Perfect Princess (Princess Diaries Series) [NOOK Book]

Overview

Sleeping Beauty,
Victoria,
Cleopatra,
Snow White,
Elizabeth,
...

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Perfect Princess (Princess Diaries Series)

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Overview

Sleeping Beauty,
Victoria,
Cleopatra,
Snow White,
Elizabeth,
Pocahontas,
Mia Thermopolis:
all princesses

Do YOU have what it takes
to be a princess?

princess mia will help you find out

Best-selling Princess Diaries author Meg Cabot and acclaimed fashion artist Chesley McLaren team up again to display this clever royal roster of princesses of the world. Big or small, old or new, fact or fiction, our favorite princess Amelia Mignonette Grimaldi Thermopolis Renaldo (aka Mia) will point out why these princesses rule, and how any girl can too!

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Interactive concepts dress up a variety of new titles for girls. On the subject of royal dos and don'ts, Perfect Princess: A Princess Diaries Book by Meg Cabot, illus. by Chesley McLaren, provides witty history and how-to information regarding princess-like behavior in a paper-over-board, deep pink package. The narration alternates between main characters from the series, and dishes up dozens of royals, both real (Grace Kelly and Queen Noor) and fictional (Wonder Woman and Snow White). Humorous sidebars offer beauty tips ("Be like Leia: Experiment with new hairstyles!"). Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Here's Cabot's second diary-size, princess-pink volume of advice to aspiring princesses by HRH Mia Thermopolis, Princess of Genovia. This time, she, her grandmother and friends rely on examples from history and fiction, mostly fairytales (fractured), cartoons, and films. Representatives of actual royals range from Queen Elizabeth I and Queen Noor of Jordan to exotic others like Cleopatra and Wu Zetian of China, who inspire advice in the form of "Random Acts of Princess," some of which are pretty lame—comments on poor little Anastasia of Russia are downright tasteless. It has to be said that this instruction manual is not as witty and cool as the previous Princess Lessons. Maybe there's just not that much left to be said about being a princess these days; maybe too many of the princesses are chosen from Disney cartoons, animations, comic books, and fantasy films. Princess Mia has lost some of her edge, and it wouldn't hurt to cut down on the use of her favorite comment, "Whatever!" Still, there are some heartening moments; for example, when Princess Alice of Greece whacks Czar Nicholas with her shoe to discourage his excessive rice-throwing at her 1903 wedding. "Way to go, Alice!" Teens will probably enjoy Chesley McLaren's sly and slightly skewed depictions of royalty and appreciate Mia's list of should-be princesses, which includes Buffy, the Vampire Slayer. After all, as Mia declares, "We think princesses rule." 2004, HarperCollins, Ages 12 to 16.
—Barbara L. Talcroft
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061971952
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/6/2009
  • Series: Princess Diaries
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 160
  • Sales rank: 533,722
  • Age range: 13 - 17 Years
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Meg Cabot was born in Bloomington, Indiana. In addition to her adult contemporary fiction, she is the author of the bestselling young adult fiction series, The Princess Diaries. More than 25 million copies of her novels for children and adults have sold worldwide. Meg lives in Key West, Florida, with her husband.

Biography

Meg Cabot knows that one of the best cures for feeling gawky and conspicuous is reading about someone who sticks out even more than you do. Her books for young adults invariably feature girls who have extraordinary powers that carry extraordinary burdens. Cabot's Princess Diaries series offers up the secret thoughts of Mia Thermopolis, who discovers at age 14 that she is actually the princess of a small European country. This revelation adds significantly to her extant concerns about crushes, friendships, school, and other matters falling under adolescent scrutiny.

Cabot, a native of Indiana weaned on Judy Blume and Barbara Cartland, was already a successful romance novelist (as Patricia Cabot) before she began writing for young adults; her alter-alter ego, Jenny Carroll, began a new series shortly after The Princess Diaries debuted. The Carroll books are divided between the Mediator series, starring a girl who can communicate with restless ghosts; and the 1-800-WHERE-R-YOU books, in which a girl struck by lightning acquires the ability to locate missing people.

Cabot writes her books in a conspiratorial, first-person style that resonates with her readers. She has obviously kept a grip on the vernacular and the key issues of adolescence; but what makes her books so irresistible is the mixing of the mundane with the fantastic. After all, who wouldn't like to wake up and be a princess all of a sudden, or a seer? Cabot takes such offhand notions and roots them firmly in the details of average, middle-class American life. She has also tiptoed into mystery and paranormal suspense with other YA novels and series installments.

Cabot continues to write adult novels under various permutations of her given name (Meggin Patricia Cabot): from 19th-century historical romances to contemporary chick lit. And, as with her books for teens, these romances have earned praise for their lighthearted humor and well drawn characters.

Good To Know

Some interesting outtakes from our interview with Cabot:

"I am left handed."

"I hate tomatoes of any kind."

"I really wanted to be veterinarian, but I got a 410 on my math SATs."

"Writing used to be my hobby, but now that it's my job, I have no hobby -- except watching TV and laying around the pool reading US Weekly. I have tried many hobbies, such as knitting, Pilates, ballet, yoga, and guitar, but none of them have taken. So I guess I'm stuck with no hobby.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Meggin Patricia Cabot (full name); Patricia Cabot, Jenny Caroll
    2. Hometown:
      New York, New York
    1. Education:
      B.A. in fine arts, Indiana University, 1991
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Perfect Princess: A Princess Diaries Book (PLM)

A Note from
Her Royal Highness Princess Mia

Grandmère says the only way we as a society can learn from our mistakes is carefully to scrutinize them, and vow never to repeat them. I guess this would explain why I'm stuck in princess lessons with her every single weekday from four to six.

Not surprisingly, Grandmère thinks SHE's the most suitable person to consult about royal role models. She says in her day, young women did not look up to scantily clad, weapon-wielding princesses such as Xena and "that other one, the one with the robots and the buns on the sides of her head" (!!!!!!) but to royals such as Princess Margaret and Isabel of Spain.

And though Grandmère says that there are any number of highly memorable princesses she would recommend that I emulate, she always adds, "Though I feel I can say — without flattering myself, which would be highly unprincesslike — that I'm probably your most suitable role model."

Whatever! I suppose it is setting a good example to smoke a pack a day and swill down about a zillion Sidecars before breakfast.

On the other hand, it's true you hardly ever read about Grandmère in the National Enquirer. She is the epitome of discretion. At least, outside the confines of the palace. Inside, all bets are off.

Elizabeth,
the Late Queen Mother
by Grandmère, Dowager Princess of Genovia,
grandmother to Mia Thermopolis

[with commentary by Princess Mia]

The late queen mother of Great Britain — often vulgarly referred to as the "Queen Mum"— is a perfect example of a princess who comported herself with grace and dignity throughout her long life. The mother of the longest-ruling sovereign in British history, one of Queen "Bess's" most notable contributions to the throne was her insistence that her family stay together during World War II. Rather than shipping her two young daughters, the Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret, to safety in the countryside, as many London parents were doing, the queen kept the girls at her side in the palace . . . a palace that was frequently strafed by Luftwaffe gunfire and even, on several occasions, bombed by the Nazi horde.

Her Majesty refused to be daunted by this senseless onslaught, and bravely visited her less fortunate subjects, commoners whose own homes had been blown to smithereens, in the very craters in which their beds once stood, offering tips as to how the damage might be repaired while never getting so much as a smudge on her crisp cotton gloves. Indomitable and cheerful throughout her husband's reign, the queen mother is a perfect example of a regent who showed grace under pressure . . . and always while wearing a delightful confection of a chapeau.

[Um. Okay. The part about not fearing the Nazis is cool.]
Grandmère's Random Act of Princess:

Be like the queen mother: Brighten the day of someone less fortunate than yourself by going to visit him or her while wearing a pair of white gloves and a charming hat with an adorable matching clutch. The poor soul will be cheered by the effort you will have made to look your best.

England's Princesses
Elizabeth and Margaret

Like their mother, the young Windsor princesses showed remarkable character during their teen years, despite living under constant threat of being murdered in their beds by an invading Nazi scourge. The brave princesses cheerfully assisted their mother in rolling bandages for the Royal Air Force, and wore cunning little khaki Wren uniforms, just like all the other British girls who chose to volunteer to stop the tyrannical oppression of the Axis powers by running canteens and casino nights for war-weary British soldiers. Through it all they had to endure not only the knowledge that they might at any moment be blown to kingdom come, but also rationing, as things like sugar and — perish the thought! — silk stockings were scarce and had to be saved for the war effort.

Perhaps most horrifying of all, during the height of the war, the princesses were forced to bathe in a maximum of only four inches of tepid water, and only once daily. I have it on certain authority that their mother put tape inside the tub to indicate the level the water was not to exceed. Such privations are doubtless why the two princesses grew into such responsible and respectable women, well capable of bearing the aristocratic mantle thrust upon them so early in life.

[That's nothing. During water shortages in the summer time here in NYC, the mayor's office issues directives about how often you are supposed to flush the toilet. Having to endure something like that is what I call character building. In fact, I might even be scarred for life.]

Mia's Random Act of Princess:

Be like Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret: Grow a Victory garden! You don't need a yard to do it, either. Plant basil and parsley seeds in cups of soil and place them on your windowsill. Snip off leaves when they are grown to add to salads, pasta dishes, even pizzas! This way, if an invading force ever enters YOUR city and supply lines to your local grocery store are cut off, you'll still have the ability to make tasty treats for your friends.

Perfect Princess: A Princess Diaries Book (PLM)
. Copyright © by Meg Cabot. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Table of Contents

Introduction: All I Need to Know I Learned from Princesses, by Princess Amelia Mignonette Grimaldi Thermopolis Renaldo xv
I. Perfect Princesses: Dowager Princess Clarisse Renaldo offers a selection of perfect-princess role models 1
II. Style Princesses: Hair and makeup guru Paolo and fashionisto Sebastiano discuss principessas whose royal wardrobes have profoundly impacted the world. Also: Cousin Hank Thermopolis makes a special guest appearance 25
III. Mrs. Princess: Tina Hakim Baba names princesses who only became princesses because they were lucky enough to marry princes 47
IV. Power Princesses: Renowned social activist Lilly Moscovitz comments on princesses who wielded mighty scepters 65
V. Action Princesses: Royal Consort Michael Moscovitz reflects upon his ideal princess ... and surprisingly, it is not Princess Leia 85
VI. Politically Correct Princesses: Princess Mia sheds light on the valuable lessons contained in popular fairy tales 105
VII. Wannabe Princesses: Princess Mia decrees just who is, and who is not, a real princess 121
VIII. Should- Be Princesses: Princess Mia lists those who are not princesses but ought to be 131
Conclusion: Getting in touch with your inner princess 141
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First Chapter

Perfect Princess: A Princess Diaries Book

A Note from
Her Royal Highness Princess Mia

Grandmère says the only way we as a society can learn from our mistakes is carefully to scrutinize them, and vow never to repeat them. I guess this would explain why I'm stuck in princess lessons with her every single weekday from four to six.

Not surprisingly, Grandmère thinks SHE's the most suitable person to consult about royal role models. She says in her day, young women did not look up to scantily clad, weapon-wielding princesses such as Xena and "that other one, the one with the robots and the buns on the sides of her head" (!!!!!!) but to royals such as Princess Margaret and Isabel of Spain.

And though Grandmère says that there are any number of highly memorable princesses she would recommend that I emulate, she always adds, "Though I feel I can say -- without flattering myself, which would be highly unprincesslike -- that I'm probably your most suitable role model."

Whatever! I suppose it is setting a good example to smoke a pack a day and swill down about a zillion Sidecars before breakfast.

On the other hand, it's true you hardly ever read about Grandmère in the National Enquirer. She is the epitome of discretion. At least, outside the confines of the palace. Inside, all bets are off.

Elizabeth,
the Late Queen Mother

by Grandmère, Dowager Princess of Genovia,
grandmother to Mia Thermopolis

[with commentary by Princess Mia]

The late queen mother of Great Britain -- often vulgarly referred to as the "Queen Mum" -- is a perfect example of a princess who comported herself with grace and dignity throughout her long life. The mother of the longest-ruling sovereign in British history, one of Queen "Bess's" most notable contributions to the throne was her insistence that her family stay together during World War II. Rather than shipping her two young daughters, the Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret, to safety in the countryside, as many London parents were doing, the queen kept the girls at her side in the palace . . . a palace that was frequently strafed by Luftwaffe gunfire and even, on several occasions, bombed by the Nazi horde.

Her Majesty refused to be daunted by this senseless onslaught, and bravely visited her less fortunate subjects, commoners whose own homes had been blown to smithereens, in the very craters in which their beds once stood, offering tips as to how the damage might be repaired while never getting so much as a smudge on her crisp cotton gloves. Indomitable and cheerful throughout her husband's reign, the queen mother is a perfect example of a regent who showed grace under pressure . . . and always while wearing a delightful confection of a chapeau.

[Um. Okay. The part about not fearing the Nazis is cool.]

Grandmère's Random Act of Princess:

Be like the queen mother: Brighten the day of someone less fortunate than yourself by going to visit him or her while wearing a pair of white gloves and a charming hat with an adorable matching clutch. The poor soul will be cheered by the effort you will have made to look your best.

England's Princesses
Elizabeth and Margaret

Like their mother, the young Windsor princesses showed remarkable character during their teen years, despite living under constant threat of being murdered in their beds by an invading Nazi scourge. The brave princesses cheerfully assisted their mother in rolling bandages for the Royal Air Force, and wore cunning little khaki Wren uniforms, just like all the other British girls who chose to volunteer to stop the tyrannical oppression of the Axis powers by running canteens and casino nights for war-weary British soldiers. Through it all they had to endure not only the knowledge that they might at any moment be blown to kingdom come, but also rationing, as things like sugar and -- perish the thought! -- silk stockings were scarce and had to be saved for the war effort.

Perhaps most horrifying of all, during the height of the war, the princesses were forced to bathe in a maximum of only four inches of tepid water, and only once daily. I have it on certain authority that their mother put tape inside the tub to indicate the level the water was not to exceed. Such privations are doubtless why the two princesses grew into such responsible and respectable women, well capable of bearing the aristocratic mantle thrust upon them so early in life.

[That's nothing. During water shortages in the summer time here in NYC, the mayor's office issues directives about how often you are supposed to flush the toilet. Having to endure something like that is what I call character building. In fact, I might even be scarred for life.]

Mia's Random Act of Princess:

Be like Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret: Grow a Victory garden! You don't need a yard to do it, either. Plant basil and parsley seeds in cups of soil and place them on your windowsill. Snip off leaves when they are grown to add to salads, pasta dishes, even pizzas! This way, if an invading force ever enters YOUR city and supply lines to your local grocery store are cut off, you'll still have the ability to make tasty treats for your friends.

Perfect Princess: A Princess Diaries Book. Copyright © by Meg Cabot. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 15 )
Rating Distribution

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(12)

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Sort by: Showing all of 15 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2014

    Haven't accually read...........;(

    I have not really read this yet, but, how bad could it be????


    Stay in school. Be intelligent.;)
    (and no

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2013

    How

    Good is this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2012

    One direction

    Love my husbands so very much

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 17, 2011

    This book

    This book sounds interesting to read out loud to a friend or just read the book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2006

    Booklovers Banquet!

    This is an awesome book to show girls that real inner princess that everyone can show. Cabot out-does herself with yet another 'Perfect Princess' book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2006

    The Book is A Princess!

    This book is outstanding! Me, myself has loved and and has enjoyed it when i have nothing to read. I think all girls should have this book if they dream to be a princess! I have just loved it. It's outstanding, fascinating, and wonderful!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2005

    the best book

    This is one of the best books i read ever i would recommend this book to people of all ages.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2005

    BEST BOOK IN THE LAND

    This was probably my favorite Prinsess Diaries book of them all! It was nice how it was still in the same format as #1-5 but was shorter than those book. I also like that it still had a lesson to teach

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 31, 2004

    THIS BOOK TAUGHT ME SO MUCH ABOUT MY FAVORITE THING........ PRINCESSES

    PRINCESSES ARE MY FAVORITE SUBJECT AND THIS BOOK HELP LEARN ALOT MORE THEN I KNEW ABOUT PRINCESSES FROM THE PAST PRESENT AND PRETEND I LOVED IT.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2004

    For all Princesses and Princesses at Heart.

    I love this book. I will be a princess one day, hopefully a queen, and even though some of the stuff is out there, it helps you with everyday problems as well. Like, how to stand, eat, talk, walk, and do your hair, as well as being funny energetic and a page turner, if you could believe that. Its a great book for girls who want to be different, meaning, wanting to be classy and well-spoken, not the kind of girls that are trash. Have a good one, and read all Meg's books.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2004

    A Fan of the Princess Diaries books

    This book was great! It was a fantastic follow-up to the original, Princess Lessons. It has interesting information on princesses(real and imaginary)that isn't like reading history books, but does give you insight on their lives. The bios are written by different members of the PD gang, all with contrasting styles. And it even has insights by Princess Mia herself. It is written by Meg Cabot and has all her sassiness and creativity that all her books have. And the illustrations by Chesley McLaren are fantastic too. I promise by the end of this book you will feel better about yourself, do better things for others, and possibly feel like a princess yourself!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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