People Like Us

People Like Us

4.3 6
by Dominick Dunne
     
 

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Before they had Too Much Money, the inhabitants of Dominick Dunne’s glitzy, gossipy New York Times bestselling novels were People Like Us.

The way journalist Gus Bailey tells it, old money is always preferred, but occasionally new money sneaks in–even where it is most unwelcome. After moving from Cincinnati, Elias and Ruby Renthal strike

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Overview

Before they had Too Much Money, the inhabitants of Dominick Dunne’s glitzy, gossipy New York Times bestselling novels were People Like Us.

The way journalist Gus Bailey tells it, old money is always preferred, but occasionally new money sneaks in–even where it is most unwelcome. After moving from Cincinnati, Elias and Ruby Renthal strike it even richer in New York, turning their millions into billions. It would be impolite for high society to refuse them now. Not to mention disadvantageous. As long as the market is strong, there’s absolutely nothing to worry about–except for those nasty secrets from the past. Scandal, anyone?

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“A masterly popular novel . . . by a man who knows–along with F. Scott Fitzgerald–that the rich are very different. And wonderfully fascinating.”—Kirkus Reviews

“Dead-on-target.”—New York Times Book Review

“Spicy.”—Los Angeles Times

“Wickedly sharp.”—Philadelphia Inquirer

Kit Reed
The dialogue is funny and dead-on target, as Dominick Dunne makes it clear that Americans are not as democratic as they pretend...Engaging us in his characters' concerns and then pulling multiple story strands into a tight knot, Dominick Dunne demonstrates with wit and accuracy the delicate, merciless distinction between ''people like that'' and ''people like us.'' -- New York Times
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
First, forget that this is a roman a clef: it might give additional thrills to New Yorkers and subjects of Liz Smith and Suzy's society columns, but Dunne's novel is entirely enjoyable if one has never heard of, let alone dined at, Mortimer's. People Like Us opens with the entrance into Clarence's, a smart New York restaurant, of Gus Bailey and Ruby Renthal. Gus has recently been released from prison, and Ruby is rarely seen in society anymore. Then the author swoops back in time to begin chronicling a dizzying round of parties and gossip and gossip and parties. This is a world whose bible is the Social Register and where lavish gifts to the Metropolitan Opera can procure entree to the chintz-bedecked drawing-rooms of families who are as snobbish as any described by Edith Wharton. Dunne (The Two Mrs. Grenvilles) has created Gus Bailey, one of the few decent characters here, in his own image. The last scene in the book is a reprise of the first, but by this time we know that Gus served time for shooting the killer of his daughter and that Ruby has been ostracized by New York society because her husband was jailed for financial offenses. The point is that Gus and Ruby don't care anymore about whether they get a good table at Clarence's. People Like Us is witty, wise, compassionate, and a darn good read. (June)
Library Journal
Best-selling author ( The Two Mrs. Grenvilles , 1985) and Vanity Fair contributor Dunne presents a contemporary comedy of manners (really a satirical ``tragedy of morals'') that examines the values of Manhattan's old families and ``nouveau riche'' alike. Juxtaposed against the problems of opulent ``Social Register'' types at the ``best'' parties are basic issues with far-reaching consequences, often escaping the understanding of these inbred members of high society. When disasters touch those at the top, their lives must be reshaped, enabling some to restructure their existences more realistically. Discerning readers will find much to ponder within sublevels of this entertaining story. Highly recommended. Ellen R. Cohen, Rockville, Md.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780345521040
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
10/06/2009
Pages:
416
Sales rank:
393,577
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.90(d)

Meet the Author

Dominick Dunne is the author of five bestselling novels, two collections of essays, and, most recently, The Way We Lived Then, a memoir with photographs. He is Special Correspondent for Vanity Fair and lives in New York City and Hadlyme, Connecticut.

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