keith Carter has over 40 years' experience of hiking Britain's long-distance paths with numerous magazine articles published on the subject.

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