People, Problems, and Proofs: Essays from Gödel's Lost Letter: 2010

Overview

This book offers insights into key topics in theoretical computer science and mathematics. The authors have considerable experience in distilling the essence of complex issues into manageable essays that summarize and explain the key developments, historical context, and likely directions in topics such as complexity, computability and algorithms.

The book will be of interest to those interested in or engaged in the key topics in theoretical computer science, ranging from ...

See more details below
Hardcover (2013)
$37.41
BN.com price
(Save 6%)$39.99 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (9) from $28.38   
  • New (7) from $28.38   
  • Used (2) from $37.40   
Sending request ...

Overview

This book offers insights into key topics in theoretical computer science and mathematics. The authors have considerable experience in distilling the essence of complex issues into manageable essays that summarize and explain the key developments, historical context, and likely directions in topics such as complexity, computability and algorithms.

The book will be of interest to those interested in or engaged in the key topics in theoretical computer science, ranging from advanced researchers to graduate students of computer science.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9783642414213
  • Publisher: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
  • Publication date: 12/31/2013
  • Edition description: 2013
  • Pages: 333
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Richard Lipton is the Storey Professor of Computer Science at Georgia Institute of Technology; previously he held faculty positions at Yale University, the University of California at Berkeley, and Princeton University. His research is focused primarily on the theory of computation, where he has made seminal contributions. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, an ACM Fellow, and a Guggenheim Fellow. Kenneth Regan is a professor of computer science at The State University of New York at Buffalo. His research interests include computational complexity. He is an international chess master and an expert on investigating cheating in chess.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

The Claimant, the Readers, and the Crowd.- Kenneth Iverson: Notation and Thinking.- Edmund Hillary: Proofs and Mountain Climbing.- Leonardo da Vinci: Proofs as Art.- Michael Atiyah: The Role of Proof.- Subhash Khot: Unique Games Conjecture.- Arno van den Essen: An Amazing Conjecture.- Richard Hamilton: Group Efforts.- Grigori Perelman: A New Clay Problem.- Eric Allender: Solvable Groups.- Enrico Bombieri: On Intuition.- Fred Hennie: Lower Bounds.- Volker Strassen: Amazing Results.- Adam Smith: Dumb Channels.- Georg Cantor: Diagonal Method.- Raymond Smullyan: The Reals Are Uncountable.- William Tutte: Flow Problems.- Basil Rathbone: Writing a Major Result.- Elwyn Berlekamp: Dots And Boxes.- David Johnson: Galactic Algorithms.- Warren Hirsch: Guessing The Truth.- Shimon Even: A Promise Problem.- Matei David: Improving Noam Nisan’s Generator.- Ryan Williams: A New Lower Bound.- Joel Seiferas: More on the New Lower Bound.- Victor Klee: Big Results.- George Dantzig: Equations, Equations, and Equations.- Srinivasa Ramanujan: The Role of Amateurs.- John Rhodes: Approaches to Problems.- John Nash: Connections.- Chee Yap: Computing Digits of π.- Henri Lebesgue: Projections Are Tricky.- Nina Balcan: A New Model of Complexity.- Sam Buss: Bounded Logic.- Anton Klyachko: Car Crashes.- Bernard Chazelle: Natural Algorithms.- Thomas Jech: The Axiom of Choice.- Alfonso Bedoya: Definitions, Definitions, and Definitions.- Hartley Rogers: Complexity Classes.- Ron Fagin: Second Order Logic.- Daniel Lokshtanov: Knapsack Problem.- Albert Einstein: Beyond Polynomial Equations.- Denis Thérien: Solvable Groups.- Andreas Björklund: Hamiltonian Cycles.- David Hilbert: The Nullstellensatz.- John Hopcroft: Thinking out of the Box.- Dick Karp: The Polynomial Hierarchy.- Nick Howgrave-Graham and Antoine Joux: Attacking the Knapsack Problem.- Hedy Lamarr: The Role of Amateurs.- Nicolas Courtois: The Linearization Method.- Neal Koblitz: Attacks on Crypto-systems.- Richard Feynman: Miracle Numbers.- Patrick Fischer: Programming Turing Machines.- Roger Apéry: Explaining Proofs.- Ron Rivest: Mathematical Gifts.- Frank Ryan: The Quarterback Teaches.- Leonard Schulman: Associativity.- Paul Seymour: Graph Minors.- Alfred Tarski: Lower Bounds on Theories.- Ken Thompson: Playing Chess.- Virginia Vassilevska: Fixing Tournaments.- Arkadev Chattopadhyay: Computing Modulo Composites.- Charles Bennett: Quantum Prools.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)