Perfect Ruin (Internment Chronicles Series #1) [NOOK Book]

Overview

From the New York Times bestselling author of The Chemical Garden trilogy: On the floating city of Internment, you can be anything you dream. Unless you approach the edge. Children’s Literature says “shades of Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World and George Orwell’s 1984 inspire DeStefano’s sci-fi/murder mystery page-turner.”

Morgan Stockhour knows getting too close to the edge of Internment, the floating city and her home, can lead to madness. ...
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Perfect Ruin (Internment Chronicles Series #1)

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Overview

From the New York Times bestselling author of The Chemical Garden trilogy: On the floating city of Internment, you can be anything you dream. Unless you approach the edge. Children’s Literature says “shades of Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World and George Orwell’s 1984 inspire DeStefano’s sci-fi/murder mystery page-turner.”

Morgan Stockhour knows getting too close to the edge of Internment, the floating city and her home, can lead to madness. Even though her older brother, Lex, was a Jumper, Morgan vows never to end up like him. There’s too much for her on Internment: her parents, best friend Pen, and her betrothed, Basil. Her life is ordinary and safe, even if she sometimes does wonder about the ground and why it’s forbidden.

Then a murder, the first in a generation, rocks the city. With whispers swirling and fear on the wind, Morgan can no longer stop herself from investigating, especially once she meets Judas. Betrothed to the victim, Judas is being blamed for the murder, but Morgan is convinced of his innocence. Secrets lay at the heart of Internment, but nothing can prepare Morgan for what she will find—or whom she will lose.
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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Kathleen Karr
Fresh from her success with The Chemical Garden Trilogy, Lauren DeStefano begins another dystopian trilogy. Book one introduces the free-floating island kingdom of Internment through the viewpoint of its narrator, sixteen-year-old Morgan. The perfectly organized society hovering in the sky over the home planet Ground has matched Morgan at birth to her current boyfriend—and future husband—Basil. How enlightened, one thinks, to be able to watch teenage romance blossom under the approval not only of parents, but the entire world. Then pieces of background information slip into place, leaving questions. Why is half the city's population, including Morgan's mother, addicted to state-approved elixirs? Why must her blind brother attend weekly "Jumpers" therapy sessions? Why is Judas an honored name for males? Then, after the brutally slashed body of a fellow Academy student is found on the railroad tracks: Who really murdered Daphne Leander? Tensions mount as the tightly knit society falls apart before Morgan's eyes. Shades of Aldous Huxley's Brave New World and George Orwell's 1984 inspire DeStefano's sci-fi/murder mystery page-turner, and can profitably be taught in conjunction with it. After The Edge, what, in the name of the heavens, comes next? Book One in the "Internment Chronicles." Reviewer: Kathleen Karr
School Library Journal
★ 01/01/2014
Gr 7 Up—The citizens of Internment don't view their city as a prison, despite its name. Suspended in the clouds high above the ground, surrounded by a force field of wind, the people believe that they are especially beloved of the sky god. Occasionally, however, someone will attempt to breach the high fence that circles the island and jump over the edge-an act that is strictly forbidden. Morgan Stockhour, 16, has been shunned by most students at the Academy ever since her older brother attempted a jump. She tells no one, not even best friend, Pen, or her betrothed, Basil, about the dark thoughts she harbors. When a young woman is murdered and fear begins to taint the idyllic life of the floating metropolis, Morgan finds herself helping the accused murderer and questioning everything she knows about Internment. In the midst of these troubles, the romance between Morgan and Basil offers a sweet counterpart to the pall that hangs over the city. DeStefano draws out the story slowly, building the anxiety and confusion with revelations gradually coming to light. Her prose flits from straightforward to lyrical as the story seesaws between gloom and hope. Fans of speculative fiction will enjoy DeStefano's concoction of tension and love with a cliff-hanger ending.—Eric Norton, McMillan Memorial Library, Wisconsin Rapids
Publishers Weekly
09/09/2013
Totalitarianism is boring. The challenge for authors of totalitarian dystopias is to write about the boredom in interesting ways—a challenge that DeStefano (the Chemical Garden Trilogy) doesn’t quite surmount in this first book in the Internment Chronicles. Morgan Stockhour is a good tenth-year student who loves her state-mandated betrothed, Basil, and thinks her floating island country, Internment, is beautiful. True, Internment’s history is based on the ground god’s rejection and banishment of its people, but the god of the sky looks after them, as does portly King Furlow and kindly patrolmen like Morgan’s father. Morgan’s world is studded with allegory and symbol: her brother, Lex, looked over the edge of their world and was struck blind; an accused murderer is named Judas; the trains always run on time. It’s difficult not to pity Morgan—she’s a government-molded drone trapped in a familiar dystopian structure, despite the novelty of the setting. Still, love creeps in, and nascent rebellion finally stirs when Morgan realizes that not even the most benevolent despot can keep her world secure and stable. Ages 12–up. Agent: Barbara Poelle, Irene Goodman Literary Agency. (Oct.)
The Bulletin
"Definite excitment...."
starred review Booklist
* "DeStefano has created a perfect storm—intertwining plot, characters, and setting beautifully. From the first page, readers will be enticed by Morgan’s voice, precise in its descriptions yet filled with curiosity.... This is a page-turner, and waiting for the next book will be hard, hard, hard."
Booklist
"DeStefano creates a believable world in her sky city...."
Kirkus Reviews
2013-09-01
An original premise dominates this latest dystopia: A city has floated above the Earth, apparently for millennia. Is it a prison or a refuge? Sixteen-year-old Morgan feels trapped on Internment, her city that floats on a rock in the sky. Her brother Lex tried to jump from their island, only to go blind in the attempt. As the story slowly unfolds, readers learn that Internment is a totalitarian monarchy. Morgan's best friend, Pen, loves her life on Internment, believing all the propaganda even as she enjoys flouting the suffocating rules. Morgan, however, learns that the king and his government do not merely closely watch those they suspect of nonconformity--sometimes they kill them. When a girl is found murdered and excerpts from a subversive paper the dead girl had written begin to appear, Morgan finds herself pulled ever more strongly into opposition. DeStefano creates a believable world in her sky city, with a nicely done police-state theme. If the story moves along slowly, related in Morgan's flat present-tense narration, it remains interesting enough. Characters are developed well, including the dead girl through her quotations. Suspense builds slowly as the plot unfolds, ending, of course, on a cliffhanger. The setting may be novel enough to keep readers going. (Dystopian adventure. 12 & up)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781442480629
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
  • Publication date: 10/1/2013
  • Series: Internment Chronicles Series , #1
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 368
  • Sales rank: 67,632
  • Age range: 12 - 17 Years
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Lauren DeStefano is the author of The Internment Chronicles and The Chemical Garden trilogy, which includes Wither, Fever, and Sever. She earned her BA in English with a concentration in creative writing from Albertus Magnus College in Connecticut. Visit her at LaurenDeStefano.com.
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Read an Excerpt

Perfect Ruin

You have all heard the warnings about the edge. We have been told its winds are a song that will hypnotize us, and by the time we awaken from that trance, it will be too late.

—“Intangible Gods,” Daphne Leander, Year Ten

wE LIVE ENCAPSULATED by the trains. They go around in a perfect oval at all hours, stopping for thirty-five seconds in each section so the commuters are able to board and depart. Beyond the tracks, after the fence, there’s sky. Engineers crafted a scope so that we can see the ground below us. We can see tall buildings and other sorts of trains—some of which disappear underground or rise onto bridges. We can see patches of cities and towns that appear stitched like one of Lex’s blankets.

We’ve never been able to craft a scope advanced enough to see the people—it isn’t allowed. We’ve been banished to the sky. I’m told they can see Internment, though. I wonder, what must we look like to them? A giant oval of the earth with rocks and roots clinging to the bottom, I suppose. I’ve seen sketches of what Internment looks like as a whole, and it’s as though a giant hand came down and took a piece right out of the ground, and here we are floating in the sky.

When I was a child, I used to think about the day Internment was ripped from the ground and placed in the sky. I used to wonder if the people were frightened, or if they felt fortunate to be saved. I used to imagine that I was a part of Interment’s first generation. I’d close my eyes and feel the ground under my feet going up and up and up.

“Ms. Stockhour,” Instructor Newlan says, “you’re dreaming with your eyes open again. Page forty-six.”

I look at the textbook open before me and realize I haven’t been keeping up with the lesson since page thirty-two.

“I don’t suppose you would care to add to our discussion.” He always paces between the rows of desks as he lectures, and now he’s stopped before me.

“The festival of stars?” I say, but I’m only guessing. I have an incurably wandering mind, a fact that has given Instructor Newlan much cheerful cause to torture me. The chorus of chuckles from my classmates confirms I’m wrong.

“We’ve moved on to geography,” Pen says from beside me. She glances from me to the instructor, curls bouncing around her cheeks and creating a perfect ambiance for the look of contrition on her face; if Instructor Newlan thinks she’s sorry for speaking out of turn, he won’t give her a demerit. He likes her; she’s the only one left fully conscious after his geography lectures—she’d like to work on the maps when she’s older. He gives her a wry glance over his glasses, flips my book to the correct page, and goes on.

“I do realize that it’s December first,” Instructor Newlan says. “I know we’re all excited for the festival of stars to begin, but let us remember that there is plenty of class work to be done in the meantime.”

The festival of stars is a monthlong celebration, and in the excitement and preparations, it’s common for students and adults alike to daydream. But while the rest of Internment daydreams of normal things—gifts and requests to the god of the sky—I dream of things that are dangerous and could have me arrested or killed. I stare at the edge of my desk and imagine it’s the end of my little world.

After the class is over, I wait for Basil before I move for the door. He always insists on catching the same shuttle to the train so he can escort me home. He worries. “Where does your mind go?” he asks me.

“She was thinking about the ground again,” Pen teases, linking her elbow around mine and squeezing against me. “I swear, with all your daydreams about the ground, you could be a novelist.”

I will never be disciplined enough to write a novel, not like my brother, Lex, who says I’m too much of an optimist to have any artistic prowess.

We walk quickly. Pen is trying to avoid Thomas, her betrothed, and the way she keeps glancing behind us, she isn’t even being inconspicuous.

We make it into a shuttle with hardly a second to spare. The shuttles are electric vehicles that are much smaller than train cars and therefore are usually crowded. We stand huddled by the door. Pen deflates with a quiet sigh of relief. Thomas is just leaving the academy as we depart.

Basil grips the overhead handle, and I grab his arm as a jolt knocks me into him. The reason for our betrothals is never explained to us, but I like to think the decision makers knew Basil was going to be taller than me. It can only be an act of good planning, the way my head fits into the hollow between his neck and shoulder.

I keep hold of Pen’s wrist so she doesn’t stumble, but she has no problem keeping her balance. She’s staring out at the clouds full of evening sunlight. They meander alongside Internment, but just when I think they’ll hit us, they evade, slipping under or over our little world like we’re a stone in their waters. Internment is encased by a sphere of wind that prevents the clouds from entering our city, though they seem close enough to touch.

The shuttle stops, pushing strangers into us. We’re lucky to be so close to the door, because everyone rushes to get out at once, hoping to catch the train so they won’t have to wait for the next one.

The train is not very crowded when we board, aside from the seats at the head of the car that are occupied by a group of pregnant women, chattering with one another about the details of their birthing class. Judging by their stomachs, I’d guess they’re carrying a round of January births.

The higher grades let out an hour after most work shifts end, and the younger children have another hour yet of classes. We find an empty row of seats wide enough to fit the three of us, and I deliberately usher Basil in first so that Pen won’t be the one to sit by the window. She has spent enough time staring at the clouds.

“They’ve already started decorating for the festival of stars,” I say, nodding to the silver-colored branches that frame the ceiling of our train car. From the branches hang little metal toys and trinkets that are meant to symbolize human desire—toy trains and books and miniature couples holding hands, the brass silhouette of true love.

The festival of stars overtakes the city in the month of December. It’s a time for giving gifts to our loved ones to show our gratitude for having them in our lives. And on the very last day, we’re allowed to make one big request of the god in the sky. Each request is written on a special piece of parchment that we aren’t meant to share with anyone else. The entire city gathers together, and our pieces of parchment are set on fire and cast into the sky, like hundreds of burning stars. We cling to one another and watch as our greatest desires are carried off and eventually extinguished, to be answered or denied.

“They’ve asked me to help with the murals this year,” Pen says, raising her chin in a modest show of pride. “Apparently one of the instructors recommended me to the festival committee.”

“It’s about time,” I say. “You couldn’t keep your talent a secret forever.”

She smiles. “I’m a bit nervous, if I’m going to be honest about it. All those people telling me what to draw. I’ve never been good at taking orders.”

She takes my shoulders and faces me away from her so that she can weave my straight dark hair into a braid. She says I waste my beauty, letting my hair fall over my shoulders like a mop.

Basil doesn’t comment on my appearance at all, although sometimes he says he hopes our children have my blue eyes; he says they make him think of what the water on the ground must look like. We’ve never seen it from up close, but we have the lakes here, which are sort of green.

“If they boss you around, just call it artistic license,” Basil says. “You can convince them to see it your way. You’re a good debater.”

“That is true,” Pen says cheerily. “Thanks, Basil.”

The train stops, and everyone getting off at the nearest section rises to their feet, but their haste is replaced by confusion. This isn’t the platform. Basil cranes his neck and tries to see ahead, but Pen is the one to notice the lights first. She abandons my braid, and my hair falls, undone. She jabs my ribs and says, “Look.”

Red-and-white medic lights are flashing off in the distance.

People around us are murmuring. There are medical emergencies sometimes, and despite the organization of the shuttles, accidents happen when people get too close to the moving vehicles. Once, there was an hour’s delay after one of the cattle animals broke through a fence and was struck by a train.

Pen and I start to get to our feet for a better look, but a jolt forces us back into our seats. We start moving again. But something is wrong. The scenery moves in the wrong direction.

We’re going backward.

Pen is alight with excitement. “I didn’t even know the train could go backward,” she says. “I wonder if it puts any strain on the gears.” At times her curiosity makes her brave.

I bite my lip, look out the window because no matter which direction we go, the sky looks the same. And the sky is familiar. The sky is safe.

There’s a half mile of land on the other side of the fence that lines the train track; I’ve never set foot on the other side of the tracks—we aren’t supposed to—but Lex has.

On Internment, you can be anything you dream—a novelist or a singer, a florist or a factory worker. You can spend entire afternoons watching clouds so close that it’s as though you’re riding them. Your life is yours to embrace or to squander. There’s only one rule: You don’t approach the edge. If you do, it’s already over. My brother is proof of that. He has successfully quieted any delusions I held about seeing the ground for myself.

My stomach is doing flip-flops, and I can’t decide if it’s excitement or fear.

I force myself to look away from the window, and my eyes find Basil’s.

Some of the other passengers seem excited, others confused.

A man several seats down, in a black suit, has begun talking to Pen about how trains have emergency systems, and shuttles too. He says that the train has moved backward before, several years before she was born, when repair work needed to be done on the track.

“So it could be that something just needs to be fixed,” he says.

One of the pregnant women is staring past Basil and me, out our window at the sky. Her lips are moving. It takes me a few seconds to realize that she’s talking to the god in the sky, something the people of Internment do only when they’re desperate.

“All this backward motion is starting to make me dizzy,” I say.

“It’s only because you’re worried,” Basil says. “You have great equilibrium. What was that spinning game you used to play when we were in first year?”

I let out a small laugh. “It wasn’t a game, really. I just liked to count how many times in a row I could spin without falling down.”

“Yes, but you would do it everywhere you went,” he says. “Up and down stairs, and in the aisles of the train, and all along the cobbles. You never seemed to get dizzy.”

“What an odd thing to remember,” I say, but it makes me smile. I would spin around the apartment from the time I awoke in the morning, jumping around my older brother and spinning after each step as we shared the mirror in the cramped water room. It drove him mad.

One morning as he was fixing his tie, he warned me that if I kept spinning, I’d be stolen by the wind and carried off into the sky. “We’ll never get you back then,” he said. The words were meant to frighten me, but instead they filled me with romantic notions that became a part of my game. I began to imagine being carried on the wind and landing on the ground, seeing for myself what was happening below our city. I could imagine such great and impossible things there. Things I didn’t have words for.

The madness of youth made me unafraid.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 32 )
Rating Distribution

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 32 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 4, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    Fans of Divergent and Matched will LOVE Perfect Ruin - 4.5 stars

    Fans of Divergent and Matched will LOVE Perfect Ruin - 4.5 stars!!

    Okay, I loooooved Perfect Ruin. I mean, it's about a city in the freaking sky! How is it that this hasn't been done before? Because, that idea is sheer brilliance. And, Lauren DeStefano executes it beautifully.

    Morgan lives on Internment, a city on a hunk of ground floating in the sky. As one would expect from an area the size of a postage stamp, everyone's lives - including, births, marriages and deaths - are very prescribed. It was thought that everyone was happy with things the way they were. Then, a young girl is murdered, which, like, NEVER happens. And, all of a sudden, the thought of escaping to the ground below becomes a thought more frequently occupying not only Morgan's mind. Which is akin to treason.

    This is the first book I've ever read by Lauren DeStefano, and I'm now left wondering why that is. Her writing is so beautiful. The way she describes this floating city and the people who live in it is like poetry.

    Morgan is the girl who tries to be good and conform to her society's standards, but just can't seem to stop imagining what more looks like. Her brother tried to jump over the edge once and was rendered blind because of it. He's sort of become her hero, even though she won't admit it. She's been betrothed to Basil since birth, and as it turns out, she actually doesn't mind. They really do love each other and are so freaking adorable together.

    Morgan starts asking the questions no one else wants to ask, and because of it, the perfect society that has been carefully constructed by the king and the king before him and before him starts to crumble. It goes to prove that sometimes just one or two people - even teenagers - can start a revolution.

    The supporting characters are amazingly drawn. Basil is absolutely wonderful - he's real deal book boyfriend material. He is unwaveringly supportive of Morgan and their commitment to each other. And that makes her love him all the more.

    Pen, the BFF, is quirky and cute. Her betrothed Thomas reminds me of Toraf from the Of Poseidon series by Anna Banks - he is utterly devoted to Pen, and she acts like she can't stand him, yet you know she loves him as much as he does her.

    Then, there's Judas and Amy, the betrothed and sister of the murdered girl. They're angry and sad and totally misunderstood. And, finally, Lex and Alice, Morgan's brother and sister-in-law - they're probably my favorites. Lex was changed after his attempt to jump over the edge, and now he broods and is anti-social and a little mean. Yet, he loves his little sister and his wife so much, he's willing to do whatever it takes to make them safe.

    Perfect Ruin is told from Morgan's POV. She really is the main focus of the story, so that makes sense. There is no cliffhanger, but the ending is left WIDE open for the story to continue in the next book. I absolutely cannot wait to see what happens. It's going to be really good.

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2013

    What a gorgeous book. I have been a fan of Lauren DeStefano sinc

    What a gorgeous book. I have been a fan of Lauren DeStefano since I first read Wither a few years back. Her writing is on another level. Every word, every sentence, seems flawlessly stitched together. Her characters practically soar off of the page. This story has a fabulous plot line. Super unique, just like the world of Internment, which floats in the clouds. It begins with Morgan, a girl who dreams of going to the edge: it is forbidden, yet it calls to her every day. Morgan just wants to be normal. She wants to do what she's told, and marry her betrothed in a few years' time, and most importantly, not end up like her brother, who tried to jump over the edge a few years back.
    Fast forward in the novel, to where a murder of an innocent girl takes place. The world of Internment is thrown off balance, and everyone is afraid. But for some reason, Morgan seems fascinated by that fear. It draws her even MORE towards the edge...and others along with her.This book is beautifully written. Perfect pacing, a haunting mystery...I couldn't put it down. It's very different from the Chemical Garden Trilogy, yet the same in the sense that it's so atmospheric and lovely. I received a review copy for free from the publisher, but loved it so much that I purchased the hardcover to keep on my shelf!




    Looking forward to the sequel. Will preorder it ASAP!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2013

    Beautiful and brilliant!

    I read Lauren Destefano's Chemical Garden serires and loved it, so when I saw she had come out with a new series,I could not wait to get my hands on it. And I was not dissapointed in the least!

    I love the way Lauren writes. Her wording is so beautiful, clever and innocent. She comes up with this incredible world that could easily be possible.

    I loved all of the chatacters and the story keeps you on your feet and is unpredictable. I cannot wait for the next book!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 27, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    ***Review posted on The Eater of Books! blog*** Perfect Ruin

    ***Review posted on The Eater of Books! blog***




    Perfect Ruin by Lauren Destefano
    Book One of the Internment Chronicles
    Publisher: Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers
    Publication Date: October 1, 2013
    Rating: 2 stars
    Source: ARC sent by the publisher




    Summary (from Goodreads):




    On Internment, the floating island in the clouds where 16-year-old Morgan Stockhour lives, getting too close to the edge can lead to madness. Even though Morgan's older brother, Lex, was a Jumper, Morgan vows never to end up like him. She tries her best not to mind that her life is orderly and boring, and if she ever wonders about the ground, and why it is forbidden, she takes solace in best friend Pen and her betrothed, Basil.




    Then a murder, the first in a generation, rocks the city. With whispers swirling and fear on the wind, Morgan can no longer stop herself from investigating, especially when she meets Judas. He is the boy being blamed for the murder — betrothed to the victim — but Morgan is convinced of his innocence. Secrets lay at the heart of Internment, but nothing can prepare Morgan for what she will find — or who she will lose.




    What I Liked:




    I don't think I have spoilers in this review. But it's possible.




    I'm not even going to bother summarizing this book. It was a really bad experience for me, you all. I had such high hopes for. It sounds so dreamy, right? Like there is so much potential in this book. The synopsis really sold me, and any doubts I had were banished by the lovely cover. 




    No, wait. I SHOULD summarize this book. Basically, Morgan lives in a city in the sky. She wonders what is on the ground. Things happen, the dominoes start to fall, and suddenly, everyone is ALL ABOUT getting off Internment, and finding out what is on the ground.




    The writing is what gets this book two stars, versus one star or zero stars (yes, I have thought to give a book zero stars, if possible. Unfortunately, Goodreads doesn't let me give books zero stars). The writing is gorgeous, lyrical, poetic. I love the flow of the writing. It's almost like reading an epic poem or something. Sometimes, I'd pick out bits of prose, and whisper the words out loud. If there is one thing that Destefano did REALLY well, it is crafting her writing style. It's wonderful.




    But that's just about the only "wonderful" thing about this book.




    What I Did Not Like:




    How do I begin. I have no idea how to start. And you know, usually when I give a book a low rating (two, one, or zero stars), I get all fired up, because there something (or things) about the book that makes me angry. I get all passionate and riled up, and it comes across that way in my review. Well, with this book? I feel more resigned than anything else. Apathetic, I suppose. I'm almost disgusted. It took me TWO DAYS to read this book, rather than the usual two hours.




    While I LOVE the writing style, the book itself is SO BORING. I think one of my Goodreads status updates said something like, this book isn't boring, just dense. Well, that was about 35% into the book. And that 35% was VERY boring. I didn't think it was that bad at the time, because I reasoned that I was still less than halfway into the book.




    Well, honestly, this book NEVER picked up the pace. Even when something specific happened to Morgan and her parents, I was like, *rolls eyes*, why couldn't that thing happened to Morgan as well? Like, honestly, the book is so boring. Most of it dealt with Morgan moaning and complaining to herself that she is different, that she is too curious, that she dreams too much. Her "musings" are so whiny and ridiculous, in my opinion. And that's like, THE WHOLE BOOK. Oh my gosh, I feel so unsafe, the city is unsafe, oh and I want to look down at the ground, because I'm different, and my family is different, and everyone is watching me, oh I'm so special, la dee dah!




    Barf. Grow up, little girl. Morgan acts like such a child, with a child-like mentality. She approaches everything with a stupidity that baffled me. Go after the murderer? Yeah, GREAT idea, that will DEFINITELY make you feel safer. Go after Pen because you want to say goodbye? SO SMART, because, you know, everyone in the city ISN'T after your empty head. Right. Genius, really. Instead of spending so much time with your head in the clouds (quite literally), try actually USING your brain, and think about your survival. Morgan might have seen that the specialist was especially creepy when it came to the tea or drink or whatever. Idiot.




    I didn't connect with any of the characters. Just saying. They all seemed one-dimensional and stuck-up, if you ask me. Very flat, with no personality. WAIT, except Morgan - she had a personality. But I HATED her personality. It is dull and dry and scared and whiny and stupid and weak. I hate weak people. I especially hate weak people who are weak in the beginning of a book, and are still weak at the end of the book. Zero character development whatsoever.




    Oh, and let me tell you all about this very predictable plot. Internment is like paradise. Well, the phrase "trouble in paradise" basically sums up this book. Out of nowhere, in Morgan's time, there is disruption of the peace. A rebellion of some sort is taking place. So, obviously, what do you think is going to happen? Because, you know, Morgan wasn't daydreaming about leaving Internment and seeing the ground for nothing. You KNOW it's coming. Everything is so predictable UGH! 




    The only that thing that I thought was coming that didn't (at least, not in this book) was a possible love triangle. Basil and Morgan are paired together, as all citizens of Internment are paired before birth. So, when a different male who does not have his partner appears in Morgan's life, I was like, here we go with the love triangle business. Well, it DIDN'T happen (yet?), thank goodness. Small mercies.




    Basically, I really hated how I wasted two days of my time reading a book that really just did NOT get to the point. I felt like each page I read was the same thing, over and over. Morgan wants to see the ground. Morgan wants to be safe. Morgan thinks things are suspicious, but does nothing to protect herself. Blah blah blah. Morgan is so stupid and very dense and not brave AT ALL. There was this one passage, in which one of the characters tells Morgan that she was very brave. BULL. Morgan was a wimp. Morgan is a wimp.




    And tell me why there is so much emphasis on what Internment looks like, the outside of the city, and yet, when it comes down to it, we never actually get a clear idea as to what it looks like from the outside. I was so FURIOUS about that. You can't do that!




    Also, there are quite a few plot holes, with the world-building of Internment. Like, where do they get new resources? How do they manufacture their goods? Where does the waste go? Do you know how deadly waste from electricity harvesting, and water coolant from refrigeration and whatnot can be? And with a small city like Internment, you can't just dump it in a field like a landfill. And since Internment is (apparently) like a floating chunk of earth, you can't just shove it deep into the soil, because then it will just fall through the island of dirt. Right? And water? Where does the water come from, and go? The recycling plants? The industries? The inconsistencies of this "perfect" place drove me nuts.




    And the ending! What BULL! Everything happens so quickly, and there are no explanations to anything. I didn't know what was happening with the bird. I didn't know if things were going up or down or sideways. I know the main thing that happened, but the HOW is the problem. Too much of the ending is spent on coddling Morgan. Are you alright, Morgan? Are you hurt? Are you okay? STOP. JUST STOP. TELL ME WHAT IS GOING ON OUTSIDE. THROW HER OUT AND MAKE HER DESCRIBE EVERYTHING TO ME. T

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 10, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Famous for her Chemical Garden trilogy, Lauren DeStefano is back

    Famous for her Chemical Garden trilogy, Lauren DeStefano is back again with another dystopian! First of all, let's all take a moment and admire the beauty of that cover. It's so gorgeous, and I love all the little details around the girl! I seriously think all of DeStefano's books have amazing covers! Now off to what's actually inside the book. The main protagonist, Morgan, is a 16 year old girl who is living a happy live on Internment. What is Internment you say? Internment is actually a floating island in the middle of the clouds. They say it's a peace of ground that has been removed and placed up in the skies. In Internment, every girl is betrothed to a boy. Morgan is betrothed to Basil, and her best friend Pen, is betrothed to Thomas. I like how the four of them were good friends, and it was interesting to see that the girls actually LIKED their betroths. Morgan lives with her parents, and her older brother, Lex, lives in the apartment above with his wife, Alice. Lex isn't your ordinary brother, he's a jumper, meaning that he tried to jump of the island. Jumpers are usually taboo, and Lex actually turned blind because of the incident. Lex is also a very different guy who didn't actually agree with all of what Interment has to say.If you've read a couple of dystopian books, you can see where this is headed. It's not that it's predictable, but this is how dystopian books follow the  plot. One day, when a murder happens in Internment, the people go crazy. It isn't likely for anything bad to happen there. Everyone knows everyone, and everyone is friendly and nice to each other. Weird thing is, it doesn't stop here. More things start happening, and Morgan is freaked out. The characters in this book were lovely. Morgan was a typical 16 year old who was curious, and wanted answers. I loved her relationship with Basil, and he was such a nice guy! I did hope for more interaction with her brother because I wanted to find out more about this mysterious guy. While reading the book, I think there was a few times where I did get bored, but then I'm glad the book was able to pick up the pace again.Overall, Perfect Ruin was a great dystopian book. You have your corrupted government, your curious character, and your amazing plot! I definitely want to see what happens next in The Internment Chronicles, so I will be looking forward to the second book. Anyone who is interested in dystopian books should really pick this one up asap!  

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2014

    Kirkus

    Amazing!

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  • Posted August 15, 2014

    Let me start this review off by saying that I haven't reach the

    Let me start this review off by saying that I haven't reach the Chemical Garden Series, so this was my first book of DeStefano's that I read. I absolutely adored this book, it really had me pulled in from the start and had me dying to know what was going to happen next. I got really lucky getting this book because S&S only had a few of the bound manuscripts at BEA, and I asked to see on a whim if they had one and I was able to snag one.

    I was so excited for this. I found the concept really amazing, the way that there was this chunk of the world that just hovered in the sky, and their seemed to have their own beliefs that explained why it was there. I'm excited to see if in future books we get to see if there is another explanation as to what really happened to the land to make it so that it exists above the sky.

    I really fell in love with the characters. The way that Basil really loved Morgan, and how Penn and Morgan were true friends to one another. The connections between the character were so great, that I swooned and felt things the way they did. I was constantly rooting for them to make things work and to all stay together.

    I also liked how there was this overarching bad government, but that it was slightly more subtle until things started going haywire. It made me wonder why these governments don't just exile the dissident. Its nice and all to have these scape goats, but as usual it seems to make more trouble then its worth.

    I felt that Morgan's reaction to finding out about the dead girl was a valid reaction.When someone young dies, even if they are only some one you sort of know, it affects you. It makes you wonder what experiences that you get to have they will miss. You see these thoughts going through Morgan's head as she wonders about her betrothed and her family.

    I'm not really sure how much more I can gush about this book other than to say that I absolutely cannot wait to get my hands on the finished copy and the next book in what is bound to be a stellar new series.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2014

    A Must Read Classic!!

    I would have never normally picked up a book like this. But I am forever grateful for doing so! Not only is this book hard to put down, but it is highly intelligent, thoughtful, poetic, romantic, suspenseful, quirky, jaw-dropping, unordinary and one of it's own kind. I higly reccomend this book to any reader, young or old, male or female. You will not be let down! It is truly a wonderful read that both challenges you and draws you in as each page is revealed.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2014

    The Start of the End

    At cim res one, two, seven. Or something like that. Sorry, the result are all mixed up. Vey few grammar/ spelling errors. This is a dystopian world, but no one really knows. Think Hunger Games, but not as obvious. An anonymous corporation organizes a "scavenger hunt" called METTLE, where teens are kidnapped, and even killed, but everyone else believes it's simply reality show with faked drama.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2014

    2 stories

    Hunted~ Veronica croc, better known as queen Croc, swears revenge on 42 16 year olds. Each teen has their number burned into their hands, or branded. In this prologue it explains why Veronica became so evil, why she did what she did. I only have the prologue bevause I never acually got motivated to wriye more, but that is your decision. Lemon res one.<p>Goldenheart's Grace~ This prologue introduces the life of a warriors cat called Goldenheart. It tells about her life before Emberclan. Located at Watermelon res one. Maybe...<p> I like fruit!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2014

    A few fanfics

    Pokemon fanfic at did reses one thru five so far <p> MLP fanfic at september reses <p> MLP fanfic at hanno reses <p> MLP fanfic at pok res one so far <p> Pokemon fanfic at eos reses. Theyre all pretty good. Only one in here is one that i wrote!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2014

    Hopeless

    A story of a teen girl who thinks she's just a hopeless nerd, and that no one likes her. One day that changes. Will she be able to make a choice? Or will she be lonely again? Find out at 'hopeless' results 1-3. (I didn't make a prologue)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2014

    To Teagan

    Can i post it here?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2014

    The Lash Of Wintre!

    A small pup. A vicious history. The ultimate destiny. Will you bathe in blood or come out pure? Read at 'mechele' reses! Note-Reses are messed up, but each chapter is titled, so g like this: Prolouge, Chapter one, and so on

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2014

    I'll give you a bunch~

    The 'Mane' Six-
    <br>
    Rainbow Dash, Twilight Sparkle, Fluttershy, Applejack, Pinkie Pie, and Rarity
    <p>
    Minor Characters-
    <br>
    Princess Celestia, Nightmare Moon, Princess Luna, Trixie, The Shadow Bolts, The Wonder Bolts, Big Mac, Scootaloo, Sweetie Bell, Apple Bloom, Braeburn, Zecora, Cheerilee
    <p>
    Background Characters-
    <br>
    Octavia, Bonbon, Derpy Hooves, Berry Punch, Vinyl Scratch, Lyra, Caramel, Dr. Whooves, Rose, Carrot Top, Sea Swirl, Screwball, Nurse Redheart, Pokey, Davenport, Colgate

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2014

    2 things to teagan

    Do you rp at 7b. Im sofia)) pinkypie,AppleJack,YwilightSparkle,RainbowDash,Rarity,and Fluttershy. Also spike

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2014

    0 stars!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    This book is so stupid it made me feel bad for the author. I wouldn't tell anyone to get this from the library its so bad. I don't know what it was that made me hate it with such a burning passion, maybe it was because there was to many people to remember, maybe because they were so underdeveloped, maybe because at the end they just hop in a machine and go to the ground, or maybe it was the bratty prince and princess, or it could have been all of the above. In the end I just skiped to the end because I could not take it anymore. Do not wast you time or money on this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2014

    Thistlepath

    I rp Silverbolt in Horseclan , Flowernose in Horseclan (shes a medicine cat) and Poppy in the Iceclaws (the rogue group)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2014

    Teagan

    Tell me where your stories are here!

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  • Posted January 31, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Perfect Ruin is the first in a new dystopian series, The Internm

    Perfect Ruin is the first in a new dystopian series, The Internment Chronicles.  And it is an amazing beginning!   Lauren DeStefano is fantastic at what she does, creating dystopian worlds with just enough of our own reality mixed in to make it entirely believable.  There is definitely a bit of the science fiction  feel to this book, but in a different way from her Chemical Garden trilogy.  In that series, the science fiction was literally about science, futuristic and extraordinary, but science.  In this book, it is a bit different, with the separation of the world itself.  There was a bit of a steampunk feel to this book, too, even though it is clearly not set in a distant past.

    It is interesting that there is another common element between the two series and that is the idea of arranged marriage.  In her other series, marriage was bought and paid for and was in the polygamous way with the intent to repopulate the dying human world.  In Perfect Ruin, it is about the creation of an almost utopian world, creating matches based not on love but on compatibility.  But as it happens in many utopian societies, not everything is as perfect as it may seem.

    The characters in this book are all very different.  One of my favorites was Amy, the younger sister of a murdered girl.  Although she was not a main character, I loved her strong, independent, somewhat rebellious personality.  The main character, Morgan, was a restless spirit and I could identify with her.  She tended  to question things that perhaps she shouldn't have in her world, preferring to think for herself.  But that got her into trouble, too.

    There is a lot of mystery and intrigue in this book, a lot of questions.  There are times when it had a bit of a &quot;conspiracy theory&quot; feeling to it, but not in a crazy, unbelievable way.  Instead, it added to the suspense and anticipation of it all.  There is definitely a cliffhanger at the end, but it wasn't the usual &quot;life or death&quot; kind, but the kind that leaves  you wondering what is going to happen next!

    Things to love about Perfect Ruin...

       --The mythology of the world.  It is a dystopian/utopian blend, with a fascinating premise.
       --The suspense and anticipation.  I  loved the twists and turns and the way things changed on the drop of a dime.

    My recommendation:  Fantastic start to a great new series.  Fans of The Chemical Gardens will love this book, too!

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