Perform, Repeat, Record: Live Art in History

Overview

Bringing together contributors from dance, theater, visual studies, and art history, Perform, Repeat, Record addresses the conundrum of how live art is positioned within history.  Set apart from other art forms in that it may never be performed in precisely the same way twice, ephemeral artwork exists both at the time of its staging and long after in the memories of its spectators and their testimonies, as well as in material objects, visual media, and text, all of which offer new critical possibilities. ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (9) from $64.95   
  • New (5) from $70.22   
  • Used (4) from $64.95   
Sending request ...

Overview

Bringing together contributors from dance, theater, visual studies, and art history, Perform, Repeat, Record addresses the conundrum of how live art is positioned within history.  Set apart from other art forms in that it may never be performed in precisely the same way twice, ephemeral artwork exists both at the time of its staging and long after in the memories of its spectators and their testimonies, as well as in material objects, visual media, and text, all of which offer new critical possibilities. Among the artists, theorists, and historians who contributed to this volume are Marina Abramovic, Guillermo Gómez-Peña, Rebecca Schneider, Boris Groys, Jane Blocker, Carolee Schneemann, Tehching Hsieh, Orlan, Tilda Swinton, and Jean-Luc Nancy.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Choice
The ephemeral nature of performance art has made its inclusion in the art historical record particularly difficult. Among the many challenges is the tendency to use a single photograph to stand in for a temporal event, which unintentionally corrupts memories of the live performance. This impressive volume edited by performance art experts Jones and Heathfield features essays that articulate key concepts and challenges. Recommended.
Choice

The ephemeral nature of performance art has made its inclusion in the art historical record particularly difficult. Among the many challenges is the tendency to use a single photograph to stand in for a temporal event, which unintentionally corrupts memories of the live performance. This impressive volume edited by performance art experts Jones and Heathfield features essays that articulate key concepts and challenges. Recommended.
Limina

“One of the first scholarly texts to attempt to address how live art, as an ephemeral, often subversive, embodied act, becomes incorporated into history. . . An important kicking off point in what is a burgeoning arena of discourse.”
Drama and Performance Studies

Perform, Repeat, Record offers valuable—and at times long overdue—critical perspectives on issues of historicization and documentation of performance art.”
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781841504896
  • Publisher: Intellect, Limited
  • Publication date: 3/15/2012
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 700
  • Sales rank: 1,468,809
  • Product dimensions: 6.70 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Amelia Jones is an art theorist, curator, and researcher. She is the author of several books, including Seeing Differently: A History and Theory of Identification and the Visual Arts. Adrian Heathfield is a writer, curator, and professor of performance and visual culture at the University of Roehampton, London. He is the author of  Live: Art and Performance and Out of Now, among others.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents


Introductions
The Now and the Has Been: Paradoxes of Live Art in History
      Amelia Jones
Then Again
      Adrian Heathfield

Theories and Histories
Introduction
      Amelia Jones
1. The Performativity of Performance Documentation
      Philip Auslander
2. Dead Mannequin Walking: Fluxus and the Politics of Reception
      Hannah B. Higgins
3. The Viral Ontology of Performance
      Christopher Bedford
4. Can Photographs Make It So? Repeated Outbreaks of VALIE EXPORT's Genital Panic Since 1969
      Mechtild Widrich
5. Macular Degeneration: Some Peculiar Aspects of Performance Art Documentation
      Mónica Mayer
6. History and Precariousness: In Search of a Performative Historiography
      Eleonora Fabião
7. Performance Remains
      Rebecca Schneider
8. Not as Before, but Simply: Again
      André Lepecki
9. The Prosthetic Present Tense: Documenting Chinese Time-based Art
      Meiling Cheng
10. Progressive Striptease
      Sven Lütticken
11. Repetition: A Skin which Unravels
      Jane Blocker
12. Art in the Age of Biopolitics: From Artwork to Art Documentation
      Boris Groys
13. The Interstices of History
      Angela Harutyunyan, et al
An Unofficial Timeline of Socialist and Post-Socialist Performance
      Angela Harutyunyan, et al

Documents
Introduction
      Adrian Heathfield
14. A Text on 20 years with 66 footnotes
      Tim Etchells
15. Faith Wilding, Waiting and Wait-With
16. Lynn Hershman and/as Roberta Breitmore
17. We Are Formatted Memories
      Orlan
18. Franko B and Kamal Ackarie, Don't Leave Me This Way
19. Make Me Stop Smoking
      Rabih Mroué
20. The Personal Evolution of the Performance Object (Or, What to Do with Leftovers)
      Nao Bustamante
21. Cai Yuan and J.J. Xi, Mad for Real
22. Hayley Newman, MiniFlux
23. Daniel Joseph Martinez, Call Me Ishmael or The Fully Enlightened Earth Radiates Disaster Triumphant
24. Multiple Journeys: A Performance Chronology
      Guillermo Gómez-Peña
25. Attending to Anthony McCall's Long Film for Ambient Light
      Lucas Ihlein
26. ReCut Project
      Ming-Yuen S. Ma
27. Assuming a Migrant Woman's Identity
      Tanja Ostojić
28. Barbara Smith, Intimations of Immortality
29. Santiago Sierra and the "Contexts" of History
30. Reconstruction2
      Janez Janša
31. Documents of Chinese Time-based Art: Three Impressions from Three Fragments
      Meiling Cheng
32. Both Sitting Duet and Cheap Lecture
      Jonathan Burrows and Matteo Fargion
33. Aftermath: The Performance / Installation Nexus
      Blair French
Timeline of Ideas: Live Art in (Art) History, A Primarily European-US-based Trajectory of Debates and Exhibitions Relating to Performance Documentation and Re-enactments
      Amelia Jones

Dialogues
Introduction
      Adrian Heathfield
34. Interior Squirrel and the Vicissitudes of History
      Carolee Schneemann and Amelia Jones
35. I Just Go in Life
      Tehching Hsieh and Adrian Heathfield
36. The Maybe: Modes of Performance and the "Live"
      Tilda Swinton and Joanna Scanlan
37. Photography as a Performative Act
      Shezad Dawood and Amelia Jones
38. Do it Again, Do it Again (Turn Around, Go Back)
      Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard, with Andrew Renton
39. Touching Remains
      Janine Antoni and Adrian Heathfield
40. Reverse Martyrologies
      Ron Athey and Dominic Johnson
41. The Live Artist as Archaeologist
      Marina Abramović and Amelia Jones
42. Every House Has a Door
      Lin Hixson and Mathew Goulish
43. Alliterations
      Mathilde Monnier and Jean-Luc Nancy
      Introduction and Translation: Noémie Solomon
44. Intangibles
      Hugo Glendinning, Adrian Heathfield, and Tim Etchells

Acknowledgements
Author Biographies
Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)