People of the Black Sun: A People of the Longhouse Novel

( 14 )

Overview

A novel of North America?s Forgotten Past

 

The epic tale that began in The People of the Longhouse draws to a close in People of the Black Sun, the final installation of the Iroquois quartet by bestselling authors and archaeologists Kathleen O?Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear.

The darkness that Dekanawida has envisioned is drawing closer, and the warring Iroquois nations have refused to listen to his message of peace and compassion. Consumed...

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People of the Black Sun: A People of the Longhouse Novel

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Overview

A novel of North America’s Forgotten Past

 

The epic tale that began in The People of the Longhouse draws to a close in People of the Black Sun, the final installation of the Iroquois quartet by bestselling authors and archaeologists Kathleen O’Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear.

The darkness that Dekanawida has envisioned is drawing closer, and the warring Iroquois nations have refused to listen to his message of peace and compassion. Consumed by madness, Chief Atotarho is determined to subjugate all five nations—beginning with Dekanawida’s own people, the Standing Stone nation.  All who stand in his way will be destroyed.

It is on the field of battle that Dekanawida is given his first real advantage in his quest for peace.  A great storm appears to answer his call, scattering Atotarho’s forces when they are on the verge of annihilating the Standing Stone People. 

Now elevated to the status of Prophet, Dekanawida must call on the aid of old friends Baji and Hiyawento to convince the hostile neighboring clans that the destruction of one nation will mean the end of them all.  Can their mission of peace succeed in time to save everyone that they love, or will their world be consumed by darkness?

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"A well-crafted chapter in the Gears’s ongoing series."

Kirkus Reviews on People of the Black Sun

"Sure to keep readers turning the pages… As usual, the Gears, husband-and-wife archaeologists, have enriched and enhanced the gripping plot with plenty of anthropological, archaeological, and historical detail."

Booklist on The Dawn Country

Kirkus Reviews
The conclusion of the four-novel People of the Longhouse saga, part of the Gears' long-running series of novels featuring ancient Native American peoples. The Gears (The Broken Land, 2012, etc.), both archaeologists, once again show the depth of their research in their adventure series, suffusing the narrative with details of the prehistory Iroquois people in an area that now encompasses parts of New York, Vermont, New Hampshire and Ontario. In this installment, they finish their story of Dekanawida the Peacemaker, which began with 2010's People of the Longhouse. Dekanawida--formerly known as the warrior Odion, also known as the Sky Messenger--is a prophet who has helped to unite four of five nations in a peaceful alliance. Dekanawida has had a powerful vision that the end of the world will result if peace is not achieved among all of the nations. But one leader, the brutal Atotarho, continues to wage war throughout the lands. The Gears' tale is vast and sweeping, with a large cast of characters and the very fate of the world at stake. Readers interested in Native American legends will find much to enjoy here, as the Gears show their great knowledge of and affection for their subject matter. The novel works well as an epic adventure, and its fight scenes are particularly effective, though the overall pace of the plot may be a bit slow for some readers. As with many series, it may also be difficult to follow without having read its predecessors. That said, the novel will please the Gears' fans, and may broadly appeal to readers who enjoy other complex fantasy tales. A well-crafted chapter in the Gears' ongoing series.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780765365606
  • Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates
  • Publication date: 8/27/2013
  • Series: North America's Forgotten Past Series , #20
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 507
  • Sales rank: 114,200
  • Product dimensions: 4.10 (w) x 6.70 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

KATHLEEN O’NEAL GEAR is a former state historian and archaeologist for Wyoming, Kansas, and Nebraska for the U.S. Department of the Interior. She has twice received the federal government’s Special Achievement Award for “outstanding management” of our nation’s cultural heritage.

W. MICHAEL GEAR, who holds a master’s degree in archaeology, has worked as a professional archaeologist since 1978. He is currently principal investigator for Wind River Archaeological Consultants.

The Gears, whose First North American series hit the international as well as USA Today and New York Times bestseller lists, live in Thermopolis, Wyoming.

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Read an Excerpt

One

 

As Sonon strode through the evening forest, his black cape parted the sea of frigid air, leaving ice crystals swirling behind him. Every twig on the maples and giant sycamores was sheathed in white. Far out in the trees, owls watched him with their feathers fluffed out for warmth, their eyes shining.

Deep cold was a quiet monster. It slithered into clothing, stiffened leather, and afflicted bones with agony. Its unnaturally silent voice made ears crave even the slightest sound. The sheer vastness of the frozen land pressed down upon him tonight.

What is my offering? What can I give him to help him?

When he crested the hill and gazed out across the valley where hundreds of campfires glittered, he took a few moments to contemplate the next few days. He suspected they would be some of the most difficult of his existence.

He inhaled a deep breath, and started down the hill toward the warriors who had waged the battle. Frozen flowers hid amid the shriveled leaves on the sides of the trail, dead, folded in upon themselves.

As he neared Yellowtail Village, smoke flowed upward from the charred longhouses and obliterated the glittering Path of Souls that painted a white swath across the night sky. His People, the People of the Hills, believed that each person had two souls. One remained with the bones forever. The other, the afterlife soul, stayed on earth for ten days. Then, if it were lucky enough to be properly prepared, it followed the Path of Souls to a long bridge that spanned a dark abyss. On this side of the bridge were all the animals a person had ever known in his life. The animals who had loved him helped him across. Those that he had mistreated chased him, trying to force him to fall off the bridge into eternal darkness. If his animal helpers were strong enough and he made it to the other side, he would be greeted by his ancestors in the Land of the Dead.

Some people, however, had trouble finding the Path of Souls. Especially those who died violently.

His eyes narrowed. On the battlefield below, dead bodies lay contorting as they froze. There must be thousands of glistening soul lights, lost souls, out there bobbing and swaying in confusion, searching for loved ones to take care of them. If Sonon closed his eyes, he could hear their spectral cries rising.

He folded his arms beneath his cape, trying to stay warm while he continued thinking.

Yes, maybe …

Perhaps the single greatest truth of life was that the dead were not dead. Their shadows lived. They wandered the forests, slept in crackling fires and ancient sycamores, they huddled in grass that wept and stones that whimpered. They were the painted prayersticks that Great Grandmother Earth used to dance life in and out of this world. If humans could only learn to watch shadows pass like a mountain did, they would understand that death was just a whisper.

“Is that my offering?”

War songs lilted through the sparkling air, mixing eerily with the sobs and moans coming from the destroyed villages.

“Yes,” he said softly, deciding. “A glimpse from inside the mountain.”

 

Copyright © 2012 by Kathleen O’Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 14 )
Rating Distribution

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(9)

4 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 14 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 26, 2014

    Highly recommended.

    I have read all of the "People of" books over the years. The stories are great and hold my interest. The authors put a lot of work into the research for each book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2013

    Wonderful series.

    The Gear's people of series of books are must reads. If you have not had the chance to read them you must put it on your list of books to read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2013

    Black sun

    Good book

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2012

    Fantastic. Read them all

    I have never been disappointed in any of the People of series! I realize it's fiction but the Gears have so much science behind their books, I easily get lost.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 16, 2012

    A great ending to a Dynamic series

    I have to read this book a second time immediately because of the scope and nature of the story. I am blown away by the imagery of the majestic scope of the battles, and adventures that have occurred to the characters with in the long house series. I had drawn out hope that Cord had survived the ambush of his war party after their desperate salvation of the People of the Yellowtail village, and Bur Oak village. I was so overwhelmed in the devastation that Atotharho brought to the people, how so many was barely surviving by their fingernails breath. I was lost in the story of Baji and Sky Massager that it took a while to realize that she was like Sonon, and although seen by many of the characters it was she who was lost in the battle and consumed by Atotharho... I love the fact that despite the desire of a writer to bring a good end to the dramatic story that they allowed Atotharho to come to his authentic reality. This story brings appreciation to the acts of peace makers throughout the world. Sky Messager like Gandhi had to endure and face things that a normal man cannot bear to endure, and to come out without seeking his own personal needs.
    Yes it is a fitting end to the series that did blow me a way as I cried in the morning while I turned the last few pages I desperately needed to finish to just to see how it all turned out.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2013

    Disappointing

    I love, love, love these authors, but this series was one of the most disappointing reads I've ever had! This HUGE buildup and, what I believe, to be one of the biggest cop-outs of every author of pre-historic people have ever used.....the eclipse...skip this entire series...

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 29, 2013

    Great end to the People of the Longhouse series

    I've never been disappointed by a book written by the Gears and this one is no exception. It takes a few minutes to remember all the characters from the previous Longhouse books, but it all comes back and then some. What a riveting story to complete the series. You have monstrous villans, brave heros and heroines and the story just sparks with action. I would highly recommend the book and if you haven't read the previous books of the series I would tell you that you should and you will be glad that you took the time to do so. I can't wait for a new People book to come out.

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    Posted February 4, 2013

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    Posted December 9, 2012

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    Posted December 24, 2012

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    Posted September 28, 2013

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    Posted October 17, 2012

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    Posted February 20, 2014

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    Posted July 25, 2013

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